When judges give you more than lemons

WASTE NOT, WANT NOT: Maia Ingoe took first place in the New Zealand 2018 Young Reporters for the Environment (YRE) National Competition with her article, When Life Gives You Lemons. The Year 12 Gisborne Girls’ High School student’s article discusses how the fruit that goes to waste in local pack houses could be used to help people in the community. Picture supplied

A Gisborne girl has discovered that when life gives you lemons, you make lemonade.

Maia Ingoe took first place in the New Zealand 2018 Young Reporters for the Environment (YRE) National Competition in the 15 to 18 years category.

Maia’s article, When Life Gives You Lemons, is about fruit that goes to waste in local packhouses, and how this could be rectified by helping others in the community.

The Year 12 Gisborne Girls’ High School student has qualified for the international competition and a place in the National YRE workshop that took place earlier this month.

Maia said the competition was a perfect fit for her passion for writing and the environment.

“I’ve always been very aware of the waste crisis — not just plastic waste, but clothing waste, industrial waste and of course food waste, which my article was based on.

“It always seemed so ridiculous to me.

“How can so much food be thrown out when there are people living in poverty and struggling to afford food each week?

“The idea of taking food that would otherwise be wasted and giving it to people who need it is not a new concept — I just adapted it to citrus waste from pack houses.

“So much fruit is being discarded at packhouses as it does not meet consumer standards because of cosmetic faults.

“It seemed to me to be a kill-two-birds-with-one-stone situation,” said Maia.

Students were encouraged to link their project or article to one of the 17 United Nations sustainable development goals, which were adopted by world leaders in 2015.

Maia’s article states how the first United Nations sustainable development goal is to end poverty in all its forms and to address waste issues, poverty must also be considered.

The writing competition partnered with Wrigley’s Litter Less programme aims to reduce litter and affect long-term behaviour among young people, by providing them with an opportunity to take a stand on environmental issues they feel strongly about and give them a platform to articulate their views.

Keep New Zealand Beautiful had speakers at the winners workshop, which included photography and broadcasting sessions at the University of Auckland.

“Being able to talk to the people at the workshop about their work and how they got there, gave me some really good ideas and aspirations for my own career,” said Maia.

“It was a really amazing opportunity and I was very lucky Eastland Port offered to sponsor me.

“I want my writing to get people thinking and talking about these issues and get changes happening.

“The environment is, in my opinion, the most valuable asset the world has.

“Profit is being put over the environment in today’s world.

“The way I see it, the environment is our future, not just the future for future generations, but my future and everyone else’s future.

“If we don’t look after it then there is no future.”

A Gisborne girl has discovered that when life gives you lemons, you make lemonade.

Maia Ingoe took first place in the New Zealand 2018 Young Reporters for the Environment (YRE) National Competition in the 15 to 18 years category.

Maia’s article, When Life Gives You Lemons, is about fruit that goes to waste in local packhouses, and how this could be rectified by helping others in the community.

The Year 12 Gisborne Girls’ High School student has qualified for the international competition and a place in the National YRE workshop that took place earlier this month.

Maia said the competition was a perfect fit for her passion for writing and the environment.

“I’ve always been very aware of the waste crisis — not just plastic waste, but clothing waste, industrial waste and of course food waste, which my article was based on.

“It always seemed so ridiculous to me.

“How can so much food be thrown out when there are people living in poverty and struggling to afford food each week?

“The idea of taking food that would otherwise be wasted and giving it to people who need it is not a new concept — I just adapted it to citrus waste from pack houses.

“So much fruit is being discarded at packhouses as it does not meet consumer standards because of cosmetic faults.

“It seemed to me to be a kill-two-birds-with-one-stone situation,” said Maia.

Students were encouraged to link their project or article to one of the 17 United Nations sustainable development goals, which were adopted by world leaders in 2015.

Maia’s article states how the first United Nations sustainable development goal is to end poverty in all its forms and to address waste issues, poverty must also be considered.

The writing competition partnered with Wrigley’s Litter Less programme aims to reduce litter and affect long-term behaviour among young people, by providing them with an opportunity to take a stand on environmental issues they feel strongly about and give them a platform to articulate their views.

Keep New Zealand Beautiful had speakers at the winners workshop, which included photography and broadcasting sessions at the University of Auckland.

“Being able to talk to the people at the workshop about their work and how they got there, gave me some really good ideas and aspirations for my own career,” said Maia.

“It was a really amazing opportunity and I was very lucky Eastland Port offered to sponsor me.

“I want my writing to get people thinking and talking about these issues and get changes happening.

“The environment is, in my opinion, the most valuable asset the world has.

“Profit is being put over the environment in today’s world.

“The way I see it, the environment is our future, not just the future for future generations, but my future and everyone else’s future.

“If we don’t look after it then there is no future.”

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