Questions about Titirangi work

Why not use community service workers, councillor asks.

Why not use community service workers, councillor asks.

Community service workers should be used for maintenance work on Titirangi/Kaiti Hill as they are used in other centres, says a Gisborne district councillor.

Andy Cranston told fellow members of the Future Tairawhiti committee that Department of Corrections community service workers had been used on Taupo mountain bike tracks and a similar route in Picton.

They were “massive projects . . . surely Titirangi could do the same”.

Two women were doing the work on Titirangi through the summer.

‘‘It’s a massive job for two women,” he said.

“We used to see community service workers all the time along Wainui Road. It’s something we could do.’’

Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said extensive discussions had been held with the Corrections Department over the years but there were a lot of constraints on what community service workers could do from the government department, and because of health and safety issues.

Mr Cranston asked if the inability to use community service workers in Gisborne had developed from ‘‘a personal opinion’’.

“The projects in Picton and Taupo were far more work and safety conscious than the weeding we are asking about.”

The Titirangi maintenance work required spades but the other two centres needed ‘‘chainsaws and all sorts of things”, he said.

“Why is it an issue here but not in Taupo and Picton?’’

The subject of maintenance of Titirangi was originally raised by Larry Foster.

He said he was disappointed by the state of newly-planted trees on the main track up Titirangi on the north-western face. They were becoming smothered by vines.

Mr Foster conceded the holiday season may have been a factor. He called for maintenance budgets to be increased annually to maintain new and old tracks.

Major maintenance was required, including where newly-planted trees were overgrown, and there were weeds everywhere.

‘‘A bit of work needs to be done to maintain the trees to make sure they don’t get suffocated.”

Mr Foster said Titirangi was a showcase for the region.

Director of liveable communities Andrew White said Titirangi was “a key presentation site for us, which needs to look really good”.

Maintenance work was sufficient, he said.

Titirangi was managed in conjunction with Ngati Oneone and ongoing maintenance would be revisited in the next long-term plan.

“But at this point I’m pretty happy with how things are proceeding.”

Community service workers should be used for maintenance work on Titirangi/Kaiti Hill as they are used in other centres, says a Gisborne district councillor.

Andy Cranston told fellow members of the Future Tairawhiti committee that Department of Corrections community service workers had been used on Taupo mountain bike tracks and a similar route in Picton.

They were “massive projects . . . surely Titirangi could do the same”.

Two women were doing the work on Titirangi through the summer.

‘‘It’s a massive job for two women,” he said.

“We used to see community service workers all the time along Wainui Road. It’s something we could do.’’

Council chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said extensive discussions had been held with the Corrections Department over the years but there were a lot of constraints on what community service workers could do from the government department, and because of health and safety issues.

Mr Cranston asked if the inability to use community service workers in Gisborne had developed from ‘‘a personal opinion’’.

“The projects in Picton and Taupo were far more work and safety conscious than the weeding we are asking about.”

The Titirangi maintenance work required spades but the other two centres needed ‘‘chainsaws and all sorts of things”, he said.

“Why is it an issue here but not in Taupo and Picton?’’

The subject of maintenance of Titirangi was originally raised by Larry Foster.

He said he was disappointed by the state of newly-planted trees on the main track up Titirangi on the north-western face. They were becoming smothered by vines.

Mr Foster conceded the holiday season may have been a factor. He called for maintenance budgets to be increased annually to maintain new and old tracks.

Major maintenance was required, including where newly-planted trees were overgrown, and there were weeds everywhere.

‘‘A bit of work needs to be done to maintain the trees to make sure they don’t get suffocated.”

Mr Foster said Titirangi was a showcase for the region.

Director of liveable communities Andrew White said Titirangi was “a key presentation site for us, which needs to look really good”.

Maintenance work was sufficient, he said.

Titirangi was managed in conjunction with Ngati Oneone and ongoing maintenance would be revisited in the next long-term plan.

“But at this point I’m pretty happy with how things are proceeding.”

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