Remembering when the guns fell quiet

At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

Returned servicemen and the public turned out in force for the centennial Armistice Day service yesterday. White crosses on the bank of the Taruheru River paid tribute to the 18,000 New Zealanders who did not come home, while the men were honoured at the cenotaph. The service began with two minutes silence at 11am, commemorative wreaths were laid, the NZ flag was lowered and Tony Bartlett drove his 1916 Buick in the parade — the same vehicle that took part in Armistice Day celebrations in 1918. Pictures by Liam Clayton
PAYING TRIBUTE TO THE FALLEN: Squadron Leader Tom Walsh, RNZAF, reads the In Flanders Field poem at yesterday’s Armistice Day service.
Armistice Day parade.
France and Allied countries: Dr Leutenant Colonel Retired Francois Dervin.
SPECIAL MOMENT: Tony Bartlett drove his 1916 Buick in the parade. The same vehicle was in the local Armistice parade in 1918 when it was owned by Mr Bartlett's father's uncle. Mr Bartlett still has the flag and the bunting that was on the car back in 1918.
BUICK MAKES ARMISTICE PARADE - FOR THE SECOND TIME!: Tony Bartlett driving his 102-year old Buick in the parade - complete with the original bunting and flag. It is the second Armistice Day parade the car has been in.
David McEwen.
NZ Army Assn Mr Ian Hunter.
Royal NZ Airforce Assn Vice President Allan Priday.
The merchant navy: Aden Taylor, Tom Macintosh.
Remembering our fallen men.
A time to remember those who fought for our freedom.
Armistice Day commemorations here in Gisborne.
Armistice day -

No Diggers remain, but their exploits and those of fallen comrades were honoured at yesterday’s centennial commemoration of Armistice Day at the Cenotaph in Gisborne.

There were some echoes of the joyous celebration in Gisborne in 1918, including another sunny spring day.

Tony Bartlett drove his 1916 Buick DX-45 Tourer in the parade — the same vehicle participated in Gisborne’s Armistice Day celebrations 100 years earlier.

Nurses and Midwives of Tairawhiti (NAMOT) honoured their predecessors by wearing replica World War 1 nursing uniforms.

Gisborne RSA president Paul Bayly said he was pleased with the turnout of veterans, serving members and the public.

Gisborne Military Vehicles Club provided several vehicles and fired a trench mortar, while Eastland Helicopter Rescue Trust and Gisborne Aero Club provided a flyover.

Guest speaker Major Wiremu Tamati-Smith, commanding officer, East Coast Company, 5th/7th Battalion Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment, said words were inadequate to describe the ordeal of World War 1.

The “dreadful conflict” claimed the lives of 18 million people, including more than 18,000 New Zealanders.

The scale of those losses traumatised New Zealand, he said.

Kiwi soldiers felt a sense of relief when the Armistice was announced.

More New Zealanders were killed in 1918 than in any other year of the war.

Celebrations in New Zealand were tempered by the loss of life.

Hopes for peace were to be ‘‘brutally dashed” 20 years later.

New Zealanders should be grateful for “the peace of today”, he said.

No Diggers remain, but their exploits and those of fallen comrades were honoured at yesterday’s centennial commemoration of Armistice Day at the Cenotaph in Gisborne.

There were some echoes of the joyous celebration in Gisborne in 1918, including another sunny spring day.

Tony Bartlett drove his 1916 Buick DX-45 Tourer in the parade — the same vehicle participated in Gisborne’s Armistice Day celebrations 100 years earlier.

Nurses and Midwives of Tairawhiti (NAMOT) honoured their predecessors by wearing replica World War 1 nursing uniforms.

Gisborne RSA president Paul Bayly said he was pleased with the turnout of veterans, serving members and the public.

Gisborne Military Vehicles Club provided several vehicles and fired a trench mortar, while Eastland Helicopter Rescue Trust and Gisborne Aero Club provided a flyover.

Guest speaker Major Wiremu Tamati-Smith, commanding officer, East Coast Company, 5th/7th Battalion Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment, said words were inadequate to describe the ordeal of World War 1.

The “dreadful conflict” claimed the lives of 18 million people, including more than 18,000 New Zealanders.

The scale of those losses traumatised New Zealand, he said.

Kiwi soldiers felt a sense of relief when the Armistice was announced.

More New Zealanders were killed in 1918 than in any other year of the war.

Celebrations in New Zealand were tempered by the loss of life.

Hopes for peace were to be ‘‘brutally dashed” 20 years later.

New Zealanders should be grateful for “the peace of today”, he said.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with the Government’s new guideline for police, to not prosecute drug users when a therapeutic approach would be more beneficial or there is no public interest in prosecution?