Gisborne District Court news

A mentally-ill man has been found responsible for intentionally wounding a fellow resident at a hotel in Wairoa.

John Tarawera Denton-Tipoki, 24, was excused from attending court when his case was called during a Crown list in Gisborne District Court.

Counsel Michael Lynch said his client was now in a secure hospital facility in Porirua in anticipation of health inquiries that would need to be undertaken as a result of this hearing.

Mr Lynch did not oppose a contention by the Crown that the court could find Denton-Tipoki responsible for acts that resulted in the charges against him — wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, common assault (laid under the Crimes Act), and theft (of between $500 and $1000).

Those charges arose out of an incident on August 15, last year, when Denton-Tipoki and the complainant were residents at Wairoa’s Country Club.

Judge Warren Cathcart said he was satisfied evidence presented to the court was sufficient to establish Denton-Tipoki caused each of the acts underlying the charges.

The judge will consider specialist health reports and decide how to finalise the case at a hearing on June 7.

Believing his employer owed him money for lost wages, Kelvin Lewis Manuel stole $3500 worth of diesel, the court was told.

Manuel pleaded guilty to theft (over $1000).

He was ordered to do 150 hours community work and to make reparation for the fuel.

Judge Cathcart told Manuel he should have taken his dispute to the Employment or civil court — not engaged in this “criminal and stupid conduct”.

The offending occurred in Warkworth where Manuel was employed by a haulage firm. The case was transferred here when Manuel relocated.

Admitting an 11th offence of driving while disqualified and breaches of community work and bail, Dwayne Rangi Lloyd, 38, was further remanded on bail until September 11 for a report into his suitability for an electronically-monitored sentence.

Judge Cathcart noted Lloyd’s disqualified driving offences dated back to 1999. He also had two similar offences of driving while prohibited.

The adjournment will allow Lloyd time to get proof of an employment offer and to complete the remainder of a previously-imposed community work sentence, the judge said.

He told Lloyd those things could mean the difference between a sentence of home detention or community detention.

For his 10th drink-drive offence, Edward Norman Hape, 57, painter, was sentenced to four months community detention, 14 months intensive supervision, and disqualified from driving for a year and a day.

Hape admitted the offence in which he returned a breath-alcohol reading of 564 micrograms. His most recent previous similar offence was six years ago.

David Morris, 53, admitted a seventh drink-drive offence (600mcg) and driving while unlicensed. He received four months community detention, nine months supervision, and was disqualified from driving for a year and a day.

Judge Cathcart noted there were significant gaps between some of the previous offences.

Tirea Mahana Jones, 27, pleaded guilty to common assault (laid under the Crimes Act) after the charge was reduced from injuring with intent to injure. She was further remanded on bail for sentence on September 11. The case was referred to the restorative justice process. The victim is one of Jones’ relatives.

Brothers Kupa Farquar Simpson, 27, and Ropata Joseph Pekamu Simpson, 25, appeared together in the dock on a jointly-laid charge of injuring with intent to injure, which was reduced to an assault under the Crimes Act.

Kupa Simpson also pleaded guilty to an additional assault charge, also laid under the Crimes Act.

Both were further remanded on bail for sentencing on September 11. Reports canvassing the suitability of an electronically-monitored sentence were ordered for both.

Ropata Simpson will also be sentenced that day for charges to which he previously pleaded guilty, arising out of an unrelated traffic incident — drink-driving (669mcg), driving contrary to his zero-alcohol licence, and aggravated assault (in relation to a police officer he punched in the mouth).

A bail condition preventing the two from associating, was removed.

A man referred to the Family Harm Intervention Court was told not to miss the opportunity for assistance that special court could give him.

Turi Mokomoko, 37, admitted three offences arising out of a family harm incident — wilful damage, assault on a person in a family relationship, and assault of a child.

Counsel Stephen Taylor said Mokomoko was a suitable candidate for the special court — he had self-referred to Tauawhi Men’s Centre and was willing to continue addressing issues underlying the offending.

Charged with wilful trespass, Quintin Tamanui, 22, changed his earlier not guilty plea to guilty. He was convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called upon within nine months.

Counsel Michael Lynch said the incident arose out of ongoing issues between Tamanui and his former partner, who are currently undergoing Family Court proceedings in relation to their child.

Given that, Tamanui wanted this matter dealt with as soon as possible and that was part of the reason for his guilty plea. Judge Cathcart said it was clear Tamanui was not welcome at the woman’s address. He needed to stay away.

Jac Carlson, 28, changed his previous plea of not guilty to guilty of resisting police. He also admitted breaching community work and supervision.

