Gisborne District Court news

A woman charged with using a phone for fictitious purposes, intentional damage (of a prison blanket), and disorderly behaviour (in Peel Street), was further remanded in custody without plea, when she appeared in Gisborne District Court.

Pirihira Susan Waara, 55, will be called again in court on June 25.

The case was adjourned for a specialist mental health report.

Waara is alleged to have used the phone to make false reports of multiple fictitious assaults and to have requested police and ambulance services for non-emergency situations.

Awaiting sentence for family violence and driving offences, Cheyenne Mary Haddon, 34, who had been remanded in custody, was granted electronically-monitored bail.

Haddon has admitted two assaults on children, assault with intent to injure, wilful damage (of a vehicle), intimidation, resisting police, dangerous driving, drink-driving, and driving while disqualified.

She will be sentenced on July 30.

Bail conditions include that she must submit to random breath-testing.

The case was referred to the restorative justice process.

To a charge of injuring with reckless disregard, Gerald Hamilton Mount Newman, 55, changed his earlier plea of not guilty to guilty.

The offence arose out of an incident in which Newman is said to have swiped a pot of boiling vegetables at the complainant.

Newman previously pleaded guilty to other matters — two counts of assaulting a female and threatening language.

He was further remanded in custody for sentence on all charges on June 21.

A man accused of offences against his former partner and her new boyfriend, sought electronically-monitored bail but was denied it.

Gene Walter Rangihuna, 48, painter, has pleaded not guilty to making objectionable material, assault on a person in a family relationship, theft (over $1000), threatening to kill, offensive language, and assaulting police (Crimes Act).

He was further remanded in custody for a case review hearing on July 24.

Police allege Rangihuna’s offences against his ex-partner and her new boyfriend were due to an obsession he developed with the woman after the demise of their relationship. He is said to have confronted her in her workplace and made concerning Facebook posts.

Struggling when arrested, he allegedly managed to remove a magazine full of live ammunition from a pistol in a police officer’s hip holster.

Vincent Glen Wilson, 41, denied assaulting someone with a blunt instrument, when he appeared in Ruatoria District Court.

He was further remanded on bail for a case review hearing on July 24.

At 28 years old, Rua Fox had clocked up a troubling number of convictions for family violence, Judge Warren Cathcart noted, as he sentenced him for similar offending.

Fox pleaded guilty to two counts of assaulting a female, and a charge of assault with intent to injure, arising out of two incidents last September 20 and 21. The complainants were his partner and a female neighbour, who tried to intervene in the second incident.

Fox received 200 hours community work and 15 months intensive supervision.

Fox and his partner have been together for about seven years and have four children. The couple have been the subject of numerous family harm reports to police and in 2014, Fox accrued three convictions for matters involving the woman.

About mid-day on September 20 last year, the couple began drinking with a group at Hicks Bay. By 8pm, Fox was standing on a nearby road “nutting off” at his partner. When she asked him what was wrong, he punched her in the jaw.

The woman re-joined the group and continued socialising.

But early the following morning, he assaulted her again after finding her sitting talking with their female neighbour. Fox punched his partner in the head and his neighbour, who tried to intervene, in the face.

Fox grabbed the neighbour by her shirt, ripping it as she tried to get out of the room and when she stumbled, he punched her again in the face.

He grabbed his partner by the neck and pinned her in a laundry area. The neighbour threw her arm around Fox’s neck and punched him twice until he released his grip on his partner’s neck.

The judge said Fox was fortunate not to have been charged under new legislation with a separate offence of strangulation.

The neighbour’s intervention quelled Fox’s anger for a while but later that morning he started verbally abusing his partner again so police were called.

The neighbour suffered a sore cheek and sore, blackened, eye socket. Fox’s partner had a sore jaw and the back of her head was sore from him pulling her around.

Counsel Alistair Clarke said a restorative justice conference usefully identified alcohol consumption and lifestyle choices as the underlying reasons for Fox’s offending and contributed to his outbursts of jealousy.

While not to shift blame to the complainant, Fox’s relationship with her was a complicated one, Mr Clarke said.

Judge Cathcart said a report from the restorative justice conference was favourable. It recorded Fox and his partner agreed they each needed to change their attitudes to one another.

However, Fox’s partner was not obliged to attend the conference and had she not done so he would not be getting the benefit of an associated sentence reduction, the judge said. Fox owed the woman a lot for that.

The judge also noted extensive letters in support of Fox from people who vouched he was trying to turn his life around.

The judge said he hoped Fox’s efforts were sincere and not solely motivated by the prospect of imprisonment. If that was the case, the motivation would not last long and Fox would no doubt reoffend.

