Took money out of partner’s account to ‘get her attention’

Money was coming between him and his partner so he took $5000 out of her bank account, a man told Gisborne District Court.

Shane Parekura Kerekere, 34, admitted accessing a computer system for a dishonest purpose, saying he was trying to get the woman’s attention.

He also pleaded guilty to a breach of bail.

Judge Warren Cathcart imposed 70 hours community work and reparation in the sum of $2500.

The court was told Kerekere, aware of his partner’s password for online banking transactions, used it to transfer $5000 out of her account. He returned half of it the same day but withdrew the rest in varying amounts from automatic teller machines. That money was still outstanding.

The couple’s relationship had since ended.

The judge said Kerekere was trying to “get back” at the woman.

However, Kerekere had no prior similar convictions and the offending was out of character for him.

There was no proof for Kerekere’s claim in court he had already begun repaying what was owed. If he was later found to have been trying to mislead the court, he could face further consequences, the judge warned.

Youth and lack of parental guidance played a large role in a young man’s offending and were common themes in Gisborne District Court, Judge Cathcart said.

Kavarn Kara, 22, was sentenced to 13 months imprisonment — time he had already served while in custody.

He pleaded guilty to Crown charges of burglary, possessing an offensive weapon, attempting to unlawfully get into a vehicle, and threatening language and to other charges of common assault, threatening language, theft (of goods valued under $500), and breaching community work and supervision.

Judge Warren Cathcart accepted counsel Tiana Epati’s submissions that Kara’s youth and upbringing played a part in his offending and warranted discounts.

The judge set a sentence starting point of 24 months then reduced it by five months for Kara’s youth, two months for his personal circumstances, and a full 25 percent discount for his guilty pleas.

A psychologist’s report for the court described Kara as an “unsophisticated young man with compromised problem-solving ability”.

His personal circumstances included signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, that he had been bullied at school, had limited literacy skills, suffered a mental illness, and that neither of his parents had provided a positive influence, albeit his grandmother had.

Kara’s circumstances were sadly a repeat theme in this court, Judge Cathcart said.

Special release conditions were imposed.

Money was coming between him and his partner so he took $5000 out of her bank account, a man told Gisborne District Court.

Shane Parekura Kerekere, 34, admitted accessing a computer system for a dishonest purpose, saying he was trying to get the woman’s attention.

He also pleaded guilty to a breach of bail.

Judge Warren Cathcart imposed 70 hours community work and reparation in the sum of $2500.

The court was told Kerekere, aware of his partner’s password for online banking transactions, used it to transfer $5000 out of her account. He returned half of it the same day but withdrew the rest in varying amounts from automatic teller machines. That money was still outstanding.

The couple’s relationship had since ended.

The judge said Kerekere was trying to “get back” at the woman.

However, Kerekere had no prior similar convictions and the offending was out of character for him.

There was no proof for Kerekere’s claim in court he had already begun repaying what was owed. If he was later found to have been trying to mislead the court, he could face further consequences, the judge warned.

Youth and lack of parental guidance played a large role in a young man’s offending and were common themes in Gisborne District Court, Judge Cathcart said.

Kavarn Kara, 22, was sentenced to 13 months imprisonment — time he had already served while in custody.

He pleaded guilty to Crown charges of burglary, possessing an offensive weapon, attempting to unlawfully get into a vehicle, and threatening language and to other charges of common assault, threatening language, theft (of goods valued under $500), and breaching community work and supervision.

Judge Warren Cathcart accepted counsel Tiana Epati’s submissions that Kara’s youth and upbringing played a part in his offending and warranted discounts.

The judge set a sentence starting point of 24 months then reduced it by five months for Kara’s youth, two months for his personal circumstances, and a full 25 percent discount for his guilty pleas.

A psychologist’s report for the court described Kara as an “unsophisticated young man with compromised problem-solving ability”.

His personal circumstances included signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, that he had been bullied at school, had limited literacy skills, suffered a mental illness, and that neither of his parents had provided a positive influence, albeit his grandmother had.

Kara’s circumstances were sadly a repeat theme in this court, Judge Cathcart said.

Special release conditions were imposed.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the parking plan change the council is seeking, to reduce parking requirements for new business developments in the inner harbour?