On five other charges — four breaches of a protection order and assault of a person in a family relationship — Carlson maintained his not guilty pleas. Those matters, which arose out of three separate incidents, were scheduled for September 9.

The charges to which he pleaded guilty will follow alongside.

Charged with assaulting a woman and assaulting a child, Dallas Christopher Haenga, 45, pleaded guilty.

Counsel Mark Sceats asked for Haenga to be referred to the Family Harm Intervention Court. Since the offending, Haenga had attended a lengthy rehabilitation programme in Rotorua. He wanted to turn his life around.

Judge Cathcart agreed to give Haenga a chance but noted Haenga’s “shocking” history would normally preclude him from being referred.

Haenga will appear in the Family Harm Intervention Court on June 25.

The child Haenga assaulted was a 12-year-old, who he punched in the mouth.

Rihara Eruera Raharuhi Maxwell, 34, pleaded guilty to six charges arising out of a family harm incident after police withdrew one of two charges of threatening to kill. The remaining charges were: assault of a female, assault with a blunt instrument, assault on a person in a family relationship, threatening to kill, wilful damage and a breach of intensive supervision.

Maxwell was further remanded in custody for sentence by AV-link on June 5.

The case was referred to the restorative justice process.

Dayna Te Kahu, now 20, pleaded guilty to drink-driving as an under 20-year-old, escaping custody, and a breach of bail.

She maintained her not guilty plea to a charge of assault (laid under the Crimes Act) for which she was further remanded on bail for a judge-alone trial on September 16.

A mentally-ill man has been found responsible for intentionally wounding a fellow resident at a hotel in Wairoa.

John Tarawera Denton-Tipoki, 24, was excused from attending court when his case was called during a Crown list in Gisborne District Court.

Counsel Michael Lynch said his client was now in a secure hospital facility in Porirua in anticipation of health inquiries that would need to be undertaken as a result of this hearing.

Mr Lynch did not oppose a contention by the Crown that the court could find Denton-Tipoki responsible for acts that resulted in the charges against him — wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, common assault (laid under the Crimes Act), and theft (of between $500 and $1000).

Those charges arose out of an incident on August 15, last year, when Denton-Tipoki and the complainant were residents at Wairoa’s Country Club.

Judge Warren Cathcart said he was satisfied evidence presented to the court was sufficient to establish Denton-Tipoki caused each of the acts underlying the charges.

The judge will consider specialist health reports and decide how to finalise the case at a hearing on June 7.

Believing his employer owed him money for lost wages, Kelvin Lewis Manuel stole $3500 worth of diesel, the court was told.

Manuel pleaded guilty to theft (over $1000).

He was ordered to do 150 hours community work and to make reparation for the fuel.

Judge Cathcart told Manuel he should have taken his dispute to the Employment or civil court — not engaged in this “criminal and stupid conduct”.

The offending occurred in Warkworth where Manuel was employed by a haulage firm. The case was transferred here when Manuel relocated.

Admitting an 11th offence of driving while disqualified and breaches of community work and bail, Dwayne Rangi Lloyd, 38, was further remanded on bail until September 11 for a report into his suitability for an electronically-monitored sentence.

Judge Cathcart noted Lloyd’s disqualified driving offences dated back to 1999. He also had two similar offences of driving while prohibited.

The adjournment will allow Lloyd time to get proof of an employment offer and to complete the remainder of a previously-imposed community work sentence, the judge said.

He told Lloyd those things could mean the difference between a sentence of home detention or community detention.

For his 10th drink-drive offence, Edward Norman Hape, 57, painter, was sentenced to four months community detention, 14 months intensive supervision, and disqualified from driving for a year and a day.

Hape admitted the offence in which he returned a breath-alcohol reading of 564 micrograms. His most recent previous similar offence was six years ago.

David Morris, 53, admitted a seventh drink-drive offence (600mcg) and driving while unlicensed. He received four months community detention, nine months supervision, and was disqualified from driving for a year and a day.

Judge Cathcart noted there were significant gaps between some of the previous offences.

Tirea Mahana Jones, 27, pleaded guilty to common assault (laid under the Crimes Act) after the charge was reduced from injuring with intent to injure. She was further remanded on bail for sentence on September 11. The case was referred to the restorative justice process. The victim is one of Jones’ relatives.

Brothers Kupa Farquar Simpson, 27, and Ropata Joseph Pekamu Simpson, 25, appeared together in the dock on a jointly-laid charge of injuring with intent to injure, which was reduced to an assault under the Crimes Act.

