Shaping our future

Council to discuss spatial plan document

Council to discuss spatial plan document

Climate change, biodiversity loss, the availability of water, infrastructure and where future development should take place will all be included in the spatial plan to be produced for Gisborne District Council.

A community engagement and consultation programme for the spatial plan, which will shape how the district is developed over the next 30 years, will be presented for approval to the Future Tairawhiti committee (the full council) tomorrow.

An overview to a draft discussion document for the plan says that climate change and natural hazards have the potential to profoundly affect our physical environment and settlements.

“The district is experiencing a critical biodiversity loss that must be addressed through ecological restoration and protection.

“The availability and quality constrains our development, we must look at opportunities to secure long-term water availability for all our communities, “ the overview says.

“The use and supply of energy will change as we move away from a carbon economy and rapidly evolving technology will change the way we connect with each other and do business.”

Population growth in the city will require more areas for development, redevelopment of existing areas and new or upgraded infrastructure.

Developing a safe and efficient transport network will be central to keeping communities connected with each other, markets and the rest of the country.

“We need to improve the management of all forms of waste produced in Tairawhiti and to ensure that the regional economy is sustainable, resilient and addresses the needs of our communities.”

There is the opportunity to enhance the recreation network.

The document notes that nearly half the population is Maori and it is important to reflect Te Ao Maori in planning. It has identified the opportunity to further celebrate our rich cultural heritage and support iwi aspirations such as supporting the development of Maori-owned land, local tourism and housing development opportunities.

“The passion and commitment of our people is the single most important opportunity to design our place so it reflects our needs, aspirations and identity,” the overview says.

The price tag of making the community more resilient to natural hazards and climate change will be the most costly challenges our community will face.

The likelihood of some natural hazards such as erosion, flooding and drought is increasing.

“The longer we put off action the more expensive it will become and we currently do not know how we will pay for required action,” the overview says.

Other items flagged for consideration are high energy costs, road, sea, air and rail transport, a severe labour shortage, and future growth.

The district is expected to have growth of at least 4000 people and initiatives are needed to ensure adequate supply of housing, infrastructure and development.

“We need to support developers with clearer direction and more certainty through rules and guidance in the Tairawhiti Resource Management Plan,” the document says.

The committee will be asked to approve the communication and engagement plan involving targeted engagement with major stakeholders, council “cuppas” with communities, theme workshops and student workshops.

Wider community consultation is scheduled for July to August.

The draft plan is scheduled to be completed by the end of May.

Climate change, biodiversity loss, the availability of water, infrastructure and where future development should take place will all be included in the spatial plan to be produced for Gisborne District Council.

A community engagement and consultation programme for the spatial plan, which will shape how the district is developed over the next 30 years, will be presented for approval to the Future Tairawhiti committee (the full council) tomorrow.

An overview to a draft discussion document for the plan says that climate change and natural hazards have the potential to profoundly affect our physical environment and settlements.

“The district is experiencing a critical biodiversity loss that must be addressed through ecological restoration and protection.

“The availability and quality constrains our development, we must look at opportunities to secure long-term water availability for all our communities, “ the overview says.

“The use and supply of energy will change as we move away from a carbon economy and rapidly evolving technology will change the way we connect with each other and do business.”

Population growth in the city will require more areas for development, redevelopment of existing areas and new or upgraded infrastructure.

Developing a safe and efficient transport network will be central to keeping communities connected with each other, markets and the rest of the country.

“We need to improve the management of all forms of waste produced in Tairawhiti and to ensure that the regional economy is sustainable, resilient and addresses the needs of our communities.”

There is the opportunity to enhance the recreation network.

The document notes that nearly half the population is Maori and it is important to reflect Te Ao Maori in planning. It has identified the opportunity to further celebrate our rich cultural heritage and support iwi aspirations such as supporting the development of Maori-owned land, local tourism and housing development opportunities.

“The passion and commitment of our people is the single most important opportunity to design our place so it reflects our needs, aspirations and identity,” the overview says.

The price tag of making the community more resilient to natural hazards and climate change will be the most costly challenges our community will face.

The likelihood of some natural hazards such as erosion, flooding and drought is increasing.

“The longer we put off action the more expensive it will become and we currently do not know how we will pay for required action,” the overview says.

Other items flagged for consideration are high energy costs, road, sea, air and rail transport, a severe labour shortage, and future growth.

The district is expected to have growth of at least 4000 people and initiatives are needed to ensure adequate supply of housing, infrastructure and development.

“We need to support developers with clearer direction and more certainty through rules and guidance in the Tairawhiti Resource Management Plan,” the document says.

The committee will be asked to approve the communication and engagement plan involving targeted engagement with major stakeholders, council “cuppas” with communities, theme workshops and student workshops.

Wider community consultation is scheduled for July to August.

The draft plan is scheduled to be completed by the end of May.

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