Manutuke venue for arts festival launch

WORLD PREMIERE: Actor/singer Mere Boynton (right) will talk about Nancy Brunning’s play Witi’s Wahine at next week’s announcement of the Tairawhiti Arts Festival programme. The play, which will have its world premiere at the inaugural arts festival, also features Roimata Fox (left), Ani-Piki Tuari, and Ngapaki Moetara. Picture by Strike Photography

A choral performance by Manutuke community members will open the launch next week of the Tairawhiti Arts Festival programme.

An outline of the October 4 to 20 programme will be presented at the invitation-only event at Toko Toru Tapu Church in Manutuke. The announcement will include a teaser of some of the moments and artists who will be part of the inaugural festival.

A karakia will precede the presentation, but in a way the launch is itself a karakia, a chance to welcome others into the festival space that has been developed and built across the past year, says festival director Tama Waipara.

Creative director for the opening night of the festival, Teina Moetara will talk about that event, followed by singer and actor Mere Boynton who will present an overview of actor/director Nancy Brunning’s play Witi’s Wahine. Based on excerpts from Witi Ihimaera’s novels such as Parihaka Woman, Medicine Woman, and Waituhi, the play’s focus is the female characters in the writer’s stories.

A well-known entertainer, who is also one of the festival artists, will be joined by Manutuke kapa haka group, Tu Te Manawa Maurea, in a special guest performance. A showreel of the festival will follow and formalities will close with a karakia.

Te Tairawhiti Arts Festival promises to deliver more than 70 live performance events from more than 400 national and international performers. Although the two-week festival coincides with Te Ha commemorations of first meetings between Maori and Europeans with the arrival of explorer James Cook 250 years ago, the festival is independent of the sestercentennial.

In a partnership valued at $1 million, Eastland Community Trust is the inaugural Te Tairawhiti Arts Festival’s major supporter.

The festival is expected to be a legacy event that continues to contribute to the region culturally, socially and economically for years to come, says festival director Tama Waipara.

A choral performance by Manutuke community members will open the launch next week of the Tairawhiti Arts Festival programme.

An outline of the October 4 to 20 programme will be presented at the invitation-only event at Toko Toru Tapu Church in Manutuke. The announcement will include a teaser of some of the moments and artists who will be part of the inaugural festival.

A karakia will precede the presentation, but in a way the launch is itself a karakia, a chance to welcome others into the festival space that has been developed and built across the past year, says festival director Tama Waipara.

Creative director for the opening night of the festival, Teina Moetara will talk about that event, followed by singer and actor Mere Boynton who will present an overview of actor/director Nancy Brunning’s play Witi’s Wahine. Based on excerpts from Witi Ihimaera’s novels such as Parihaka Woman, Medicine Woman, and Waituhi, the play’s focus is the female characters in the writer’s stories.

A well-known entertainer, who is also one of the festival artists, will be joined by Manutuke kapa haka group, Tu Te Manawa Maurea, in a special guest performance. A showreel of the festival will follow and formalities will close with a karakia.

Te Tairawhiti Arts Festival promises to deliver more than 70 live performance events from more than 400 national and international performers. Although the two-week festival coincides with Te Ha commemorations of first meetings between Maori and Europeans with the arrival of explorer James Cook 250 years ago, the festival is independent of the sestercentennial.

In a partnership valued at $1 million, Eastland Community Trust is the inaugural Te Tairawhiti Arts Festival’s major supporter.

The festival is expected to be a legacy event that continues to contribute to the region culturally, socially and economically for years to come, says festival director Tama Waipara.

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Melissa - 9 days ago
The festival is intrinsically connected to the sestercentennial. See the comments made 1 day ago versus the comments made 5 years ago...

"Although the two-week festival coincides with Te Ha commemorations of first meetings between Maori and Europeans with the arrival of explorer James Cook 250 years ago, the festival is independent of the sestercentennial.
The festival is expected to be a legacy event that continues to contribute to the region culturally, socially and economically for years to come, says festival director Tama Waipara."

A speech from the Te Ha 1769 Sestersentenial Trust Thursday, 12 June 2014:

"In marking the events of 1769, we will not only be commemorating 250 years of shared history but also establishing legacies that will enhance the economic, cultural and social wellbeing of this region and all of New Zealand. It's an opportunity to commemorate the past and think about our shared future."

https://gg.govt.nz/publications/te-ha-1769-sestercentennial-trust

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