‘Right tree in right place’

LAND USE SUPPORT: Regional Development Minister Shane Jones (centre) announced $450,000 government grant funding for Mangatu Blocks Incorporation yesterday afternoon. Picture by Paul Rickard

The Mangatu Blocks Incorporation will receive $450,000 from the Government’s One Billion Trees Fund to help meet costs involved in moving to a more productive and sustainable land-use model.

Regional Development Minister Shane Jones made the announcement at a hui held in the incorporation’s board room yesterday afternoon.

“Mangatu Blocks has identified areas where they can integrate trees into their existing farming operations, which is a key goal of the One Billion Trees Fund,” the minister said.

The incorporation manages 48,100 hectares of land and over half the land is in pastoral farming.

“I am pleased to be able to partner with Mangatu to realise the potential of their land through funding that will establish more than 240 hectares of exotic and native trees.”

In total Mangatu has committed to planting or supporting reversion of more than 3000ha of marginal land for environmental and economic benefits, he said.

Chairman of the incorporation’s committee of management Alan Haronga Junior said their approach was driven by the best use of their land.

“The right tree in the right place as part of our land use mosaic, Mr Haronga Jnr said.

“We take the 1000 year view in terms of what our ancestral lands should look like.”

Mr Jones said the partnership would also see Mangatu Blocks trial their own Manuka seedlings from local sources.

“Working with Maori to protect and enhance their whenua is an important part of the One Billion Trees programme.

“I am encouraging Maori to come forward to partner with the Government through this initiative.”

The $450,000 grant has been divided into two portions.

The Mangatawa Te Hua Te Apiti portion involves 115ha of radiata pine and 2.29ha of regeneration, with $202,010 in committed funding.

The Waihirere Station portion involves supporting 119.26ha of radiata pine, 11ha of eucalyptus and 3.4ha of manuka, totalling $247,643 in committed funding.

Mr Jones described the Billion Trees initiative as designed to “increase the size of the nation’s lungs”.

He applauded the blend of forestry and farming proposed by the Mangatu Blocks Incorporation.

“This is a great showcase, particularly for other Maori incorporations and landowners in general.”

The Mangatu Blocks Incorporation will receive $450,000 from the Government’s One Billion Trees Fund to help meet costs involved in moving to a more productive and sustainable land-use model.

Regional Development Minister Shane Jones made the announcement at a hui held in the incorporation’s board room yesterday afternoon.

“Mangatu Blocks has identified areas where they can integrate trees into their existing farming operations, which is a key goal of the One Billion Trees Fund,” the minister said.

The incorporation manages 48,100 hectares of land and over half the land is in pastoral farming.

“I am pleased to be able to partner with Mangatu to realise the potential of their land through funding that will establish more than 240 hectares of exotic and native trees.”

In total Mangatu has committed to planting or supporting reversion of more than 3000ha of marginal land for environmental and economic benefits, he said.

Chairman of the incorporation’s committee of management Alan Haronga Junior said their approach was driven by the best use of their land.

“The right tree in the right place as part of our land use mosaic, Mr Haronga Jnr said.

“We take the 1000 year view in terms of what our ancestral lands should look like.”

Mr Jones said the partnership would also see Mangatu Blocks trial their own Manuka seedlings from local sources.

“Working with Maori to protect and enhance their whenua is an important part of the One Billion Trees programme.

“I am encouraging Maori to come forward to partner with the Government through this initiative.”

The $450,000 grant has been divided into two portions.

The Mangatawa Te Hua Te Apiti portion involves 115ha of radiata pine and 2.29ha of regeneration, with $202,010 in committed funding.

The Waihirere Station portion involves supporting 119.26ha of radiata pine, 11ha of eucalyptus and 3.4ha of manuka, totalling $247,643 in committed funding.

Mr Jones described the Billion Trees initiative as designed to “increase the size of the nation’s lungs”.

He applauded the blend of forestry and farming proposed by the Mangatu Blocks Incorporation.

“This is a great showcase, particularly for other Maori incorporations and landowners in general.”

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Thelma Karaitiana - 9 days ago
Every Hapu has a long-held responsibility to be Kaitieki of their environment and will express this in their own unique way. When engagement through the Resource Management Act (RMA) is required, the guidelines of what we can and cannot do are quite clear and the government and local government are its watchdogs. Recently we had a case of the RMA being enacted by two hapu of Te Tairawhiti, who as Kaitieki of their environment have opposed port development. The same hapu have then been publicly chastised and bullied by a Government Minister for exercising their rights and in the next breath, the same Minister talks about relationships. In a flashy cock-of-the-walk manner, the Minister has trampled the mana of local hapu and I daresay the next time Shane Jones is at a marae along the East Coast he will leave minus quite a few feathers. As to the Eastland Port and Hapu relationships, thanks to the Minister these have been set back another ten years.

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