Our loss, capital’s gain

‘If I can make it, so can children in Tairawhiti’

‘If I can make it, so can children in Tairawhiti’

‘I’ll be back’: Arish Naresh (inset) is heading to a new role at Capital and Coast Health Board but vows to return to a place he calls “paradise”. He will be missed for his many activities in the Tairawhiti health and social sector. His numerous roles include Justice of the Peace, New Zealand Dental and Oral Health Therapists Association chairman, UNICEF New Zealand board trustee, Naresh Professional Services director, Tairawhiti Multicultural Council president, team leader for the school dental service and director of Allied Health and Technical at Hauora Tairawhiti. File picture
Tairawhiti Multicultural Council's annual Colour Run ahas been a huge community success. File picture

PRIVILEGED people have a moral and ethical responsibility to help disadvantaged children in Tairawhiti.

That is the adamantly expressed opinion of White Ribbon ambassador, dental therapist, Tairawhiti Multicultural Council founder and health board manager Arish Naresh, who is taking up a career opportunity in Wellington in February.

Mr Naresh will be missed in the Tairawhiti health and social sector, particularly by White Ribbon for which he was only recently appointed an ambassador.

He told The Gisborne Herald he had been thinking about his options for several weeks before accepting an interview and consequently getting the job as executive director, allied scientific and technical at Capital and Coast District Health Board.

He will be responsible for a unit of 800 staff compared to 178 at Hauora Tairawhiti.

Mr Naresh said he would remain active with his other activities “because that is who I am”.

He came from a background of drugs, alcohol and family violence

He came from a background of drugs, alcohol and family violence.

“If I can make it so can children in Tairawhiti.”

Medical staff and other professionals had a societal responsibility to help those less fortunate than themselves. There was no excuse for family violence and the high murder rate of women, he said.

Mr Naresh had no plans to leave Gisborne until recently.

“My only plans were to have a house-warming.’’

He was “really passionate” about White Ribbon and was also concerned about dowry-related violence in Indian society.

He would remain involved in multi-cultural activities, he said.

Mr Naresh said he had spent “a brilliant’’ six years in Tairawhiti.

“I just want to thank so many people who have been a significant part of my life and helped me in my development. This region has given me so much.”

“Forever grateful for the aroha (love) I have received here”

He had no direct relatives in Tairawhiti and would “be forever grateful for the aroha (love) I have received here”.

Hauora Tairawhiti chief executive Jim Green Tairawhiti said Mr Naresh has made contributions to the health of Tairawhiti people in many ways through his role as team leader for the school dental service and as director of Allied Health and Technical at the health board.

“Arish has had a hand in lifting our oral health services so that rates of dental disease for children are reducing in Tairawhiti.

“He has brought the roles of our allied health and technical staff to the forefront in decision-making and care provided.

“He is leaving an enduring legacy in improvement in care and outcomes for people”.

Tauawhi Men’s Centre co-ordinator Tim Marshall said Mr Naresh had done much to raise awareness about diversity in cultural and other areas.

“His work with driving the development of Tairawhiti Multicultural Council, locally and nationally, is just one example.

‘‘Another was embracing the White Ribbon anti-violence kaupapa.

“Other areas included OWD — a novel approach to engage people in activity and conversation about respecting difference — and the partnership with the Gisborne Harrier Club on the Colour Run, which created a family-friendly fun event to promote the kaupapa.

“He combines all this with his efforts in his work role to increase accessibility to those most in need on our community.

“We had hoped to build our local White Ribbon pool. He will be a loss to our community but an asset to the next one he goes to.”

Mr Naresh said his last day in Gisborne would be February 22.

“I will definitely come back some day to live in paradise again.”

PRIVILEGED people have a moral and ethical responsibility to help disadvantaged children in Tairawhiti.

That is the adamantly expressed opinion of White Ribbon ambassador, dental therapist, Tairawhiti Multicultural Council founder and health board manager Arish Naresh, who is taking up a career opportunity in Wellington in February.

Mr Naresh will be missed in the Tairawhiti health and social sector, particularly by White Ribbon for which he was only recently appointed an ambassador.

He told The Gisborne Herald he had been thinking about his options for several weeks before accepting an interview and consequently getting the job as executive director, allied scientific and technical at Capital and Coast District Health Board.

He will be responsible for a unit of 800 staff compared to 178 at Hauora Tairawhiti.

Mr Naresh said he would remain active with his other activities “because that is who I am”.

He came from a background of drugs, alcohol and family violence

He came from a background of drugs, alcohol and family violence.

“If I can make it so can children in Tairawhiti.”

Medical staff and other professionals had a societal responsibility to help those less fortunate than themselves. There was no excuse for family violence and the high murder rate of women, he said.

Mr Naresh had no plans to leave Gisborne until recently.

“My only plans were to have a house-warming.’’

He was “really passionate” about White Ribbon and was also concerned about dowry-related violence in Indian society.

He would remain involved in multi-cultural activities, he said.

Mr Naresh said he had spent “a brilliant’’ six years in Tairawhiti.

“I just want to thank so many people who have been a significant part of my life and helped me in my development. This region has given me so much.”

“Forever grateful for the aroha (love) I have received here”

He had no direct relatives in Tairawhiti and would “be forever grateful for the aroha (love) I have received here”.

Hauora Tairawhiti chief executive Jim Green Tairawhiti said Mr Naresh has made contributions to the health of Tairawhiti people in many ways through his role as team leader for the school dental service and as director of Allied Health and Technical at the health board.

“Arish has had a hand in lifting our oral health services so that rates of dental disease for children are reducing in Tairawhiti.

“He has brought the roles of our allied health and technical staff to the forefront in decision-making and care provided.

“He is leaving an enduring legacy in improvement in care and outcomes for people”.

Tauawhi Men’s Centre co-ordinator Tim Marshall said Mr Naresh had done much to raise awareness about diversity in cultural and other areas.

“His work with driving the development of Tairawhiti Multicultural Council, locally and nationally, is just one example.

‘‘Another was embracing the White Ribbon anti-violence kaupapa.

“Other areas included OWD — a novel approach to engage people in activity and conversation about respecting difference — and the partnership with the Gisborne Harrier Club on the Colour Run, which created a family-friendly fun event to promote the kaupapa.

“He combines all this with his efforts in his work role to increase accessibility to those most in need on our community.

“We had hoped to build our local White Ribbon pool. He will be a loss to our community but an asset to the next one he goes to.”

Mr Naresh said his last day in Gisborne would be February 22.

“I will definitely come back some day to live in paradise again.”

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