Chance for rangatahi to learn about whenua

FIXING THE WHENUA: Students eager to learn, back from left, Arapeta Beach, Alamayne Raroa-Keen, Rua Te Purei Te Kani, David Boyce, and Joseph Tawhara. Front from left, Employment Minister Willie Jackson, students Raiha Blane, Hinemaurea Ngarimu-Kaiwai and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage. Pictures by Liam Clayton
WELCOME: Joe Harawira helping welcome MPs Willie Jackson (standing behind Harawira), Eugenie Sage and others onto Te Heapera Marae to launch Ka Hao Te Rangatahi.

KORERO: Department of Conservation supervisor Charles Barrie at Te Heapera Marae thanking everyone involved for working together to get the programme made.
Employment Minister Willie Jackson.
WORKING TOGETHER: From left, East Coast MP Anne Tolley, Employment Minister Willie Jackson and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage all hope for the best.

Ruatoria EIT Ka Hao te Rangatahi programme - BACK: Arapeta Beach, Alamayne Raroa-Keen, Rua Te Purei Te Kani, Joesph Tawhara, David Boyce. FRONT: Raiha Blane, Hinemaurea Ngarimu-Kaiwai.

A new training programme with hopes of healing the whenua (land) through educating rangatahi was launched at Ruatoria on Friday.

The programme, Ka Hao te Rangatahi is designed to target the Waiapu catchment while developing young people’s skills through conservation and erosion management.

He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) is supporting the programme as both HPR and Ka Hao te Rangatahi share a strong focus on supporting rangatahi to be ready for real opportunities to work and contribute to their communities on the coast.

The programme was launched by Employment Minister Willie Jackson and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage at Te Heapera Marae.

It has been developed for 16 to 24- year-olds who are not in employment, education or training and need tailored support to connect with employment.

Willie Jackson said the Labour-led government was committed to equipping young people with the skills and tailored support to get into real and sustained jobs in their own communities.

“Ka Hao te Rangatahi does just that.

“This programme is an example of a community working together to deliver for local young people.

“It will enable these young people to thrive and become advocates for mana whenua, while they upskill for local employment options,” Mr Jackson said.

The HPR support includes resourcing a full-time pastoral care coordinator to work directly with the students and connect them with the right tools.

Eugenie Sage said the new programme was well supported by the Ruatoria and wider Waiapu community, and that enthusiasm was powerful.

“Learning about the land and how to protect nature sets young people up with great skills and a stronger connection to both whenua and their community.” she said.

“They will learn everything from fencing and operating farm machinery to pest management and protecting native birds and other wildlife in the Waiapu catchment.

“Young people in the programme will also have the chance to develop skills such as getting a driver’s licence, te reo o te taiao (language of the environment) and outdoor first aid,” Mrs Sage said.

Student Hinemaurea Ngarimu-Kaiwai said she liked learning more about the whenua.

“When you learn about it you realise how much work needs to be done to fix it,” she said.

Student David Boyce said he liked learning about Waiapu, the history and the significance it had to the iwi.

“Before this I was working on a farm, doing fencing and breaking in horses.

“I hope we can make better swimming holes, cleaner rivers and stop the erosion from happening,” he said.

East Coast MP Anne Tolley said the course was locally based and locally designed which meant it was going to have more chance at being effective.

“It gives them skills to help them look after their own land, which they want to do, they want to take ownership of it.

“It gives an opportunity to young people. It’s all about getting young people focussed on earning a living, supporting themselves and getting some qualifications,” Mrs Tolley said.

Based in Ruatoria/Waiapu, the course content is delivered by Eastern Institute of Technology (EIT) tutors with additional support provided by the Department of Conservation, Nga Whenua Rahui the Gisborne District Council and local community leaders, experts and employers.

A new training programme with hopes of healing the whenua (land) through educating rangatahi was launched at Ruatoria on Friday.

The programme, Ka Hao te Rangatahi is designed to target the Waiapu catchment while developing young people’s skills through conservation and erosion management.

He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) is supporting the programme as both HPR and Ka Hao te Rangatahi share a strong focus on supporting rangatahi to be ready for real opportunities to work and contribute to their communities on the coast.

The programme was launched by Employment Minister Willie Jackson and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage at Te Heapera Marae.

It has been developed for 16 to 24- year-olds who are not in employment, education or training and need tailored support to connect with employment.

Willie Jackson said the Labour-led government was committed to equipping young people with the skills and tailored support to get into real and sustained jobs in their own communities.

“Ka Hao te Rangatahi does just that.

“This programme is an example of a community working together to deliver for local young people.

“It will enable these young people to thrive and become advocates for mana whenua, while they upskill for local employment options,” Mr Jackson said.

The HPR support includes resourcing a full-time pastoral care coordinator to work directly with the students and connect them with the right tools.

Eugenie Sage said the new programme was well supported by the Ruatoria and wider Waiapu community, and that enthusiasm was powerful.

“Learning about the land and how to protect nature sets young people up with great skills and a stronger connection to both whenua and their community.” she said.

“They will learn everything from fencing and operating farm machinery to pest management and protecting native birds and other wildlife in the Waiapu catchment.

“Young people in the programme will also have the chance to develop skills such as getting a driver’s licence, te reo o te taiao (language of the environment) and outdoor first aid,” Mrs Sage said.

Student Hinemaurea Ngarimu-Kaiwai said she liked learning more about the whenua.

“When you learn about it you realise how much work needs to be done to fix it,” she said.

Student David Boyce said he liked learning about Waiapu, the history and the significance it had to the iwi.

“Before this I was working on a farm, doing fencing and breaking in horses.

“I hope we can make better swimming holes, cleaner rivers and stop the erosion from happening,” he said.

East Coast MP Anne Tolley said the course was locally based and locally designed which meant it was going to have more chance at being effective.

“It gives them skills to help them look after their own land, which they want to do, they want to take ownership of it.

“It gives an opportunity to young people. It’s all about getting young people focussed on earning a living, supporting themselves and getting some qualifications,” Mrs Tolley said.

Based in Ruatoria/Waiapu, the course content is delivered by Eastern Institute of Technology (EIT) tutors with additional support provided by the Department of Conservation, Nga Whenua Rahui the Gisborne District Council and local community leaders, experts and employers.

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