Hawaiki Turanga

Work to start on new statue at the Cut. Picture by Liam Clayton
Statue at the cut
Statue at the cut

Building has began on the long awaited and controversial Hawaiki Turanga sculpture near the Waikanae Stream mouth.

The 6.3 metres high and 16 metres wide sculpture is based on Ruapani, a paramount Chief of Turanganui-a- Kiwa who has a common thread to all tribes of Tairawhiti.

The sculpture has two separate pieces, these being the main sculpture representing the front of a wharenui (the Wharenui sculpture) and a poutokomanawa (the centre ridge post of a Wharenui) representing Ruapani. There have been discussions since 1998 on using suitable artwork to acknowledge traditional ownership of the land under ‘‘the Watties Accord”.

A contract to create a Hawaiki Turanga sculpture was awarded in 2011 and a contract signed in 2014. The Gisborne Herald reported in 2013 the estimated cost of the sculpture was $355,000 with Gisborne District Council contributing $100,000.

Harbourview Apartments’ residents were angered over a perceived lack of consultation by Gisborne District Council and complained that the consent application was not notified.

Council tried to try to reach an agreement between the residents and Rongowhakaata and independent legal opinion supported council’s handling of the matter.

Building has began on the long awaited and controversial Hawaiki Turanga sculpture near the Waikanae Stream mouth.

The 6.3 metres high and 16 metres wide sculpture is based on Ruapani, a paramount Chief of Turanganui-a- Kiwa who has a common thread to all tribes of Tairawhiti.

The sculpture has two separate pieces, these being the main sculpture representing the front of a wharenui (the Wharenui sculpture) and a poutokomanawa (the centre ridge post of a Wharenui) representing Ruapani. There have been discussions since 1998 on using suitable artwork to acknowledge traditional ownership of the land under ‘‘the Watties Accord”.

A contract to create a Hawaiki Turanga sculpture was awarded in 2011 and a contract signed in 2014. The Gisborne Herald reported in 2013 the estimated cost of the sculpture was $355,000 with Gisborne District Council contributing $100,000.

Harbourview Apartments’ residents were angered over a perceived lack of consultation by Gisborne District Council and complained that the consent application was not notified.

Council tried to try to reach an agreement between the residents and Rongowhakaata and independent legal opinion supported council’s handling of the matter.

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