Providing a place for sport

Sport NZ keen to help to improve Gisborne facilities.

Sport NZ keen to help to improve Gisborne facilities.

Waka ama was one of the fastest-growing sports in New Zealand. File picture

Sport New Zealand was eager to work with Gisborne to provide the facilities needed, including areas where there was deprivation, chief executive Peter Miskimmin told Gisborne District Council.

He congratulated the council for developing a recreational plan and committing to it.

One of the things Sport NZ wanted to get right was green spaces and facilities, and he complimented the council on theirs. It was critical that Sport NZ, through its regional sports trusts, worked to ensure this did happen.

“We acknowledge your region, the remoteness, the lack of infrastructure and that you have a young community and some areas of deprivation.

“We aim to help through Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti to work with you and ensure that we can provide well-being for your ratepayers.

Sport was an important part of New Zealand communities and Sport NZ wanted to support communities that were missing out.

Deprivation affected Maori, Pasifika and some Asian communities.

Sport NZ were also aware that teenage women had less involvement in sport.

Shannon Dowsing said there was an irony in that sporting bodies received a lot of funding from groups like the NZ Community Trust.

How could sport affect that area of problem gambling?

Mr Miskimmin said they put about $45 million into community sport.
“We are a very, very small player in a $2 billion business.

“Our job is not to solve some of the problems you are talking about — ours is to ensure that we partner with the likes of the Eastland Community Trust and the gaming trusts to ensure that they invest that money into the community where it is making the greatest impact possible.

“We work with quite a number of those gaming societies, to align strategies and investment to ensure the maximum benefit.

They were working with the Ministry of Education to see how its property portfolio could be used to provide facilities for communities in places like the East Coast.

Meredith Akuhata Brown congratulated Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti on the work that had been done, particularly in Kaiti which was a significant area of deprivation.

Kaiti did not have key infrastructure, although it had put in a softball diamond.

Mr Miskimmin said the best people to decide what should happen in their communities were those who lived in them. Softball here was an example now being used nationally.

“We are using what you do here in other parts of the country, which is a compliment to this region.

Mayor Meng Foon said councils in New Zealand spent hundreds of millions on providing and maintaining sporting infrastructure.

Mr Miskimmin said Gisborne was a very special place. Waka ama was one of the fastest-growing sports in New Zealand.

Sport New Zealand was eager to work with Gisborne to provide the facilities needed, including areas where there was deprivation, chief executive Peter Miskimmin told Gisborne District Council.

He congratulated the council for developing a recreational plan and committing to it.

One of the things Sport NZ wanted to get right was green spaces and facilities, and he complimented the council on theirs. It was critical that Sport NZ, through its regional sports trusts, worked to ensure this did happen.

“We acknowledge your region, the remoteness, the lack of infrastructure and that you have a young community and some areas of deprivation.

“We aim to help through Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti to work with you and ensure that we can provide well-being for your ratepayers.

Sport was an important part of New Zealand communities and Sport NZ wanted to support communities that were missing out.

Deprivation affected Maori, Pasifika and some Asian communities.

Sport NZ were also aware that teenage women had less involvement in sport.

Shannon Dowsing said there was an irony in that sporting bodies received a lot of funding from groups like the NZ Community Trust.

How could sport affect that area of problem gambling?

Mr Miskimmin said they put about $45 million into community sport.
“We are a very, very small player in a $2 billion business.

“Our job is not to solve some of the problems you are talking about — ours is to ensure that we partner with the likes of the Eastland Community Trust and the gaming trusts to ensure that they invest that money into the community where it is making the greatest impact possible.

“We work with quite a number of those gaming societies, to align strategies and investment to ensure the maximum benefit.

They were working with the Ministry of Education to see how its property portfolio could be used to provide facilities for communities in places like the East Coast.

Meredith Akuhata Brown congratulated Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti on the work that had been done, particularly in Kaiti which was a significant area of deprivation.

Kaiti did not have key infrastructure, although it had put in a softball diamond.

Mr Miskimmin said the best people to decide what should happen in their communities were those who lived in them. Softball here was an example now being used nationally.

“We are using what you do here in other parts of the country, which is a compliment to this region.

Mayor Meng Foon said councils in New Zealand spent hundreds of millions on providing and maintaining sporting infrastructure.

Mr Miskimmin said Gisborne was a very special place. Waka ama was one of the fastest-growing sports in New Zealand.

Community facilities adviser sought

Gisborne’s new community facilities strategy is moving to the next stage, with Gisborne District Council advertising for a community facilities partnership adviser.
The council has made changes to how it provides and manages community spaces and places — like arts facilities, sports areas, pools, parks, street trees and gardens, cemeteries, public conveniences and art in public places.
The council website says in September 2017 the community had the opportunity to feed back on its general approach and draft summaries of its strategy with some options. From that feedback, the council prepared draft plans and a strategic framework — including guidance for investing in facilities.
“Having quality community places and spaces is important, and helps attract talent and visitors to live, work and play here. We want more from our facilities in the right places, at a price we can all afford,” the council website says.
The new community facilities partnership adviser position is funded by Eastland Community Trust, GDC and Sport Gisborne.
The new full-time role for the region has significant outreach and requires exceptional stakeholder engagement, as well as an ability to drive key projects and outcomes of the strategy.
“The vision of the community facilities strategy is that Tairawhiti-Gisborne is the lifestyle destination of choice. We have a range of affordable and accessible ways to relax, be active, connect with each other and share our culture. We have safe spaces to play, learn and thrive and we are healthy and well,” the job description says.
The role reports to the director of transformation and relationships. The council says it needs a talented individual to bring the strategy to life, by building strong and meaningful relationships and understanding the diverse needs of our communities in line with the vision for the region.

Core functions of the role will include supporting the region to deliver priority community facility projects in a way that is consistent with the strategy, creating energy and momentum across the district through building trusting partnerships, being a catalyst for change and growth, articulating the vision and direction of the strategy to key groups, networks and stakeholders, and project management and leadership, including supervision, analysis and reporting on progress of programmes of work.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the new identity and wellbeing focus of Trust Tairawhiti (formerly Eastland Community Trust)?