Pre-op practice here now NZ-wide

Spend five to save lives

Spend five to save lives

Today is Surgical Briefing Awareness Day. Surgical teams around the country will from now on run through a five-minute briefing process before the day’s surgery. Gisborne Hospital staff, however, are ahead of their time. They have been doing this for the past eight years. Pictured at their briefing this morning are (from left) registered nurses Gina Meredith, Keisha Bartlett, Kerry Coburn and Candice Ericson, anaesthetist Richard Morgan, anaesthetic technician Gill Carlin and surgeon Peter Stiven. Picture by Liam Clayton

“Spend five to save lives” is the catchphrase for a pre-surgical procedure put into practice around the country this morning.

Hospital surgical teams were encouraged to hold a five-minute briefing prior to the day’s surgery. The briefings ensure team members know each other and understand each other’s roles. They then discuss and address questions about each surgery that will be performed that day.

Although today is heralded as Surgical Briefing Awareness Day, the process is business-as-usual for Gisborne Hospital where pre-surgery briefings have been the norm for the past eight years.

Surgical briefings at Gisborne Hospital theatres start daily at 8.20am. By 8.30am they are ready for the first person on the day’s surgical list.The initiative began at Gisborne Hospital in 2011 when a sticker-based auditing system was used to make pre-surgical briefings the norm.

“The sticker system was introduced to encourage all members of theatre teams to attend the team briefings and it worked really well,” says theatre manager Sharon Patterson.

“After the implementation phase, it was decided that the first person up for surgery could not be brought into the theatre until the brief had been performed.”

Results show the theatre team is more prepared for the day, says Ms Patterson.

“We make best use of the time available in theatre and any clinical concerns over people having surgery that day are discussed. This is all positive for people we are treating.”

The Health Quality and Safety Commission is now promoting the “spend five to save lives” campaign to encourage the practice in theatres around the country.

A study of perioperative briefing and debriefing conducted in the Netherlands across five surgical teams showed the process improved the team climate of surgical teams and the efficiency of their work, says a British Medical Journal report.

“Members of the five surgical teams strongly agreed with the positive influence of perioperative briefing and debriefing on clear agreements and reminding one another of the agreements of the day. They perceived a higher efficiency of the surgical programme with more operations starting on time and less unexpectedly long operation time.”

“Spend five to save lives” is the catchphrase for a pre-surgical procedure put into practice around the country this morning.

Hospital surgical teams were encouraged to hold a five-minute briefing prior to the day’s surgery. The briefings ensure team members know each other and understand each other’s roles. They then discuss and address questions about each surgery that will be performed that day.

Although today is heralded as Surgical Briefing Awareness Day, the process is business-as-usual for Gisborne Hospital where pre-surgery briefings have been the norm for the past eight years.

Surgical briefings at Gisborne Hospital theatres start daily at 8.20am. By 8.30am they are ready for the first person on the day’s surgical list.The initiative began at Gisborne Hospital in 2011 when a sticker-based auditing system was used to make pre-surgical briefings the norm.

“The sticker system was introduced to encourage all members of theatre teams to attend the team briefings and it worked really well,” says theatre manager Sharon Patterson.

“After the implementation phase, it was decided that the first person up for surgery could not be brought into the theatre until the brief had been performed.”

Results show the theatre team is more prepared for the day, says Ms Patterson.

“We make best use of the time available in theatre and any clinical concerns over people having surgery that day are discussed. This is all positive for people we are treating.”

The Health Quality and Safety Commission is now promoting the “spend five to save lives” campaign to encourage the practice in theatres around the country.

A study of perioperative briefing and debriefing conducted in the Netherlands across five surgical teams showed the process improved the team climate of surgical teams and the efficiency of their work, says a British Medical Journal report.

“Members of the five surgical teams strongly agreed with the positive influence of perioperative briefing and debriefing on clear agreements and reminding one another of the agreements of the day. They perceived a higher efficiency of the surgical programme with more operations starting on time and less unexpectedly long operation time.”

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