‘Listening to Understand’ topic for HPT Tairawhiti agm guest speaker

The people, principles and plans underpinning the commemorations of the 250th anniversary of Maori and European meeting in Turanganui a Kiwa will be outlined at next week’s Historic Places Tairawhiti’s annual general meeting.

In her first public lecture on Tuia 250 ki Turanga, entitled Listening to Understand, guest speaker Te Ha Trust general manager Glenis Philip-Barbara will provide an insight into the commemorations and explain her personal connection to the trust’s dual heritage/shared future vision.

A former Ministry of Social Development deputy chief executive, Maori Language Commission chief executive and Tairawhiti Polytechnic business development director, Glenis says she is no stranger to Tairawhiti, being a 47th generation descendant of Maui.

As a fourth-generation, Pakeha New Zealander, she also comes from people who have been here for a relatively short time.

Her ancestors made their way down from Angus and Forfar in Scotland, through Liverpool in England to Waimate, Dannevirke and finally Gisborne in 1981.

“This personal connection enables an important level of insight as we take stock of our dual heritage and contemplate an equitable shared future for the two peoples who signed the Treaty of Waitangi in good faith, establishing the nation-state we call New Zealand,” she says.

Historic Places Tairawhiti’s annual meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 17, at Waikanae Surf Life Saving Club, at 6pm.

The people, principles and plans underpinning the commemorations of the 250th anniversary of Maori and European meeting in Turanganui a Kiwa will be outlined at next week’s Historic Places Tairawhiti’s annual general meeting.

In her first public lecture on Tuia 250 ki Turanga, entitled Listening to Understand, guest speaker Te Ha Trust general manager Glenis Philip-Barbara will provide an insight into the commemorations and explain her personal connection to the trust’s dual heritage/shared future vision.

A former Ministry of Social Development deputy chief executive, Maori Language Commission chief executive and Tairawhiti Polytechnic business development director, Glenis says she is no stranger to Tairawhiti, being a 47th generation descendant of Maui.

As a fourth-generation, Pakeha New Zealander, she also comes from people who have been here for a relatively short time.

Her ancestors made their way down from Angus and Forfar in Scotland, through Liverpool in England to Waimate, Dannevirke and finally Gisborne in 1981.

“This personal connection enables an important level of insight as we take stock of our dual heritage and contemplate an equitable shared future for the two peoples who signed the Treaty of Waitangi in good faith, establishing the nation-state we call New Zealand,” she says.

Historic Places Tairawhiti’s annual meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 17, at Waikanae Surf Life Saving Club, at 6pm.

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