Housing vision

Project aiming ‘for everyone to have a place to call home’.

Project aiming ‘for everyone to have a place to call home’.

HOMES FOR OUR PEOPLE: Oasis Community Church Ahuru Mowai Housing Project trustees (from left) Henry Huriwai, director Lizz Crawford and pastors Jose and Tom Crawford aim to put more people into their own homes. Picture by Paul Rickard

Ahuru Mowai Housing Project has officially launched plans for building module eco housing to home families most in need in the district.

The project is being driven by Oasis Community Church, formerly Mega Life Church, with the double aim of increasing ownership of energy-efficient homes and boosting employment.

Ahuru Mowai plans to build seven module homes in Ida Road (Kaiti) and two others in Wainui.

A Wainui Road house owned by the church will be sold to co-fund the project, says project director Lizz Crawford.

Ahuru Mowai is motivated by the housing crisis and poverty levels in the country.

“It is also a time to show our humanity,” says Ms Crawford. “Poverty Bay has the highest rate of whanau or families in need of healthy, affordable housing to rent or own.

‘‘Our vision is for everyone to have a place to call home in Aotearoa.”

The project will feature Green Magic Homes from Mexico and there is also research being done into Earthcube houses from Vietnam.

Green Magic Homes structures are covered by soil and rich greenery, making them energy-efficient and energy-saving while keeping a temperature-balanced interior. Earthcube houses are made of single-use containers.

Ahuru Mowai has done its research, says Ms Crawford.

“The foreign homes are cheaper, especially if whanau are trained to do some aspects themselves.”

A New Zealand Green Magic house had been built in Horokiwi, Lower Hutt and in the next few months, people would be undergoing training on how to build these.

“We will then buy into our own Green Magic home and start selling modules of which we get an income stream.

“The Green Magic home we buy will become the first training base for a Gisborne team who can put the modules together.”

Having been told the Provincial Growth Fund was not available as the Government already funded housing through KiwiBuild, Ahuru Mowai will seek funding from community providers.

Ahuru Mowai is identifying those most in need, many of them on the East Coast.

Ms Crawford said from five workshops they had held, 90 percent of attendees indicated their desire to be home owners.

There were a lot of people attempting to find their own solutions— from the establishment of papakainga (a collective way of Maori housing development) to different types of building including earth-rammed, straw bale, container homes and new technology.

‘‘We’re going to have something to help everyone — from financial literacy to those who have already been successful in helping homeless in their communities.

“We’re talking about housing solutions. We are not a social housing provider.

“It’s about working out solutions so you can find a home to own for you and your family — community housing.

'Hoping to have homes ready within the next year'

“The project, in its entirety, requires not only tradies but working together with social services and other providers to provide employment, income, financial and home ownership matauranga (education/knowledge).

“The Green Magic Homes have potential to create sustainable employment through establishing a factory that creates the modules in New Zealand. We hope this will happen in Tairawhiti.

“The builds are very time-effective so once the modules arrive, we are hoping to set a record of having homes move-in ready within the next year,” said Ms Crawford.

Ministers Tom and Jose Crawford said the new Oasis Community Church had also been launched.

“We’re still about heart but doing that in a different way,’’ said Tom Crawford. “We are rising again as Oasis Community Church and one of our projects is the Ahuru Mowai Housing Project.”

Ahuru Mowai Housing Project has officially launched plans for building module eco housing to home families most in need in the district.

The project is being driven by Oasis Community Church, formerly Mega Life Church, with the double aim of increasing ownership of energy-efficient homes and boosting employment.

Ahuru Mowai plans to build seven module homes in Ida Road (Kaiti) and two others in Wainui.

A Wainui Road house owned by the church will be sold to co-fund the project, says project director Lizz Crawford.

Ahuru Mowai is motivated by the housing crisis and poverty levels in the country.

“It is also a time to show our humanity,” says Ms Crawford. “Poverty Bay has the highest rate of whanau or families in need of healthy, affordable housing to rent or own.

‘‘Our vision is for everyone to have a place to call home in Aotearoa.”

The project will feature Green Magic Homes from Mexico and there is also research being done into Earthcube houses from Vietnam.

Green Magic Homes structures are covered by soil and rich greenery, making them energy-efficient and energy-saving while keeping a temperature-balanced interior. Earthcube houses are made of single-use containers.

Ahuru Mowai has done its research, says Ms Crawford.

“The foreign homes are cheaper, especially if whanau are trained to do some aspects themselves.”

A New Zealand Green Magic house had been built in Horokiwi, Lower Hutt and in the next few months, people would be undergoing training on how to build these.

“We will then buy into our own Green Magic home and start selling modules of which we get an income stream.

“The Green Magic home we buy will become the first training base for a Gisborne team who can put the modules together.”

Having been told the Provincial Growth Fund was not available as the Government already funded housing through KiwiBuild, Ahuru Mowai will seek funding from community providers.

Ahuru Mowai is identifying those most in need, many of them on the East Coast.

Ms Crawford said from five workshops they had held, 90 percent of attendees indicated their desire to be home owners.

There were a lot of people attempting to find their own solutions— from the establishment of papakainga (a collective way of Maori housing development) to different types of building including earth-rammed, straw bale, container homes and new technology.

‘‘We’re going to have something to help everyone — from financial literacy to those who have already been successful in helping homeless in their communities.

“We’re talking about housing solutions. We are not a social housing provider.

“It’s about working out solutions so you can find a home to own for you and your family — community housing.

'Hoping to have homes ready within the next year'

“The project, in its entirety, requires not only tradies but working together with social services and other providers to provide employment, income, financial and home ownership matauranga (education/knowledge).

“The Green Magic Homes have potential to create sustainable employment through establishing a factory that creates the modules in New Zealand. We hope this will happen in Tairawhiti.

“The builds are very time-effective so once the modules arrive, we are hoping to set a record of having homes move-in ready within the next year,” said Ms Crawford.

Ministers Tom and Jose Crawford said the new Oasis Community Church had also been launched.

“We’re still about heart but doing that in a different way,’’ said Tom Crawford. “We are rising again as Oasis Community Church and one of our projects is the Ahuru Mowai Housing Project.”

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