Pilgrim with a cause

the way of saint james: Hamilton-based midwife and former Gisborne woman Christina Campbell is in the middle of a 960-kilometre walk in Spain to fundraise for midwifery work in Ethiopia. Picture supplied
Christina Campbell. Picture supplied
Christina Campbell at Santiago de Compostela. Picture supplied
Christina Campbell's route to St James. Picture supplied

Former Gisborne woman Christina Campbell, who was brought up on Awapapa Station at Hangaroa, is in the middle of a 960-kilometre walk in northern Spain as part of a fundraising effort for midwifery in Ethiopia.

The Camino de Santiago (Way of St James) is an ancient pilgrimage route which has been followed since 812AD, with many starting points throughout Europe. The traditional route begins in the foothills of the French Pyrenees and traverse northern Spain to Finisterre (which is Spanish for “the end of the world”).

It includes the route used in 1808 by Napoleon to get his army in and out of Spain and France.

Ms Campbell works as an independent midwife in Hamilton and has delivered more than 1000 babies.

Described by brother Alex as having a “rather adventurous spirit”, she has been walking about 22km a day and is just under two weeks into her six-week trek.

She hopes to raise $20,000 for training midwives in Ethiopia.

“My focus with the fundraiser is to reach remote rural women and those deprived of care in pregnancy and childbirth,” Ms Campbell said.

“I am rather passionate about the role midwives play in promoting stronger and healthier communities.

“I am raising money for the Hamlin Fistula Trust NZ, a funding partner of Hamlin Fistula Ethiopia.

“That organisation runs the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital, five outreach hospitals, a midwifery school and 60 midwifery clinics in Ethiopia,” she said.

“If I raise $20,000 it will equip a remote midwifery centre in Ethiopia for one entire year.”

She describes the childbirth situation in that country as quite terrible, with some of the women, particularly young girls, having no specialist care at childbirth.

Ms Campbell was very much a Gisborne girl, growing up on Awapapa Station, attending Hangaroa School and Gisborne Girls’ High, where she was deputy head prefect.

A Givealittle page has been set up to help with Ms Campbell’s fundraising efforts — www.givealittle.co.nz/cause/support-midwives-women-and-babies-in-ethiopia — and the “Christina’s Camino For Hamlin Trust New Zealand” Facebook page has been set up to share the journey with and encourage supporters.

Former Gisborne woman Christina Campbell, who was brought up on Awapapa Station at Hangaroa, is in the middle of a 960-kilometre walk in northern Spain as part of a fundraising effort for midwifery in Ethiopia.

The Camino de Santiago (Way of St James) is an ancient pilgrimage route which has been followed since 812AD, with many starting points throughout Europe. The traditional route begins in the foothills of the French Pyrenees and traverse northern Spain to Finisterre (which is Spanish for “the end of the world”).

It includes the route used in 1808 by Napoleon to get his army in and out of Spain and France.

Ms Campbell works as an independent midwife in Hamilton and has delivered more than 1000 babies.

Described by brother Alex as having a “rather adventurous spirit”, she has been walking about 22km a day and is just under two weeks into her six-week trek.

She hopes to raise $20,000 for training midwives in Ethiopia.

“My focus with the fundraiser is to reach remote rural women and those deprived of care in pregnancy and childbirth,” Ms Campbell said.

“I am rather passionate about the role midwives play in promoting stronger and healthier communities.

“I am raising money for the Hamlin Fistula Trust NZ, a funding partner of Hamlin Fistula Ethiopia.

“That organisation runs the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital, five outreach hospitals, a midwifery school and 60 midwifery clinics in Ethiopia,” she said.

“If I raise $20,000 it will equip a remote midwifery centre in Ethiopia for one entire year.”

She describes the childbirth situation in that country as quite terrible, with some of the women, particularly young girls, having no specialist care at childbirth.

Ms Campbell was very much a Gisborne girl, growing up on Awapapa Station, attending Hangaroa School and Gisborne Girls’ High, where she was deputy head prefect.

A Givealittle page has been set up to help with Ms Campbell’s fundraising efforts — www.givealittle.co.nz/cause/support-midwives-women-and-babies-in-ethiopia — and the “Christina’s Camino For Hamlin Trust New Zealand” Facebook page has been set up to share the journey with and encourage supporters.

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