Gisborne District Court news

For his part in the theft of a jet ski and other offences, Andre Steve Hedge, 49, was jailed for seven months.

Hedge pleaded guilty to the theft, two charges of possessing drug utensils, for methamphetamine and cannabis, and two breaches of bail.

Judge Haamiora Raumati sentenced Hedge, who appeared via audiovisual-link from a prison remand unit where he has been since October last year after twice missing his scheduled sentencing, which resulted in the breach of bail charges.

Hedge and co-offenders took the jet ski from Gisborne aerodrome and delivered it to a prearranged buyer in Auckland.

Lawyer Leighvi Maynard said Hedge had no means of paying his $7500 share of the reparation sought for the unrecovered jet ski.

While Hedge had a criminal history, none of his previous offences was directly relevant to this sentencing, Judge Raumati said.

Mr Maynard said Hedge accepted a prison term was the appropriate outcome –– home detention was not an option. While on remand in custody, Hedge had been taking steps to address his drug addiction.

Taking account of the sentence imposed on one of Hedge’s co-offenders –– Cameron Roland Turnbull, 36 –– the judge set a starting point of 10 months imprisonment, reducing it by three months for Hedge’s guilty pleas.

Hedge will also be subject to release conditions for six months.

Patrick Arahanga, 34, was to spend no more time in jail having already served the equivalent of a nine-month prison term now imposed on him, the judge said.

The sentence was to cover two assaults on women, a charge of threatening behaviour and a breach of bail. Arahanga will be subject to release conditions for six months.

He was released from custody on bail last year when industrial action prevented his scheduled sentencings from going ahead and a risk arose of him ultimately serving too much time.

He had by then been imprisoned for as long as his anticipated sentence.

One of the assault charges and the charge of threatening behaviour arose out of an incident in April last year when Arahanga had a dispute with a friend over his use of her phone. He punched her in the mouth and when she walked away, he pursued her with a pole.

One of the woman’s neighbours intervened.

The other assault charge arose in July last year when he argued with a woman with whom he was at that time in a relationship.

The woman went to leave the room but Arahanga punched her on the wrist then stood over her yelling. He also threw a shoe at her, which struck her in the forearm.

The pair continued to argue as they left a property together. Arahanga slapped the woman over the head from behind. A bystander was concerned enough to approach and ask the woman if she needed help.

Arahanga grabbed his partner by the throat and told her to keep walking. Further down the street, the witness again stopped to see if the woman needed help. She got in that person’s car but only after Arahanga tried to stop her by putting her in a bear hug.

Judge Raumati noted Arahanga had prior convictions for similar offending but took account of his guilty pleas and the remorse he had since expressed.

He had been assessed as having good prospects of rehabilitation given certain commitments he had now made.

The judge set a sentence starting point of 10 months imprisonment, which he increased by two months for Arahanga’s history but reduced by three months for his guilty pleas and remorse.

An existing sentence of community work was cancelled.

A teenage offender has good prospects of rehabilitation now she has moved to Ruatoria, where she has prosocial family support, lawyer Michael Lynch says.

Messiah Mihi Lilian Haenga, 17, pleaded guilty to burglary, fighting in public, two assaults on police, and resisting police.

She received six months supervision, 100 hours community work and was ordered to make an emotional harm payment of $400 in lieu of her $843 share of reparation for the burglary, which the judge accepted Haenga had no means to pay.

The burglary, on September 30 last year, involved a 16-year-old female accomplice, who has since been dealt with by Youth Aid.

Haenga and the younger teen had been socialising with others at a Gisborne address. The group left the house together but, now knowing there would be no one at home, Haenga and her associate returned to burgle it.

Items taken included food, USB sticks, an electronic tablet and a pounamu necklace. The only thing recovered was the tablet.

While Haenga claimed she hadn’t taken the necklace, she was still responsible for its disappearance through her involvement in the burglary, the judge said.

She should give some thought as to whether she could assist in it being recovered and returned, the judge told her.

It was the loss of that item that had upset the complainants the most, the judge said.

The other offences occurred on September 23 when a bystander reported seeing Haenga fighting another girl in public and asked police to intervene.

When told she was under arrest, Haenga abused and tried to escape from an officer. She was caught but resisted by thrashing about and kicking out with her legs.

Her verbal abuse continued in a patrol car on the way to the police station. Arriving there, she kicked out at officers trying to get her out of the vehicle and spat on them.

Mr Lynch said Haenga’s aunt and uncle, with whom she was now living, were good people who had set up a charitable trust, one of the goals of which was to help youth offenders on the East Coast.

They were also caregivers for Oranga Tamariki.

Haenga would now do literacy and other courses and had no intention of returning to Gisborne, where her offending occurred, Mr Lynch said.

