Clean ocean mission

Givealittle page set up to buy Seabin for harbour

Givealittle page set up to buy Seabin for harbour

ON A MISSION: Fishing enthusiasts Barry Henry and daughter Melissa made it a family mission to help clean up the ocean by getting a Seabin for Gisborne’s inner harbour. Mr Henry died in December and Ms Henry is continuing the $7000 quest through a givealittle page. Pictures supplied
Melissa Henry


A Gisborne woman has reignited a father-daughter mission to help clean up the inner harbour.

Melissa Henry has set up a givealittle page to get a $7000 Seabin installed in the Gisborne wharf — a move welcomed by Eastland Port.

“The port is awaiting the delivery date for up to four of its own units,” said port general manager Andrew Gaddum.

“Ms Henry’s initiative is a good one and the port is more than happy to help with the Seabin’s installation.”

A Seabin is a floating bin with a submersible pump that filters water to collect up to 20 kilograms of rubbish, oil and microplastics in places such as marinas and ports.

Ms Henry, 22, said the idea originated when she was out in father Barry Henry’s boat and they saw how much rubbish there was in the port.

She talked with him about the litter and saw the Seabin Project on social media.

“We pondered on the idea, then decided to actually make something of it. Dad and I started it together; it was our little mission,” she said.

When her father died in December, Ms Henry stopped pursuing it for a while, then decided to finish it and “make it his legacy”.

Ms Henry said she hoped it would show the community there were simple and effective methods for cleaning up waterways.

“It doesn’t have to be extreme to do your bit.”

New Zealand’s first Seabin was installed in Auckland’s Viaduct Harbour.

Seabins cost $7000 and that is why there were not many around the country, she said.

“Any donation is appreciated so please don’t give more than you can afford as we’re confident that little by little we can all band together to make this happen.”

Ms Henry encourages people to think of preventative measures for marine litter.

“I just want people to become aware and conscious of the environment.”

The Seabin Project was started by Australians Andrew Turton and Pete Ceglinski in 2015 when they were surfing and saw how much litter there was in the ocean.

The Seabin Project website says its mission is to have pollution-free oceans for future generations.

“The team at Seabin Project understood that the seabins are not the solution but education is the real solution in the end.”

To donate to Ms Henry’s Seabin Project, go to givealittle crowdfunding page and search seabin.

As of yesterday, $946 had been raised.

A Gisborne woman has reignited a father-daughter mission to help clean up the inner harbour.

Melissa Henry has set up a givealittle page to get a $7000 Seabin installed in the Gisborne wharf — a move welcomed by Eastland Port.

“The port is awaiting the delivery date for up to four of its own units,” said port general manager Andrew Gaddum.

“Ms Henry’s initiative is a good one and the port is more than happy to help with the Seabin’s installation.”

A Seabin is a floating bin with a submersible pump that filters water to collect up to 20 kilograms of rubbish, oil and microplastics in places such as marinas and ports.

Ms Henry, 22, said the idea originated when she was out in father Barry Henry’s boat and they saw how much rubbish there was in the port.

She talked with him about the litter and saw the Seabin Project on social media.

“We pondered on the idea, then decided to actually make something of it. Dad and I started it together; it was our little mission,” she said.

When her father died in December, Ms Henry stopped pursuing it for a while, then decided to finish it and “make it his legacy”.

Ms Henry said she hoped it would show the community there were simple and effective methods for cleaning up waterways.

“It doesn’t have to be extreme to do your bit.”

New Zealand’s first Seabin was installed in Auckland’s Viaduct Harbour.

Seabins cost $7000 and that is why there were not many around the country, she said.

“Any donation is appreciated so please don’t give more than you can afford as we’re confident that little by little we can all band together to make this happen.”

Ms Henry encourages people to think of preventative measures for marine litter.

“I just want people to become aware and conscious of the environment.”

The Seabin Project was started by Australians Andrew Turton and Pete Ceglinski in 2015 when they were surfing and saw how much litter there was in the ocean.

The Seabin Project website says its mission is to have pollution-free oceans for future generations.

“The team at Seabin Project understood that the seabins are not the solution but education is the real solution in the end.”

To donate to Ms Henry’s Seabin Project, go to givealittle crowdfunding page and search seabin.

As of yesterday, $946 had been raised.

‘If we can have rubbish bins on land, why not have them in the ocean?’: A Seabin unit is a floating debris interception device designed to be installed in the water of marinas, yacht clubs, ports and any water body with a calm environment. Water is sucked in from the surface and passes through a catch bag inside the Seabin, with a submersible water pump capable of displacing 25,000 litres per hour, plugged directly into a 110 or 220 volt outlet. The water is then pumped back into the marina leaving litter and debris trapped in the catch bag to be disposed of properly. It catches an estimated 1.5kg of floating debris per day and the catch bag can hold up to 20kg. It costs less than $1 a day to run. Picture supplied

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Sarah - 26 days ago
https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/the-seabin-project

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