Study shows Gisborne quality of life average

Gisborne has room to improve in the quality of life and quality of business on offer to residents and prospective newbies, a new study shows.

The Motu Economic and Public Policy Research institute used a “deep-dive” analysis of census rent and wage data to look at whether people chose to move to locations for better quality of life or better quality of business.

Motu senior fellow Professor Arthur Grimes said that at the time of the 2013 census, Gisborne was ranked around the middle of urban areas in New Zealand for quality of life and quality of business.

“Our research has shown that ‘natural’ factors such as climate have a positive impact on quality of life of places, and Gisborne’s great climate will have contributed positively to its perceived quality of life.

“This means that there is room to improve the attractiveness of other factors also rated highly by people (for example, cultural amenities).

“Quality of business is strongly related to city size and it is difficult for any place to change its size quickly.

“Instead, Gisborne could look to other factors which businesses rate when they consider their location and job decisions, such as planning processes and transport links, including air travel links.”

The study showed locations with a high quality of life attracted migrants from other urban areas, but did not attract international migrants.

Meanwhile, locations with a high quality of business tended to attract international migrants.

An improvement in a location’s quality of business is estimated to increase international migration into that location while raising domestic residents’ migration out of that location although by a lesser degree.

“The attractiveness of quality of business holds even when we control for the way that international migrants move to big ‘gateway’ cities on first arrival.”

On the other hand, people aged between 30 and 59, who have lived in New Zealand for five years, tend to leave big cities where there is a high quality of life and/or business, and go to smaller places with an even higher quality of life.

“From a local government perspective, when city officials are deciding between a port that helps business or a concert hall, they are implicitly choosing the type of migrant that they attract, as well as the type of city that may result,” Dr Grimes said.

The study, under the title Building Better Homes, Towns and Cities, is one of 11 National Science Challenges funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Enterprise.

Building Better Homes, Towns and Cities develops findings that will empower the public, planners and policy-makers with reliable information and new tools for fresh thinking and better decisions.

Gisborne has room to improve in the quality of life and quality of business on offer to residents and prospective newbies, a new study shows.

The Motu Economic and Public Policy Research institute used a “deep-dive” analysis of census rent and wage data to look at whether people chose to move to locations for better quality of life or better quality of business.

Motu senior fellow Professor Arthur Grimes said that at the time of the 2013 census, Gisborne was ranked around the middle of urban areas in New Zealand for quality of life and quality of business.

“Our research has shown that ‘natural’ factors such as climate have a positive impact on quality of life of places, and Gisborne’s great climate will have contributed positively to its perceived quality of life.

“This means that there is room to improve the attractiveness of other factors also rated highly by people (for example, cultural amenities).

“Quality of business is strongly related to city size and it is difficult for any place to change its size quickly.

“Instead, Gisborne could look to other factors which businesses rate when they consider their location and job decisions, such as planning processes and transport links, including air travel links.”

The study showed locations with a high quality of life attracted migrants from other urban areas, but did not attract international migrants.

Meanwhile, locations with a high quality of business tended to attract international migrants.

An improvement in a location’s quality of business is estimated to increase international migration into that location while raising domestic residents’ migration out of that location although by a lesser degree.

“The attractiveness of quality of business holds even when we control for the way that international migrants move to big ‘gateway’ cities on first arrival.”

On the other hand, people aged between 30 and 59, who have lived in New Zealand for five years, tend to leave big cities where there is a high quality of life and/or business, and go to smaller places with an even higher quality of life.

“From a local government perspective, when city officials are deciding between a port that helps business or a concert hall, they are implicitly choosing the type of migrant that they attract, as well as the type of city that may result,” Dr Grimes said.

The study, under the title Building Better Homes, Towns and Cities, is one of 11 National Science Challenges funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Enterprise.

Building Better Homes, Towns and Cities develops findings that will empower the public, planners and policy-makers with reliable information and new tools for fresh thinking and better decisions.

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