For his part in the theft of a jet ski and other offences, Andre Steve Hedge, 49, was jailed for seven months.

Hedge pleaded guilty to the theft, two charges of possessing drug utensils, for methamphetamine and cannabis, and two breaches of bail.

Judge Haamiora Raumati sentenced Hedge, who appeared via audiovisual-link from a prison remand unit where he has been since October last year after twice missing his scheduled sentencing, which resulted in the breach of bail charges.

Hedge and co-offenders took the jet ski from Gisborne aerodrome and delivered it to a prearranged buyer in Auckland.

Lawyer Leighvi Maynard said Hedge had no means of paying his $7500 share of the reparation sought for the unrecovered jet ski.

While Hedge had a criminal history, none of his previous offences was directly relevant to this sentencing, Judge Raumati said.

Mr Maynard said Hedge accepted a prison term was the appropriate outcome –– home detention was not an option. While on remand in custody, Hedge had been taking steps to address his drug addiction.

Taking account of the sentence imposed on one of Hedge’s co-offenders –– Cameron Roland Turnbull, 36 –– the judge set a starting point of 10 months imprisonment, reducing it by three months for Hedge’s guilty pleas.

Hedge will also be subject to release conditions for six months.

Patrick Arahanga, 34, was to spend no more time in jail having already served the equivalent of a nine-month prison term now imposed on him, the judge said.

The sentence was to cover two assaults on women, a charge of threatening behaviour and a breach of bail. Arahanga will be subject to release conditions for six months.

He was released from custody on bail last year when industrial action prevented his scheduled sentencings from going ahead and a risk arose of him ultimately serving too much time.

He had by then been imprisoned for as long as his anticipated sentence.

One of the assault charges and the charge of threatening behaviour arose out of an incident in April last year when Arahanga had a dispute with a friend over his use of her phone. He punched her in the mouth and when she walked away, he pursued her with a pole.

One of the woman’s neighbours intervened.

The other assault charge arose in July last year when he argued with a woman with whom he was at that time in a relationship.

The woman went to leave the room but Arahanga punched her on the wrist then stood over her yelling. He also threw a shoe at her, which struck her in the forearm.

The pair continued to argue as they left a property together. Arahanga slapped the woman over the head from behind. A bystander was concerned enough to approach and ask the woman if she needed help.

Arahanga grabbed his partner by the throat and told her to keep walking. Further down the street, the witness again stopped to see if the woman needed help. She got in that person’s car but only after Arahanga tried to stop her by putting her in a bear hug.

Judge Raumati noted Arahanga had prior convictions for similar offending but took account of his guilty pleas and the remorse he had since expressed.

He had been assessed as having good prospects of rehabilitation given certain commitments he had now made.

The judge set a sentence starting point of 10 months imprisonment, which he increased by two months for Arahanga’s history but reduced by three months for his guilty pleas and remorse.

An existing sentence of community work was cancelled.

A teenage offender has good prospects of rehabilitation now she has moved to Ruatoria, where she has prosocial family support, lawyer Michael Lynch says.

Messiah Mihi Lilian Haenga, 17, pleaded guilty to burglary, fighting in public, two assaults on police, and resisting police.

She received six months supervision, 100 hours community work and was ordered to make an emotional harm payment of $400 in lieu of her $843 share of reparation for the burglary, which the judge accepted Haenga had no means to pay.

The burglary, on September 30 last year, involved a 16-year-old female accomplice, who has since been dealt with by Youth Aid.

Haenga and the younger teen had been socialising with others at a Gisborne address. The group left the house together but, now knowing there would be no one at home, Haenga and her associate returned to burgle it.

Items taken included food, USB sticks, an electronic tablet and a pounamu necklace. The only thing recovered was the tablet.

While Haenga claimed she hadn’t taken the necklace, she was still responsible for its disappearance through her involvement in the burglary, the judge said.

She should give some thought as to whether she could assist in it being recovered and returned, the judge told her.

It was the loss of that item that had upset the complainants the most, the judge said.

The other offences occurred on September 23 when a bystander reported seeing Haenga fighting another girl in public and asked police to intervene.

When told she was under arrest, Haenga abused and tried to escape from an officer. She was caught but resisted by thrashing about and kicking out with her legs.

Her verbal abuse continued in a patrol car on the way to the police station. Arriving there, she kicked out at officers trying to get her out of the vehicle and spat on them.

Mr Lynch said Haenga’s aunt and uncle, with whom she was now living, were good people who had set up a charitable trust, one of the goals of which was to help youth offenders on the East Coast.

They were also caregivers for Oranga Tamariki.

Haenga would now do literacy and other courses and had no intention of returning to Gisborne, where her offending occurred, Mr Lynch said.

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