Hikurangi bracket at Matatini includes classic composition

HIKURANGI HAKA: Ngati Porou are renowned for haka taparahi, or haka performed without weaponry. Hikurangi adhered to the displayed the style that is distinct to Ngati Porou. Pictures by Te Matatini Incorporated Society.
IN THE LEAD: Kaitataki wahine, or female leader, Marcia Pohatu-Brown leads Hikurangi during the whakaeke, or entrance item, of their performance bracket.
LEGACY: Maria Smith shows that the Hikurangi legacy, which is over 80 years old, continues.

Their maunga is the first to see the sun and yesterday they were the first Tairawhiti group to take the stage at Te Matatini ki Te Ao.

Hikurangi of Ngati Porou, named after the ancestral mountain, were the second group on stage for day one, the Te Ihu section, of the national kapa haka extravaganza at Westpac Stadium in Wellington.

Hikurangi, established in 1934, is one of the oldest groups in the country.

One of the highlights of their performance was a rendition of the classic waiata, Kei Tangi a Big Ben, written by one of the great Maori composers, Tuini Ngawai of Ngati Porou, and founder of Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu kapa haka.

The waiata pays tribute to the rural and agricultural history in Ngati Porou and in particular, life in a shearing gang and the personalities that are a part of the woolshed.

The item was also a tribute to Tuini’s mokopuna, Kohi Coleman, a stalwart of Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu kapa haka who passed away last year.

The Raukumara Ranges was also a theme covered during their bracket.

Prevalent throughout day one performances were acknowledgements of the Ringatu faith and its founder Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki, of Rongowhakaata descent.

A number of teams paid tribute to the faith’s 150th anniversary, which was marked last July at Rangiwaho Marae near Muriwai.

Today four Tairawhiti teams compete in the Te Haumi section. The first local team is Te Whanau a Kai of Waituhi, followed by Tu Te Manawa Maurea of Rongowhakaata, and winners of the last festival, Whangara Mai Tawhiti of Ngati Konohi.

Closing out the day will be the inaugural champions of the competition and five-time winners, Waihirere.

Also performing today will be the second of the Wairoa teams, Te Rerenga Kotuku.

First timers to the competition, Matangirau — also of Wairoa — performed yesterday.

Their maunga is the first to see the sun and yesterday they were the first Tairawhiti group to take the stage at Te Matatini ki Te Ao.

Hikurangi of Ngati Porou, named after the ancestral mountain, were the second group on stage for day one, the Te Ihu section, of the national kapa haka extravaganza at Westpac Stadium in Wellington.

Hikurangi, established in 1934, is one of the oldest groups in the country.

One of the highlights of their performance was a rendition of the classic waiata, Kei Tangi a Big Ben, written by one of the great Maori composers, Tuini Ngawai of Ngati Porou, and founder of Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu kapa haka.

The waiata pays tribute to the rural and agricultural history in Ngati Porou and in particular, life in a shearing gang and the personalities that are a part of the woolshed.

The item was also a tribute to Tuini’s mokopuna, Kohi Coleman, a stalwart of Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu kapa haka who passed away last year.

The Raukumara Ranges was also a theme covered during their bracket.

Prevalent throughout day one performances were acknowledgements of the Ringatu faith and its founder Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki, of Rongowhakaata descent.

A number of teams paid tribute to the faith’s 150th anniversary, which was marked last July at Rangiwaho Marae near Muriwai.

Today four Tairawhiti teams compete in the Te Haumi section. The first local team is Te Whanau a Kai of Waituhi, followed by Tu Te Manawa Maurea of Rongowhakaata, and winners of the last festival, Whangara Mai Tawhiti of Ngati Konohi.

Closing out the day will be the inaugural champions of the competition and five-time winners, Waihirere.

Also performing today will be the second of the Wairoa teams, Te Rerenga Kotuku.

First timers to the competition, Matangirau — also of Wairoa — performed yesterday.

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