Date window for rocket launch with heaviest load

LATEST LAUNCH: Rocket Lab’s Electron space vehicle ready to launch research equipment into orbit, scheduled for some time in the next two weeks. Picture by Rocket Lab

Rocket Lab’s Mahia rocket launch site will be back in action inside the next two weeks, following a delay to its latest planned launch.

The United States-based company had intended to launch the RF Risk Reduction Deployment Demonstration (R3D2) mission for the US’s military research government agency DARPA last month but the launch window was adjusted to the second half of March to provide the prime contractor with additional time to complete payload validation and verification.

Rocket Lab has designated a new 14-day window for the launch, from March 17 to March 30.

Within the window, lift-off will be scheduled between 11.30am and 3.30pm.

Lars Hoffman, Rocket Lab’s senior vice-president of global launch services, said the R3D2 mission highlights Electron’s (Rocket Lab’s orbital launch vehicle) critical role in enabling small satellite innovation by delivering responsive and tailored launch services to rapidly “space-qualify” new technologies.

“Small satellite technology is evolving at breakneck pace, and the R3D2 mission is a prime example of the significant capabilities small satellites can deliver now that frequent and reliable access to space is a reality on Electron.

“Our team has racked up three orbital missions and deployed 24 satellites already, but the R3D2 mission is particularly exciting. It marks the first dedicated Rocket Lab mission carrying a single satellite that maximises Electron’s nominal lift capability of 150kg.”

Live video coverage of the launch will be available on Rocket Lab’s website at https://www.rocketlabusa.com/live-stream/

For real-time updates on launch day, follow Rocket Lab on Twitter @RocketLab

During the launch window a sea exclusion zone would be in place from 9.30am to 4pm on launch days.

Rocket Lab’s Mahia rocket launch site will be back in action inside the next two weeks, following a delay to its latest planned launch.

The United States-based company had intended to launch the RF Risk Reduction Deployment Demonstration (R3D2) mission for the US’s military research government agency DARPA last month but the launch window was adjusted to the second half of March to provide the prime contractor with additional time to complete payload validation and verification.

Rocket Lab has designated a new 14-day window for the launch, from March 17 to March 30.

Within the window, lift-off will be scheduled between 11.30am and 3.30pm.

Lars Hoffman, Rocket Lab’s senior vice-president of global launch services, said the R3D2 mission highlights Electron’s (Rocket Lab’s orbital launch vehicle) critical role in enabling small satellite innovation by delivering responsive and tailored launch services to rapidly “space-qualify” new technologies.

“Small satellite technology is evolving at breakneck pace, and the R3D2 mission is a prime example of the significant capabilities small satellites can deliver now that frequent and reliable access to space is a reality on Electron.

“Our team has racked up three orbital missions and deployed 24 satellites already, but the R3D2 mission is particularly exciting. It marks the first dedicated Rocket Lab mission carrying a single satellite that maximises Electron’s nominal lift capability of 150kg.”

Live video coverage of the launch will be available on Rocket Lab’s website at https://www.rocketlabusa.com/live-stream/

For real-time updates on launch day, follow Rocket Lab on Twitter @RocketLab

During the launch window a sea exclusion zone would be in place from 9.30am to 4pm on launch days.

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Will - 11 days ago
DARPA has some of the most highly classified US Military Industrial Complex contracts and specialises in chemical and biological weapon delivery systems, as well as climate engineering. So which one is this satellite going to be used to deliver - biological and chemical weapons, or to engineer the climate?

Robert Sutton, Auckland - 10 days ago
Does the above comment indicate that someone exists in Gisborne?
Or something else?