Grumbles focus on roads

Frustrations aired at Tokomaru Bay ‘council cuppa’ meeting

Frustrations aired at Tokomaru Bay ‘council cuppa’ meeting

Main issues for Tokomaru Bay residents at last night’s “council cuppa” meeting centred around roads.

They included progress on the sea wall drop outs, water pooling by Cafe 35 and a large sump hole left uncovered on Arthur Street.

Around 20 residents met at the Senior Citizens Hall in Tokomaru Bay for the first of the “Council Cuppas 2019” — community engagement meetings being held all around Gisborne over the next month.

Led by retiring Mayor Meng Foon, and attended by district councillors and Gisborne District Council staff, the meetings focus on issues each areas have, and touch on the main issue for the whole region — Gisborne’s spatial plan for 2050.

GDC strategic planning manager Jo Noble said the spatial plan was about making sure the region grew in the right direction over the next 30 years and GDC wanted community engagement from everyone.

Tokomaru Bay resident Murray LeCompte wanted a 1.2 metre wide hole outside his property in Arthur Street covered up. It was a gap left for a sump that had never been finished. Mr LeCompte said it was a hazard.

He had seen a child riding a bike, who saw the hole, swerved to avoid it and was narrowly missed by a passing car.

Tokomaru Bay resident Steve Aspden thanked Mr Foon for his service to the council, and his support of the goldfish farm in Tokomaru Bay.

Mr Aspden then moved on to a problem he had been trying to get answers about for “200 days”. He kept getting “fobbed off” by council, he said.

Every time it rained water pooled at the corner by Cafe 35 on State Highway 35.

It was a deadly corner when that happened, he said.

Mr Aspden was supported by others at the meeting around this issue.

“The water hazard is exacerbated because of the raised concrete of the pedestrian refuge in the middle.”

Mr Aspden said whoever did the drainage was trying to get water to go uphill.

“No water should be crossing a state highway.”

He was frustrated by the lack of response, with emails and phone calls to GDC seeing him passed from one department to the other, he said.

Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield was at last night’s meeting and was able to help Mr Aspden with more information.

It was a New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) issue because it was on a state highway, said Mr Hadfield.

“I’ll make sure this gets passed to NZTA. Leave it to me.”

Mr Hadfield said it was a land drainage problem, and landowners close to that corner would be spoken to as there would be a “cost share situation”.

Tokomaru Bay resident Vicki Raroa wanted to know what was happening with the sea wall.

Mr Hadfield confirmed only the four dropouts were being repaired, with an estimated time frame of three to four month to completion.

This was being funded 92 percent by NZTA and eight percent from the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF).

Main issues for Tokomaru Bay residents at last night’s “council cuppa” meeting centred around roads.

They included progress on the sea wall drop outs, water pooling by Cafe 35 and a large sump hole left uncovered on Arthur Street.

Around 20 residents met at the Senior Citizens Hall in Tokomaru Bay for the first of the “Council Cuppas 2019” — community engagement meetings being held all around Gisborne over the next month.

Led by retiring Mayor Meng Foon, and attended by district councillors and Gisborne District Council staff, the meetings focus on issues each areas have, and touch on the main issue for the whole region — Gisborne’s spatial plan for 2050.

GDC strategic planning manager Jo Noble said the spatial plan was about making sure the region grew in the right direction over the next 30 years and GDC wanted community engagement from everyone.

Tokomaru Bay resident Murray LeCompte wanted a 1.2 metre wide hole outside his property in Arthur Street covered up. It was a gap left for a sump that had never been finished. Mr LeCompte said it was a hazard.

He had seen a child riding a bike, who saw the hole, swerved to avoid it and was narrowly missed by a passing car.

Tokomaru Bay resident Steve Aspden thanked Mr Foon for his service to the council, and his support of the goldfish farm in Tokomaru Bay.

Mr Aspden then moved on to a problem he had been trying to get answers about for “200 days”. He kept getting “fobbed off” by council, he said.

Every time it rained water pooled at the corner by Cafe 35 on State Highway 35.

It was a deadly corner when that happened, he said.

Mr Aspden was supported by others at the meeting around this issue.

“The water hazard is exacerbated because of the raised concrete of the pedestrian refuge in the middle.”

Mr Aspden said whoever did the drainage was trying to get water to go uphill.

“No water should be crossing a state highway.”

He was frustrated by the lack of response, with emails and phone calls to GDC seeing him passed from one department to the other, he said.

Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield was at last night’s meeting and was able to help Mr Aspden with more information.

It was a New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) issue because it was on a state highway, said Mr Hadfield.

“I’ll make sure this gets passed to NZTA. Leave it to me.”

Mr Hadfield said it was a land drainage problem, and landowners close to that corner would be spoken to as there would be a “cost share situation”.

Tokomaru Bay resident Vicki Raroa wanted to know what was happening with the sea wall.

Mr Hadfield confirmed only the four dropouts were being repaired, with an estimated time frame of three to four month to completion.

This was being funded 92 percent by NZTA and eight percent from the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF).

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