Kupa Simpson also pleaded guilty to an additional assault charge, also laid under the Crimes Act.

Both were further remanded on bail for sentencing on September 11. Reports canvassing the suitability of an electronically-monitored sentence were ordered for both.

Ropata Simpson will also be sentenced that day for charges to which he previously pleaded guilty, arising out of an unrelated traffic incident — drink-driving (669mcg), driving contrary to his zero-alcohol licence, and aggravated assault (in relation to a police officer he punched in the mouth).

A bail condition preventing the two from associating, was removed.

A man referred to the Family Harm Intervention Court was told not to miss the opportunity for assistance that special court could give him.

Turi Mokomoko, 37, admitted three offences arising out of a family harm incident — wilful damage, assault on a person in a family relationship, and assault of a child.

Counsel Stephen Taylor said Mokomoko was a suitable candidate for the special court — he had self-referred to Tauawhi Men’s Centre and was willing to continue addressing issues underlying the offending.

Charged with wilful trespass, Quintin Tamanui, 22, changed his earlier not guilty plea to guilty. He was convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called upon within nine months.

Counsel Michael Lynch said the incident arose out of ongoing issues between Tamanui and his former partner, who are currently undergoing Family Court proceedings in relation to their child.

Given that, Tamanui wanted this matter dealt with as soon as possible and that was part of the reason for his guilty plea. Judge Cathcart said it was clear Tamanui was not welcome at the woman’s address. He needed to stay away.

Jac Carlson, 28, changed his previous plea of not guilty to guilty of resisting police. He also admitted breaching community work and supervision.

On five other charges — four breaches of a protection order and assault of a person in a family relationship — Carlson maintained his not guilty pleas. Those matters, which arose out of three separate incidents, were scheduled for September 9.

The charges to which he pleaded guilty will follow alongside.

Charged with assaulting a woman and assaulting a child, Dallas Christopher Haenga, 45, pleaded guilty.

Counsel Mark Sceats asked for Haenga to be referred to the Family Harm Intervention Court. Since the offending, Haenga had attended a lengthy rehabilitation programme in Rotorua. He wanted to turn his life around.

Judge Cathcart agreed to give Haenga a chance but noted Haenga’s “shocking” history would normally preclude him from being referred.

Haenga will appear in the Family Harm Intervention Court on June 25.

The child Haenga assaulted was a 12-year-old, who he punched in the mouth.

Rihara Eruera Raharuhi Maxwell, 34, pleaded guilty to six charges arising out of a family harm incident after police withdrew one of two charges of threatening to kill. The remaining charges were: assault of a female, assault with a blunt instrument, assault on a person in a family relationship, threatening to kill, wilful damage and a breach of intensive supervision.

Maxwell was further remanded in custody for sentence by AV-link on June 5.

The case was referred to the restorative justice process.

Dayna Te Kahu, now 20, pleaded guilty to drink-driving as an under 20-year-old, escaping custody, and a breach of bail.

She maintained her not guilty plea to a charge of assault (laid under the Crimes Act) for which she was further remanded on bail for a judge-alone trial on September 16.

Angry, drunk man pointed slug gun through window

An intoxicated, angry man pointed a slug gun at his partner, Gisborne District Court was told.

While Ethan Hata, 21, maintains he had no intention of firing it, his counsel conceded the potential for danger was still high.

Hata pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of presenting a firearm, for which he received 50 hours community work.

The gun will be destroyed.

Judge Cathcart noted Hata told the writer of a pre-sentence report he was too drunk to remember much about the incident.

According to an agreed police summary, Hata arrived drunk at his partner’s house about 11pm one evening. The woman had been socialising there with friends. Hata passed out on the doorstep.

She had gone to check on their 10-month-old baby when Hata entered the house and got an air gun that was hidden under a dresser.

He pointed it at the woman through a window, causing her to fear he was going to shoot her.

Counsel Doug Rishworth said the situation was a classic example of the imminent danger in situations involving alcohol and firearms.

While the weapon was only an air gun, had it gone off — either intentionally or accidentally — the consequences could have been dire, Mr Rishworth said.

In Hata’s favour, he had few prior convictions and there had been no further incidents since this one, Mr Rishworth said.

The judge also spoke about the enormous consequences Hata might have faced if the gun had fired. He noted Hata’s relationship with his partner had broken down after the incident and the pair were now involved in Family Court proceedings.

The judge said he recognised Hata as a man he recently sentenced for an incident involving a drunken diatribe directed at a drive-through takeaway worker.

Mr Rishworth said Hata was now addressing his use of alcohol and was working for his father.