Fight for life to go ahead

All safety processes in place to keep boxers safe.

All safety processes in place to keep boxers safe.

Fight for Life Ed Gisborne organisers say they will go ahead with their charity boxing event on November 30.

Organisers say they have all proper processes in place to prevent tragedies such as the death of a boxer after a charity event in Christchurch last weekend, and an earlier death in Hamilton in 2016.

Kain Parsons, 37, died in Christchurch Hospital on Wednesday, four days after he was knocked out at a charity boxing event.

In 2016, amateur boxer Neville Knight, 49, collapsed and died in a corporate boxing bout at Te Rapa in 2016. He was not hit and his trainer was reported as describing it as “a freak medical event”.

The Gisborne event raises money for the Life Education Trust and chairwoman Pat Seymour says Boxing NZ is in communication with the Gisborne event organisers and others with regard to several upcoming events.

Gisborne Fight for Life head coach Kim-Maree Larby said yesterday the 2018 event will go ahead.

“The East Coast Boxing Association and I set a blanket rule three years ago that we would train and run all our corporate fight night competitors under the same technical and competition rules as an amateur-level boxing tournament,” she said.

“Our competitors are permitted to fight, provided the application is covered off in full, including full medical clearance from their own personal GPs and full blood work. We will also submit their experience levels, training regimes and match-ups,” she said.

Competitors have a strict training regime. Seven days of training are offered across one boxing gym and two fitness gyms. They must attend a minimum of four a week.

“Our competitors have trained alongside their opponents since the beginning of the campaign. Because of this, we are confident our competitors are evenly matched and safe to compete, as we have already seen them training and sparring in the ring together,” she said.

The competitors will have medicals done prior to taking the ring and the doctor will also be in attendance on the night.

Wearing headgear in boxing ring is optional

Kain Parsons, a former builder-turned-project manager for Versatile Garages, was knocked unconscious during a fight against former Canterbury and Tasman Makos half-back Steve Alfeld at Fight for Christchurch on Saturday.

Witnesses said he was stunned twice by punches, prompting the referee to give him two eight standing counts in the first round to check if he was OK to continue, before he was knocked out in the second round.

Parsons was not wearing headgear, which was optional. The policy is in line with New Zealand Professional Boxing Association (NZPBA).

A review into the fight is under way.

Inspector Darryl Sweeney said police were liaising with the event’s organisers and officials as they investigated what happened.

Event operator Callam Mitchell said on Sunday it was too early to say whether the event would be held again but changes would be made if it was. The changes would be based on the outcome of the review, and in discussion with the NZPBA.

New Zealand Professional Boxing Association president Pat Leonard said “everyone is in shock.”

“This is the first incident in our national association’s history where a fighter has suffered a critical injury in the ring.

He could find no fault with the processes that Fight for Christchurch follows.

Amateur boxer Neville Knight, 49, collapsed and died in a corporate boxing bout at Te Rapa in 2016.

He was not hit and his trainer was reported as describing it as “a freak medical event”.

Following the tragedy, amateur International Boxing Association supervisor Keith Walker said boxing was a physical sport and should not be used as a fundraising mechanism.

Amateur fighters, who must be aged under 40, had to register with Boxing New Zealand and pass a medical before fighting, he said.

Fighters for corporate fundraising events faced the same rules but there was no age limit and boxers could vary widely in age, weight and experience.

Fight for Life Ed Gisborne organisers say they will go ahead with their charity boxing event on November 30.

Organisers say they have all proper processes in place to prevent tragedies such as the death of a boxer after a charity event in Christchurch last weekend, and an earlier death in Hamilton in 2016.

Kain Parsons, 37, died in Christchurch Hospital on Wednesday, four days after he was knocked out at a charity boxing event.

In 2016, amateur boxer Neville Knight, 49, collapsed and died in a corporate boxing bout at Te Rapa in 2016. He was not hit and his trainer was reported as describing it as “a freak medical event”.

The Gisborne event raises money for the Life Education Trust and chairwoman Pat Seymour says Boxing NZ is in communication with the Gisborne event organisers and others with regard to several upcoming events.

Gisborne Fight for Life head coach Kim-Maree Larby said yesterday the 2018 event will go ahead.

“The East Coast Boxing Association and I set a blanket rule three years ago that we would train and run all our corporate fight night competitors under the same technical and competition rules as an amateur-level boxing tournament,” she said.

“Our competitors are permitted to fight, provided the application is covered off in full, including full medical clearance from their own personal GPs and full blood work. We will also submit their experience levels, training regimes and match-ups,” she said.

Competitors have a strict training regime. Seven days of training are offered across one boxing gym and two fitness gyms. They must attend a minimum of four a week.

“Our competitors have trained alongside their opponents since the beginning of the campaign. Because of this, we are confident our competitors are evenly matched and safe to compete, as we have already seen them training and sparring in the ring together,” she said.

The competitors will have medicals done prior to taking the ring and the doctor will also be in attendance on the night.

Wearing headgear in boxing ring is optional

Kain Parsons, a former builder-turned-project manager for Versatile Garages, was knocked unconscious during a fight against former Canterbury and Tasman Makos half-back Steve Alfeld at Fight for Christchurch on Saturday.

Witnesses said he was stunned twice by punches, prompting the referee to give him two eight standing counts in the first round to check if he was OK to continue, before he was knocked out in the second round.

Parsons was not wearing headgear, which was optional. The policy is in line with New Zealand Professional Boxing Association (NZPBA).

A review into the fight is under way.

Inspector Darryl Sweeney said police were liaising with the event’s organisers and officials as they investigated what happened.

Event operator Callam Mitchell said on Sunday it was too early to say whether the event would be held again but changes would be made if it was. The changes would be based on the outcome of the review, and in discussion with the NZPBA.

New Zealand Professional Boxing Association president Pat Leonard said “everyone is in shock.”

“This is the first incident in our national association’s history where a fighter has suffered a critical injury in the ring.

He could find no fault with the processes that Fight for Christchurch follows.

Amateur boxer Neville Knight, 49, collapsed and died in a corporate boxing bout at Te Rapa in 2016.

He was not hit and his trainer was reported as describing it as “a freak medical event”.

Following the tragedy, amateur International Boxing Association supervisor Keith Walker said boxing was a physical sport and should not be used as a fundraising mechanism.

Amateur fighters, who must be aged under 40, had to register with Boxing New Zealand and pass a medical before fighting, he said.

Fighters for corporate fundraising events faced the same rules but there was no age limit and boxers could vary widely in age, weight and experience.

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