Climate warriors

Climate Change protest. Picture by Liam Clayton

Elbow your elders, and don’t stop speaking up.

That was some of the advice from student protesters who gathered at Waikanae Beach yesterday afternoon.

They were taking part in the second nationwide strike by students for climate change. The first one was on March 15.

The students picked up rubbish between Midway and Waikanae beaches as part of their actions.

Speakers included Gisborne high school students Lucy Coulston and Maia Ingoe.

They demanded urgent action for the Government to acknowledge it was a “climate emergency” and they encouraged Parliament to support passing the Zero Carbon Bill into law by 2040 at the latest.

Ms Ingoe told the around 30 students who gathered to make sure their voices kept being heard, not just today.

“Don’t let today be the only day you speak out. We are climate warriors. When you go home today, don’t let your activism stop there.”

Deputy mayor Rehette Stoltz was the only invited member from central and local government to attend.

She encouraged the students to keep speaking up, saying they were Tairawhiti’s future leaders.

NZEI Te Riu Roa vice-president and intermediate school teacher Liam Rutherford said it was inspiring to see young people leading the way on such a critical issue.

“As a teacher, it’s really exciting seeing the kids I teach realise they have influence over the world they live in and take action,” he said.

“The disappointing thing is young people are only having to take such a strong stand on climate change because the adults of the world have let them down.”

Elbow your elders, and don’t stop speaking up.

That was some of the advice from student protesters who gathered at Waikanae Beach yesterday afternoon.

They were taking part in the second nationwide strike by students for climate change. The first one was on March 15.

The students picked up rubbish between Midway and Waikanae beaches as part of their actions.

Speakers included Gisborne high school students Lucy Coulston and Maia Ingoe.

They demanded urgent action for the Government to acknowledge it was a “climate emergency” and they encouraged Parliament to support passing the Zero Carbon Bill into law by 2040 at the latest.

Ms Ingoe told the around 30 students who gathered to make sure their voices kept being heard, not just today.

“Don’t let today be the only day you speak out. We are climate warriors. When you go home today, don’t let your activism stop there.”

Deputy mayor Rehette Stoltz was the only invited member from central and local government to attend.

She encouraged the students to keep speaking up, saying they were Tairawhiti’s future leaders.

NZEI Te Riu Roa vice-president and intermediate school teacher Liam Rutherford said it was inspiring to see young people leading the way on such a critical issue.

“As a teacher, it’s really exciting seeing the kids I teach realise they have influence over the world they live in and take action,” he said.

“The disappointing thing is young people are only having to take such a strong stand on climate change because the adults of the world have let them down.”

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