A woman charged with using a phone for fictitious purposes, intentional damage (of a prison blanket), and disorderly behaviour (in Peel Street), was further remanded in custody without plea, when she appeared in Gisborne District Court.

Pirihira Susan Waara, 55, will be called again in court on June 25.

The case was adjourned for a specialist mental health report.

Waara is alleged to have used the phone to make false reports of multiple fictitious assaults and to have requested police and ambulance services for non-emergency situations.

Awaiting sentence for family violence and driving offences, Cheyenne Mary Haddon, 34, who had been remanded in custody, was granted electronically-monitored bail.

Haddon has admitted two assaults on children, assault with intent to injure, wilful damage (of a vehicle), intimidation, resisting police, dangerous driving, drink-driving, and driving while disqualified.

She will be sentenced on July 30.

Bail conditions include that she must submit to random breath-testing.

The case was referred to the restorative justice process.

To a charge of injuring with reckless disregard, Gerald Hamilton Mount Newman, 55, changed his earlier plea of not guilty to guilty.

The offence arose out of an incident in which Newman is said to have swiped a pot of boiling vegetables at the complainant.

Newman previously pleaded guilty to other matters — two counts of assaulting a female and threatening language.

He was further remanded in custody for sentence on all charges on June 21.

A man accused of offences against his former partner and her new boyfriend, sought electronically-monitored bail but was denied it.

Gene Walter Rangihuna, 48, painter, has pleaded not guilty to making objectionable material, assault on a person in a family relationship, theft (over $1000), threatening to kill, offensive language, and assaulting police (Crimes Act).

He was further remanded in custody for a case review hearing on July 24.

Police allege Rangihuna’s offences against his ex-partner and her new boyfriend were due to an obsession he developed with the woman after the demise of their relationship. He is said to have confronted her in her workplace and made concerning Facebook posts.

Struggling when arrested, he allegedly managed to remove a magazine full of live ammunition from a pistol in a police officer’s hip holster.

Vincent Glen Wilson, 41, denied assaulting someone with a blunt instrument, when he appeared in Ruatoria District Court.

He was further remanded on bail for a case review hearing on July 24.

At 28 years old, Rua Fox had clocked up a troubling number of convictions for family violence, Judge Warren Cathcart noted, as he sentenced him for similar offending.

Fox pleaded guilty to two counts of assaulting a female, and a charge of assault with intent to injure, arising out of two incidents last September 20 and 21. The complainants were his partner and a female neighbour, who tried to intervene in the second incident.

Fox received 200 hours community work and 15 months intensive supervision.

Fox and his partner have been together for about seven years and have four children. The couple have been the subject of numerous family harm reports to police and in 2014, Fox accrued three convictions for matters involving the woman.

About mid-day on September 20 last year, the couple began drinking with a group at Hicks Bay. By 8pm, Fox was standing on a nearby road “nutting off” at his partner. When she asked him what was wrong, he punched her in the jaw.

The woman re-joined the group and continued socialising.

But early the following morning, he assaulted her again after finding her sitting talking with their female neighbour. Fox punched his partner in the head and his neighbour, who tried to intervene, in the face.

Fox grabbed the neighbour by her shirt, ripping it as she tried to get out of the room and when she stumbled, he punched her again in the face.

He grabbed his partner by the neck and pinned her in a laundry area. The neighbour threw her arm around Fox’s neck and punched him twice until he released his grip on his partner’s neck.

The judge said Fox was fortunate not to have been charged under new legislation with a separate offence of strangulation.

The neighbour’s intervention quelled Fox’s anger for a while but later that morning he started verbally abusing his partner again so police were called.

The neighbour suffered a sore cheek and sore, blackened, eye socket. Fox’s partner had a sore jaw and the back of her head was sore from him pulling her around.

Counsel Alistair Clarke said a restorative justice conference usefully identified alcohol consumption and lifestyle choices as the underlying reasons for Fox’s offending and contributed to his outbursts of jealousy.

While not to shift blame to the complainant, Fox’s relationship with her was a complicated one, Mr Clarke said.

Judge Cathcart said a report from the restorative justice conference was favourable. It recorded Fox and his partner agreed they each needed to change their attitudes to one another.

However, Fox’s partner was not obliged to attend the conference and had she not done so he would not be getting the benefit of an associated sentence reduction, the judge said. Fox owed the woman a lot for that.

The judge also noted extensive letters in support of Fox from people who vouched he was trying to turn his life around.

The judge said he hoped Fox’s efforts were sincere and not solely motivated by the prospect of imprisonment. If that was the case, the motivation would not last long and Fox would no doubt reoffend.

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