Opportunity for more displays of public art

OFF THE WALL: Aerosol artist Cracked Ink’s Kahutia Street work was part of the Sea Walls Tairawhiti murals project — a concept that ties in with Gisborne District Council’s proposed Art in Public Places plan. It aims to guide the creation of art in public places in a timely, relevant and engaging way as the Sea Walls project achieved. Picture by Liam Clayton

Public consultation has resulted in a new policy being added to Gisborne District Council’s draft Art in Public Places plan.

The new policy clarifies that the council will consider making its public buildings available for the display and exhibition of artists’ work.

The community development committee will recommend the council adopts the draft Art in Public Places plan, with the new policy, at its next meeting on December 13.

Larry Foster said he supported the concept of art in public places. The Sea Walls murals added vibrancy to the town. Art in public places should be encouraged.

Cultural activities manager Pene Walsh reminded the committee that the Art in Public Places Trust was independent and the council was a beneficiary of whatever it decided to fund.

One example was the perspex sculpture in Gladstone Road while another was the surf eras-themed steel sculpture being worked on for Roberts Road.

The trust decided on the artwork and sourced the required funding, with the council taking responsibility for installation and maintenance.

Shannon Dowsing said he had made the original presentation to the council for the PangeaSeed Foundation’s Sea Walls public art programme. The council made its decision to support the programme on the same day.

Mr Dowsing said he wanted it to be as simple as possible for artists to be involved in art in public places.

The draft plan provides strategic direction for public art in Tairawhiti over the next 20 years, reflecting the people and environment, as well as celebrating the region’s history.

It aims to guide the creation of art in public places in a timely, relevant and engaging way.

During public consultation from September 13 to October 5, the council received 19 submissions and 39 posts on Facebook.

Across written and online submissions, there was a general desire for more community involvement in decision-making and a reduced role for the council as a facilitator or enabler.

This feedback was consistent with the direction of the plan, said a spokewoman.

The plan proposes to diversify public art and improve decision-making processes to become more transparent and fair.

It sets responsibilities for developing, deciding on and looking after public art, and proposes the employment of a part-time coordinator to progress the Art in Public Places programme.

The plan includes key issues affecting the art sector summarised under three themes — working together, decision-making and advocacy, and place-making.

It provides an objective for each of the key issues, along with policies to achieve these.

Funding provided in the current long-term plan will not cover the implementation of proposed actions within the plan so the council will consider funding for implementation in its next long-term plan due to start in 2021.

External funding may also be sought.

Public consultation has resulted in a new policy being added to Gisborne District Council’s draft Art in Public Places plan.

The new policy clarifies that the council will consider making its public buildings available for the display and exhibition of artists’ work.

The community development committee will recommend the council adopts the draft Art in Public Places plan, with the new policy, at its next meeting on December 13.

Larry Foster said he supported the concept of art in public places. The Sea Walls murals added vibrancy to the town. Art in public places should be encouraged.

Cultural activities manager Pene Walsh reminded the committee that the Art in Public Places Trust was independent and the council was a beneficiary of whatever it decided to fund.

One example was the perspex sculpture in Gladstone Road while another was the surf eras-themed steel sculpture being worked on for Roberts Road.

The trust decided on the artwork and sourced the required funding, with the council taking responsibility for installation and maintenance.

Shannon Dowsing said he had made the original presentation to the council for the PangeaSeed Foundation’s Sea Walls public art programme. The council made its decision to support the programme on the same day.

Mr Dowsing said he wanted it to be as simple as possible for artists to be involved in art in public places.

The draft plan provides strategic direction for public art in Tairawhiti over the next 20 years, reflecting the people and environment, as well as celebrating the region’s history.

It aims to guide the creation of art in public places in a timely, relevant and engaging way.

During public consultation from September 13 to October 5, the council received 19 submissions and 39 posts on Facebook.

Across written and online submissions, there was a general desire for more community involvement in decision-making and a reduced role for the council as a facilitator or enabler.

This feedback was consistent with the direction of the plan, said a spokewoman.

The plan proposes to diversify public art and improve decision-making processes to become more transparent and fair.

It sets responsibilities for developing, deciding on and looking after public art, and proposes the employment of a part-time coordinator to progress the Art in Public Places programme.

The plan includes key issues affecting the art sector summarised under three themes — working together, decision-making and advocacy, and place-making.

It provides an objective for each of the key issues, along with policies to achieve these.

Funding provided in the current long-term plan will not cover the implementation of proposed actions within the plan so the council will consider funding for implementation in its next long-term plan due to start in 2021.

External funding may also be sought.

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