Forests, housing on fix-it list

FINDING ANSWERS: John Shortland and Cameron Nepe hack into some solutions at the Hack Tairawhiti hackathon. Picture by Paul Rickard
Hackathon - Tony Robinson and Lily Stender at Hack-Tairawhiti. Picture by Paul Rickard
Hackathon: (Back row) Alice Kibble, William Maurirere and Samantha Le with Joshua Hitchcock and Hayden Do. Picture by Paul Rickard

Plans to solve Gisborne’s housing crisis and save an endangered forest were just two real-world solutions put forward at an annual hackathon event at the weekend.

Run by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise and Datacom, the Hack-Tairawhiti Hackathon featured seven Gisborne businesses and more than 100 business leaders, technologists, creatives, designers, entrepreneurs and investors from across New Zealand.

Co-organiser NZTE customer manager for Maori international growth Teresa Pollard said the 48-hour challenge resulted in some “amazing” solutions that could help a range of issues across the region.

“The winner for the weekend was LeaderBrand. They had a team that built an entire platform to focus on reducing wastage of broccoli and broccoli crops to manage supply-chain volatility.”

That could save the company about $500,000 a year.

“So LeaderBrand are absolutely stoked with that.”

Big issues tackled with tech

Other winning solutions included a new App to connect all Ngati Porou’s honey producers together, so they could collectively get a more premium price for their honey.

Ms Pollard added a solution from Gisborne-based Toha also created a full platform to help solve the region’s housing shortage.

“They built a social enterprise platform that connects out to people who want to move to Gisborne and also people in Gisborne who need housing.

“So they can provide transparency on where new property developments need to be built and manage the housing shortage.”

The idea received $41,000 of pledged funds over the weekend to get it going.

Another solution from Ngati Porou Holdings created a way to use infrared cameras to monitor deer movement in the endangered Raukumara forest.

“They were elated, because before they came to this hack they had no idea what could be created.

“This is a real solution that can be taken forward and is not expensive, and one that can really make a huge difference to the forest.”

This was the second hackathon and attracted not only developers from around New Zealand but a top Californian web developer too.

There were also a lot of participants from Gisborne, including Reece Morley, who received the event’s lead designer award for the NPM presentation.

“It was amazing — from my perspective, these types of events are the ones that actually create real inspiration for locals here. The locals who came along were just blown away.”

Plans to solve Gisborne’s housing crisis and save an endangered forest were just two real-world solutions put forward at an annual hackathon event at the weekend.

Run by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise and Datacom, the Hack-Tairawhiti Hackathon featured seven Gisborne businesses and more than 100 business leaders, technologists, creatives, designers, entrepreneurs and investors from across New Zealand.

Co-organiser NZTE customer manager for Maori international growth Teresa Pollard said the 48-hour challenge resulted in some “amazing” solutions that could help a range of issues across the region.

“The winner for the weekend was LeaderBrand. They had a team that built an entire platform to focus on reducing wastage of broccoli and broccoli crops to manage supply-chain volatility.”

That could save the company about $500,000 a year.

“So LeaderBrand are absolutely stoked with that.”

Big issues tackled with tech

Other winning solutions included a new App to connect all Ngati Porou’s honey producers together, so they could collectively get a more premium price for their honey.

Ms Pollard added a solution from Gisborne-based Toha also created a full platform to help solve the region’s housing shortage.

“They built a social enterprise platform that connects out to people who want to move to Gisborne and also people in Gisborne who need housing.

“So they can provide transparency on where new property developments need to be built and manage the housing shortage.”

The idea received $41,000 of pledged funds over the weekend to get it going.

Another solution from Ngati Porou Holdings created a way to use infrared cameras to monitor deer movement in the endangered Raukumara forest.

“They were elated, because before they came to this hack they had no idea what could be created.

“This is a real solution that can be taken forward and is not expensive, and one that can really make a huge difference to the forest.”

This was the second hackathon and attracted not only developers from around New Zealand but a top Californian web developer too.

There were also a lot of participants from Gisborne, including Reece Morley, who received the event’s lead designer award for the NPM presentation.

“It was amazing — from my perspective, these types of events are the ones that actually create real inspiration for locals here. The locals who came along were just blown away.”

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