A cracker show for Wairoa

New attractions include bottle rocket demo, climbing wall.

New attractions include bottle rocket demo, climbing wall.

THERE’S A HOLE IN MY BUCKET: Holey plastic pails were just one of the challenges competitors in the rural ironman challenge had to contend with at last year’s Wairoa A&P Show. The challenge is back this year, along with many other crowd-pleasers. File picture

A nine-metre climbing wall and Rocket Lab bottle rocket demonstrations will feature at this year’s 118th Wairoa A&P Show.

The new activities will join the annual favourites, including equestrian events, shearing, home industries, speed shearing, rodeo, an animal zoo, rural ironman, junior stock judging, sheep and wool judging, dog trials and children’s entertainment.

Event manager Laura Hooper said there would be a good crowd of trade tents at this year’s event, and there would also be an influx of local food providers.

“It’s neat to have that community theme,” Mrs Hooper said.

“Friday will be the family day and everyone is welcome.”

Gates open at noon and entry is $5 for adults. Entry is free for children under five.

“We wanted to make it affordable and open to everyone,” said Mrs Hooper.

“ There will be the traditional locals’ rodeo night followed by the speed shear. There will also be food, rides and music to enjoy.”

Equestrian events get under way from tomorrow, with the family day on Friday and the main show day on Saturday.

Mrs Hooper said there would be a new water ride this year and a competition to see how long people can ride a mechanical bull.

“There are a lot of cash prizes this year so it is worthwhile getting involved.”

Entries across all categories had been pleasing, with the dog trials welcoming big competitor numbers this year, she said.

The rodeo event was always a drawcard, attracting crowds of people, complete with their picnic blankets, ready for a day of entertainment.

Rodeo numbers are up from last year with competitors from throughout New Zealand, including New Zealand women’s champion Rhondine Long from Oamaru, rope and tie competitor Anthony Perkins from Gore, barrel racing competitor Jenny Aitkinson from Middlemarch, and the Church family, Aaron senior and Aaron junior.

Wairoa Rodeo Club president Ash O’Connor said contract stock would be used for all events on Saturday.

These would be the only cattle stock on the grounds, Mr O’Connor said.

All are from areas unaffected by Mycoplasma bovis. He said local stock would be sourced for Friday night.”

The shearing competitions are another annual favourite at the Wairoa show.

This year Wairoa has been included in the Welsh Provincial Challenge series where the top two East Coast shearers from the open heats will compete in a team event against the Welsh shearing team, taking place just before the open final.

Three locals will also be awarded their New Zealand Shearing Sports judges badges.

They are Graeme Roadley, Tristan Mackay and Jackie Paku.

They will join the ranks of fellow qualified judges Margie Baynes and Bart Hadfield.

Mrs Hooper said entries for the equestrian section were steady for this year’s show, with a mix of new and repeat competitors.

“We once again are fortunate to have renowned course builder John Vallance joining the event from Australia.

“Also the long-standing Devery Cup, which has been around since the show first began, is in prime position in ring one.”

The “biggest Scotch thistle” competition will be returning once again after a successful three years at the show.

All entries should be delivered to the sheep pens on Friday morning.

Entry is free, with prize money for first, second and third placegetters.

Don’t forget the scarecrow competition, which was another favourite for local youngsters at last year’s show.

There will be two age categories for the scarecrow competition: one for those aged 12 and under, and the other for ages 13 to 18.

Cash prizes and ribbons will be presented to the winning scarecrow.

Entries for the competition need to be handed in to the Wairoa A&P Show office tomorrow morning before 10am.

The home industries section is always popular, with an abundance of categories, from baking and preserves to photography, handcrafts and garden produce.

Today is the last day for entries to be delivered, to the home industry room, between noon and 3pm.

Children and adults are encouraged to try their hand at the ever-popular Rural Ironman Challenge.

The event will test locals and visitors with an obstacle course complete with hay bales and the added challenge of carrying a boar or deer on their backs.

Teams of three will race against the clock, and ultimately each other, to win cash prizes for first, second and third places.

A nine-metre climbing wall and Rocket Lab bottle rocket demonstrations will feature at this year’s 118th Wairoa A&P Show.

The new activities will join the annual favourites, including equestrian events, shearing, home industries, speed shearing, rodeo, an animal zoo, rural ironman, junior stock judging, sheep and wool judging, dog trials and children’s entertainment.

Event manager Laura Hooper said there would be a good crowd of trade tents at this year’s event, and there would also be an influx of local food providers.

“It’s neat to have that community theme,” Mrs Hooper said.

“Friday will be the family day and everyone is welcome.”

Gates open at noon and entry is $5 for adults. Entry is free for children under five.

“We wanted to make it affordable and open to everyone,” said Mrs Hooper.

“ There will be the traditional locals’ rodeo night followed by the speed shear. There will also be food, rides and music to enjoy.”

Equestrian events get under way from tomorrow, with the family day on Friday and the main show day on Saturday.

Mrs Hooper said there would be a new water ride this year and a competition to see how long people can ride a mechanical bull.

“There are a lot of cash prizes this year so it is worthwhile getting involved.”

Entries across all categories had been pleasing, with the dog trials welcoming big competitor numbers this year, she said.

The rodeo event was always a drawcard, attracting crowds of people, complete with their picnic blankets, ready for a day of entertainment.

Rodeo numbers are up from last year with competitors from throughout New Zealand, including New Zealand women’s champion Rhondine Long from Oamaru, rope and tie competitor Anthony Perkins from Gore, barrel racing competitor Jenny Aitkinson from Middlemarch, and the Church family, Aaron senior and Aaron junior.

Wairoa Rodeo Club president Ash O’Connor said contract stock would be used for all events on Saturday.

These would be the only cattle stock on the grounds, Mr O’Connor said.

All are from areas unaffected by Mycoplasma bovis. He said local stock would be sourced for Friday night.”

The shearing competitions are another annual favourite at the Wairoa show.

This year Wairoa has been included in the Welsh Provincial Challenge series where the top two East Coast shearers from the open heats will compete in a team event against the Welsh shearing team, taking place just before the open final.

Three locals will also be awarded their New Zealand Shearing Sports judges badges.

They are Graeme Roadley, Tristan Mackay and Jackie Paku.

They will join the ranks of fellow qualified judges Margie Baynes and Bart Hadfield.

Mrs Hooper said entries for the equestrian section were steady for this year’s show, with a mix of new and repeat competitors.

“We once again are fortunate to have renowned course builder John Vallance joining the event from Australia.

“Also the long-standing Devery Cup, which has been around since the show first began, is in prime position in ring one.”

The “biggest Scotch thistle” competition will be returning once again after a successful three years at the show.

All entries should be delivered to the sheep pens on Friday morning.

Entry is free, with prize money for first, second and third placegetters.

Don’t forget the scarecrow competition, which was another favourite for local youngsters at last year’s show.

There will be two age categories for the scarecrow competition: one for those aged 12 and under, and the other for ages 13 to 18.

Cash prizes and ribbons will be presented to the winning scarecrow.

Entries for the competition need to be handed in to the Wairoa A&P Show office tomorrow morning before 10am.

The home industries section is always popular, with an abundance of categories, from baking and preserves to photography, handcrafts and garden produce.

Today is the last day for entries to be delivered, to the home industry room, between noon and 3pm.

Children and adults are encouraged to try their hand at the ever-popular Rural Ironman Challenge.

The event will test locals and visitors with an obstacle course complete with hay bales and the added challenge of carrying a boar or deer on their backs.

Teams of three will race against the clock, and ultimately each other, to win cash prizes for first, second and third places.

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