‘Every child a taonga’

Plan’s vision to enable all children to enjoy, learn and thrive.

Plan’s vision to enable all children to enjoy, learn and thrive.

A presentation of the Ministry of Education’s strategic plan for early learning was delivered to educators in Gisborne this week.

The ministry is going around the country holding consultation hui (meetings) on the draft plan for early learning (children under-6).

It delivered a summary to local educators at The Emerald Hotel.

Education minister Chris Hipkins launched the draft plan, He taonga te tamaiti (Every child a taonga), in November.

It sets the direction for early learning for the next 10 years and is open for consultation until March 15.

Increasing teacher salaries and conditions, more adults for every baby and toddler, and moving towards 100 percent-qualified teachers are at the centre of the Government’s plan for early learning.

In April last year, Mr Hipkins appointed a ministerial advisory group to develop a strategic plan.

Alongside a larger sector reference group of academic experts, they worked with the ministry to draft up a plan with five main goals.

With an estimated cost of $3.5 billion across the 10 years, the plan sets out a range of goals and recommendations aimed at improving New Zealand’s education sector.

Key proposals for change include —

n Moving towards a 100 percent qualified teacher workforce in early childhood education centres.

n Improving the adult/child ratios for babies and toddlers.

n Increasing the consistency and levels of teacher salaries and conditions across the sector.

n A more planned approach to establishing new services, greater support and increased monitoring.

Teachers’ salaries and conditions will also be looked at, the report says.

The report says the vision for the plan is based on having an early learning system that enables every child to enjoy a good life, learn and thrive in high quality settings that support their identity, language and culture, and be valued by parents and whanau.

One of the ways the plan is seeking to support this is by co-designing an “appropriate funding model” with Te Kohanga Reo National Trust that is consistent with the findings of Waitangi Tribunal in respect of the trust’s current claim.

Ministry staff at the Gisborne hui said the trust and Crown continued to explore a way forward to address the Waitangi Tribunal claim WAI 2336.

“The trust has said, ‘given where we are in the process, it would not be appropriate for the trust to formally engage with the draft plan at this time’,” ministry staff said. “The priority of the trust remains focused on te reo Maori, whanau development and tending to the needs of tamariki/mokopuna to address the issues in its Treaty claim.”

The plan also looks to co-design an “appropriate funding model” with the NZ Playcentre Federation, and provide governance and management support for community-owned services.

“This would include more resources and training, as well as face-to-face support for indepth help,” the report says.

The ministry is seeking feedback on the proposed plan, which can be made in an online survey at www.conversation.education.govt.nz

A presentation of the Ministry of Education’s strategic plan for early learning was delivered to educators in Gisborne this week.

The ministry is going around the country holding consultation hui (meetings) on the draft plan for early learning (children under-6).

It delivered a summary to local educators at The Emerald Hotel.

Education minister Chris Hipkins launched the draft plan, He taonga te tamaiti (Every child a taonga), in November.

It sets the direction for early learning for the next 10 years and is open for consultation until March 15.

Increasing teacher salaries and conditions, more adults for every baby and toddler, and moving towards 100 percent-qualified teachers are at the centre of the Government’s plan for early learning.

In April last year, Mr Hipkins appointed a ministerial advisory group to develop a strategic plan.

Alongside a larger sector reference group of academic experts, they worked with the ministry to draft up a plan with five main goals.

With an estimated cost of $3.5 billion across the 10 years, the plan sets out a range of goals and recommendations aimed at improving New Zealand’s education sector.

Key proposals for change include —

n Moving towards a 100 percent qualified teacher workforce in early childhood education centres.

n Improving the adult/child ratios for babies and toddlers.

n Increasing the consistency and levels of teacher salaries and conditions across the sector.

n A more planned approach to establishing new services, greater support and increased monitoring.

Teachers’ salaries and conditions will also be looked at, the report says.

The report says the vision for the plan is based on having an early learning system that enables every child to enjoy a good life, learn and thrive in high quality settings that support their identity, language and culture, and be valued by parents and whanau.

One of the ways the plan is seeking to support this is by co-designing an “appropriate funding model” with Te Kohanga Reo National Trust that is consistent with the findings of Waitangi Tribunal in respect of the trust’s current claim.

Ministry staff at the Gisborne hui said the trust and Crown continued to explore a way forward to address the Waitangi Tribunal claim WAI 2336.

“The trust has said, ‘given where we are in the process, it would not be appropriate for the trust to formally engage with the draft plan at this time’,” ministry staff said. “The priority of the trust remains focused on te reo Maori, whanau development and tending to the needs of tamariki/mokopuna to address the issues in its Treaty claim.”

The plan also looks to co-design an “appropriate funding model” with the NZ Playcentre Federation, and provide governance and management support for community-owned services.

“This would include more resources and training, as well as face-to-face support for indepth help,” the report says.

The ministry is seeking feedback on the proposed plan, which can be made in an online survey at www.conversation.education.govt.nz

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