Most like idea of sensors to warn of tsunamis

Almost 80 percent of respondents said yes to this week’s webpoll question, “Would you like to see the Government invest in a network of sensors on the seafloor over the Hikurangi subduction zone, and a tsunami early-warning system?”

Responses though were surprisingly muted.

“Common sense and life-saving,” said one of the 78 percent, or 213 out of 273 respondents, who voted yes.

“Not all the population own cellphones,” said another.

One respondent in the “yes” camp found the idea “interesting”.

“How much will that cost the taxpayer or ratepayers?” they asked.

“Great idea when we could have 30 metre waves and we have a high rural population,” was a slightly ambiguous comment.

Another who voted “yes” said: “It could save lives, but the important thing is that all of us near the sea know to head for higher ground after a big quake.”

The railway was a more important priority for at least two of the 18 percent (50 respondents) who said no to the idea of investment in a network of sensors and a tsunami early-warning system.

“I would prefer the money be spent on a tourist train Wellington-Gisborne,” said one.

“Spend the money on rail for Gisborne instead,” chimed another.

A far better option would be to improve access to Gisborne after an emergency, was another response from the “no” camp.

One respondent took a more fatalistic stance: “Just let mother nature play its hand.”

Almost 80 percent of respondents said yes to this week’s webpoll question, “Would you like to see the Government invest in a network of sensors on the seafloor over the Hikurangi subduction zone, and a tsunami early-warning system?”

Responses though were surprisingly muted.

“Common sense and life-saving,” said one of the 78 percent, or 213 out of 273 respondents, who voted yes.

“Not all the population own cellphones,” said another.

One respondent in the “yes” camp found the idea “interesting”.

“How much will that cost the taxpayer or ratepayers?” they asked.

“Great idea when we could have 30 metre waves and we have a high rural population,” was a slightly ambiguous comment.

Another who voted “yes” said: “It could save lives, but the important thing is that all of us near the sea know to head for higher ground after a big quake.”

The railway was a more important priority for at least two of the 18 percent (50 respondents) who said no to the idea of investment in a network of sensors and a tsunami early-warning system.

“I would prefer the money be spent on a tourist train Wellington-Gisborne,” said one.

“Spend the money on rail for Gisborne instead,” chimed another.

A far better option would be to improve access to Gisborne after an emergency, was another response from the “no” camp.

One respondent took a more fatalistic stance: “Just let mother nature play its hand.”

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