Feeling the East Coast Vibes

'We just had a groove with Gisborne': Annie Crummer.

'We just had a groove with Gisborne': Annie Crummer.

MAKE SOME NOISE: A happy crowd dances to Annie Crummer’s high energy, eclectic sound on the second day of the East Coast Vibes festival. Pictures by Rebecca Grunwell
Annie Crummer (pictured) has worked with New Zealand bands Netherworld Dancing Toys, When The Cat’s Away and Herbs, but it was her father, Will Crummer, a Cook Islander, who was one of her strongest musical influences. "My mother is from Tahiti, my father is from Rarotonga, but I was brought up in West Auckland, yee-aah!” she told the crowd. "I’ve been so looking forward to coming over. Thank you guys. We just had a groove with Gisborne." The pull of East Coast Vibes was too strong to resist for Tai Tangaroa Kauraka who was among several Pacific Islanders who flew from Rarotonga for the festival.“We heard a lot about it,” he said. "There are a few Cook Islanders in the line-up — Annie Crummer, Lomez Brown and others. I like to get out there and support our own. I’ll definitely be back next year."
East Coast Vibes
East Coast Vibes.
GOT THE T-SHIRT: ‘It’s my first time here and it won’t be my last,’ said festival-goer BJ Nathan (second left) who is joined by Johnelle Nathan (left), Josh Murray and Shaun Mason. ‘It’s the whole vibe, just people in general, the weather and so much more.’
Californian R&B/soul musician Kennyon Brown ends his set with a song dedicated to ‘all my homies who want to chill’.


ONE LOVE: Flying the red, yellow and green Rastafarian colours, Colleen Cotter, Dione Neri and Andy Raroa brought the “one love” message to the festival.
A festival-goer grooves up close to the music in the mosh pit.
Annie Crummer.
Lavina Williams of three-piece New Zealand girl group Ma-V-Elle heats up the Outdoor Theatre stage on day two of the East Coast Vibes festival.
East Coast Vibes. Jaimee Tasker
East Coast Vibes. Patsy Roberts and Des Te Awa
Tiara Weir (left), Monica Taiatini, Chance Hale, May Tai and Stormy Merritt are happy to be hanging out together at the two-day East Coast Vibes festival.

Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun, composer Noel Coward wrote last century but he was proved wrong when hundreds of people danced under the East Coast sun at the East Coast Vibes festival on Saturday.

The mostly reggae-driven beats were so fat they were physical as people danced in the Outdoor Theatre’s mosh pit and on the sun-bleached slopes.

MCs Biondi and comedian Te Hamua Nikora kept the crowd smiling as they improvised between acts but added a safe sex reminder to their banter.

“Put your gumboot on before you take out your Harley,” said Mr Nikora.

“I just come up with these logos and slogans.”

A group from Frasertown carrying a flag with Rastafarian colours of red, yellow and green and adorned with the words “one love” arrived for the second day of the two-day festival.

“It’s about the vibe,” said Andy Roroa.

“I’m looking forward to everything.”

Julian Marley, son of Bob Marley, was the much-anticipated headline act for the second day of the two-day festival but Annie Crummer and her band were a sure highlight in the afternoon. The charismatic singer brought a dramatic flourish to the stage with her sound that mixed in jazz notes, sometimes near operatic drama and not a little sass.

“Don’t be so white, man,” she said in an aside after the first line to a rendition of Blue Mink’s 1969 hit Melting Pot that opens with “Take a pinch of white man/wrap him up in black skin/add a touch of blue blood/ And a little bitty bit of red Indian boy”.

Towards the end of the song the band switched to a reggae beat and took Melting Pot to a coffee-coloured level.

Only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun, composer Noel Coward wrote last century but he was proved wrong when hundreds of people danced under the East Coast sun at the East Coast Vibes festival on Saturday.

The mostly reggae-driven beats were so fat they were physical as people danced in the Outdoor Theatre’s mosh pit and on the sun-bleached slopes.

MCs Biondi and comedian Te Hamua Nikora kept the crowd smiling as they improvised between acts but added a safe sex reminder to their banter.

“Put your gumboot on before you take out your Harley,” said Mr Nikora.

“I just come up with these logos and slogans.”

A group from Frasertown carrying a flag with Rastafarian colours of red, yellow and green and adorned with the words “one love” arrived for the second day of the two-day festival.

“It’s about the vibe,” said Andy Roroa.

“I’m looking forward to everything.”

Julian Marley, son of Bob Marley, was the much-anticipated headline act for the second day of the two-day festival but Annie Crummer and her band were a sure highlight in the afternoon. The charismatic singer brought a dramatic flourish to the stage with her sound that mixed in jazz notes, sometimes near operatic drama and not a little sass.

“Don’t be so white, man,” she said in an aside after the first line to a rendition of Blue Mink’s 1969 hit Melting Pot that opens with “Take a pinch of white man/wrap him up in black skin/add a touch of blue blood/ And a little bitty bit of red Indian boy”.

Towards the end of the song the band switched to a reggae beat and took Melting Pot to a coffee-coloured level.

All photographs taken by Gisborne Herald photographers are available for sale here.

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Wilz Babbington - 7 months ago
There were so many unanswered questions on East Coast Vibes 2019 Facebook page just like this one "Is there a set timetable for Friday and Saturday's concert?" Finally Friday afternoon a timetable had been released and it was then all over Facebook, that's when myself and friends started planning our days out. The timetable was actually right but for some reason it was changed at the last minute on Saturday, hence we missed the act we bought our tickets for!!!

Absolutely disappointed that this happened and with no explanation why. Having Annie Crummer being read my message of amazement by broadcaster Matai Rangi Smith live on Thursday morning on Turanga FM - it was mine and a few friends' absolute pleasure to be able to buy a VIP ticket just to watch her on Saturday afternoon, but we only got to hear one song as we arrived in the gate at 4.50pm and she was meant to start at 4.40pm. But what do we, "FINISHED".

I've been to East Coast Vibes every year since it started and you've had a timetable every other year - and always stuck to it. Not this year. I don't know what it was, maybe DJs didn't turn up but that still shouldn't give the organisers the right to change times around to suit them. We've paid good money for our favourite act, to be slapped with her last song as we are walking through the gate at the time she was expected to start!

Totally disappointed. The passes we had purchased gave us the chance to mingle with the artists, but that wasn't possible. For myself the only good thing about being VIP was being close to the stage and a free T shirt.

Staff and artists look forward to being there and having photos with people. Instead it wasn't like that - they looked at some like we were 3rd class prisoners, no mingling whatsoever. Artists were in their own area - VIP should be class, not ass.

The moral of this is we missed our idol, our main act, because why? No DJ or a head act pulled out!

Here's a very good tip: Stick to what has been printed!!!!!! This needs to be addressed so festival-goers know you can have your say and you can make sure this doesn't happen again.

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