No need to worry about 1080 Alain

Alain Jorion, you are concerned about 1080 in our Gisborne water supply. You shouldn’t be.

First, as I understand it, GDC is not considering the use of aerial 1080 for the Waingake Waterworks Bush because of anti-1080 sentiment which unfortunately shows little understanding of the actual use of this pest control poison and its suitability for controlling possums, rats and stoats, while not leaving behind any harmful residues as well as not accumulating in the environment.

Second, 1080 is not a problem in water. Of over 3500 water samples tested since 1990 only six have been above the official limit of two parts per billion. None of these were in human or stock water supply and it’s possible that four of those were false positives. The Auckland Council aerial 1080 drops in the Hunua Ranges (60 percent of their city water supply) in 2015 and again this year have shown no problems but have killed almost 100 percent of the rats and possums over about 23,000 hectares — great news for indigenous plants and animals.

Third, the Waingake Bush is not Gisborne’s only water supply catchment. The three dams to the south of said bush are in the headwaters of the Mangapoike River which flows south west and then west into the Wairoa River. There is also the Waipaoa River water augmentation scheme.

Finally, have you read Dave Hansford’s book yet? “Protecting Paradise, 1080 and the fight to save NZ’s wildlife”. Or the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment report “Evaluating the use of 1080: Predators, poisons and silent forests”? There is a lot of detail there, more than I can write here and containing a lot of worthwhile research and reference notes.

Grant Vincent

Chair, Forest & Bird Gisborne branch

Alain Jorion, you are concerned about 1080 in our Gisborne water supply. You shouldn’t be.

First, as I understand it, GDC is not considering the use of aerial 1080 for the Waingake Waterworks Bush because of anti-1080 sentiment which unfortunately shows little understanding of the actual use of this pest control poison and its suitability for controlling possums, rats and stoats, while not leaving behind any harmful residues as well as not accumulating in the environment.

Second, 1080 is not a problem in water. Of over 3500 water samples tested since 1990 only six have been above the official limit of two parts per billion. None of these were in human or stock water supply and it’s possible that four of those were false positives. The Auckland Council aerial 1080 drops in the Hunua Ranges (60 percent of their city water supply) in 2015 and again this year have shown no problems but have killed almost 100 percent of the rats and possums over about 23,000 hectares — great news for indigenous plants and animals.

Third, the Waingake Bush is not Gisborne’s only water supply catchment. The three dams to the south of said bush are in the headwaters of the Mangapoike River which flows south west and then west into the Wairoa River. There is also the Waipaoa River water augmentation scheme.

Finally, have you read Dave Hansford’s book yet? “Protecting Paradise, 1080 and the fight to save NZ’s wildlife”. Or the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment report “Evaluating the use of 1080: Predators, poisons and silent forests”? There is a lot of detail there, more than I can write here and containing a lot of worthwhile research and reference notes.

Grant Vincent

Chair, Forest & Bird Gisborne branch

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