Spatial Plan update

RED MARKS THE SPOT: The areas marked in red in Awapuni and wider the CBD area have been identified in Gisborne District Council's spatial plan as areas for possible residential development. Image provided

RESIDENTIAL redevelopment of the Awapuni area and town squares are possibilities discussed yesterday by Gisborne district councillors as they received a noting report updating progress on the Tairawhiti Spatial Plan 2050.

The council’s community development and services committee received the report, which said the consultation period had been extended, with the spatial plan to be presented to the full council in December for adoption.

Committee chairman Andy Cranston referred to a part of the report stating “existing commercially zoned land along Childers Road and the Awapuni block to the north and west of the core retail area of the city centre” was the “obvious area for larger-scale residential development”.

The area would need rezoning, he said.

Strategic planning manager Jo Noble said the area needed further exploration and research. The report did not mean it would go ahead. Would it make sense to rezone or “are we happy as it is”?

Shannon Dowsing described the area as a light commercial area within a residential area. There were a lot of yards and storage areas, not always in active use. Redevelopment made sense but the land was privately owned.

The report says the land was “flat and characterised by large, underutilised, low amenity commercial/ industrial sites under single ownership.

“They are also located in the nexus of important physical and social infrastructure, as well as key natural amenities such as Waikanae and Midway Beaches and Alfred Cox reserve.

“A total area of 35.6 hectares has been identified for potential residential development in the short to medium term.”

The Awapuni area has previously been mooted as a possible route for logging trucks.

Mr Cranston said some ideas in the spatial plan “have been chased around for as long as I have been here’’.

That was especially so with ideas such as Grey Street redevelopment and getting city squares. He was concerned about what could be done.

The spatial plan identified comprehensive and simplified rezoning in the city centre as a first step.

“How do we go about making that first step?” said Mr Cranston

The spatial plan said the city centre lacked paved open spaces, with the CBD area widely dispersed outside the “core’’ Grey Street to Wainui Road area.

Heipipi Endeavour Park was the ‘‘most logical place for the development of Gisborne’s primary town square”.

Other possible locations included Treble Court, the Lowe Street.Wi Pere monument area, the junction of Grey Street and Gladstone Road and the junction of Peel Street and Gladstone Road.

Larry Foster said the report was fantastic. It covered public spaces and CBD issues, which the Heart of Gisborne had long discussed. He had questions about the region’s projected population as stated in the report.

Most population growth was expected in the 70-plus age group.

He questioned that. The more improvements were made in the city, the more younger people would be encouraged to return, he said.

“Young ones are coming back already with the transformational things we are doing.”

The projected population for the region was expected to reach 49,390 in 2028.

‘‘We have 49,100 already.”

There had been issues with the Census, “but you just look around and you know the population is increasing’’. The ‘‘great plans’’ had to go out to developers, said Mr Foster. There was a vision “but how do we implement them? How do we encourage business to relocate?”

Pat Seymour expressed dissatisfaction with the level of spatial plan consultation with townships, particularly those on the Coast. Townships had not yet been spoken to despite such meetings being ‘‘expressly asked for”.

Bill Burdett said he was pleased with the forestry, business and farming representatives who had attended spatial planning meetings.

Mr Cranston said he had been to several well-attended meetings.

Mrs Seymour said those meetings were the same meetings referred to by Mr Burdett — planning meetings to which special interest groups had been invited.

Ms Noble said community engagement would be as broad as possible involving hapu, youth and townships.

Councillors were invited to a workshop on August 14 to discuss “the nitty-gritty”.

RESIDENTIAL redevelopment of the Awapuni area and town squares are possibilities discussed yesterday by Gisborne district councillors as they received a noting report updating progress on the Tairawhiti Spatial Plan 2050.

The council’s community development and services committee received the report, which said the consultation period had been extended, with the spatial plan to be presented to the full council in December for adoption.

Committee chairman Andy Cranston referred to a part of the report stating “existing commercially zoned land along Childers Road and the Awapuni block to the north and west of the core retail area of the city centre” was the “obvious area for larger-scale residential development”.

The area would need rezoning, he said.

Strategic planning manager Jo Noble said the area needed further exploration and research. The report did not mean it would go ahead. Would it make sense to rezone or “are we happy as it is”?

Shannon Dowsing described the area as a light commercial area within a residential area. There were a lot of yards and storage areas, not always in active use. Redevelopment made sense but the land was privately owned.

The report says the land was “flat and characterised by large, underutilised, low amenity commercial/ industrial sites under single ownership.

“They are also located in the nexus of important physical and social infrastructure, as well as key natural amenities such as Waikanae and Midway Beaches and Alfred Cox reserve.

“A total area of 35.6 hectares has been identified for potential residential development in the short to medium term.”

The Awapuni area has previously been mooted as a possible route for logging trucks.

Mr Cranston said some ideas in the spatial plan “have been chased around for as long as I have been here’’.

That was especially so with ideas such as Grey Street redevelopment and getting city squares. He was concerned about what could be done.

The spatial plan identified comprehensive and simplified rezoning in the city centre as a first step.

“How do we go about making that first step?” said Mr Cranston

The spatial plan said the city centre lacked paved open spaces, with the CBD area widely dispersed outside the “core’’ Grey Street to Wainui Road area.

Heipipi Endeavour Park was the ‘‘most logical place for the development of Gisborne’s primary town square”.

Other possible locations included Treble Court, the Lowe Street.Wi Pere monument area, the junction of Grey Street and Gladstone Road and the junction of Peel Street and Gladstone Road.

Larry Foster said the report was fantastic. It covered public spaces and CBD issues, which the Heart of Gisborne had long discussed. He had questions about the region’s projected population as stated in the report.

Most population growth was expected in the 70-plus age group.

He questioned that. The more improvements were made in the city, the more younger people would be encouraged to return, he said.

“Young ones are coming back already with the transformational things we are doing.”

The projected population for the region was expected to reach 49,390 in 2028.

‘‘We have 49,100 already.”

There had been issues with the Census, “but you just look around and you know the population is increasing’’. The ‘‘great plans’’ had to go out to developers, said Mr Foster. There was a vision “but how do we implement them? How do we encourage business to relocate?”

Pat Seymour expressed dissatisfaction with the level of spatial plan consultation with townships, particularly those on the Coast. Townships had not yet been spoken to despite such meetings being ‘‘expressly asked for”.

Bill Burdett said he was pleased with the forestry, business and farming representatives who had attended spatial planning meetings.

Mr Cranston said he had been to several well-attended meetings.

Mrs Seymour said those meetings were the same meetings referred to by Mr Burdett — planning meetings to which special interest groups had been invited.

Ms Noble said community engagement would be as broad as possible involving hapu, youth and townships.

Councillors were invited to a workshop on August 14 to discuss “the nitty-gritty”.

  • Land along Childers Road, Awapuni block ‘obvious’ areas for larger-scale residential development
  • Heipipi Endeavour Park ‘most logical’ place for Gisborne’s primary town square
Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Jack Marshall, Auckland - 10 days ago
This is fantastic, kia ora to the council for not copying Auckland building outwards into the sprawl. Having a thriving downtown, which is pedestrian and cycle-friendly, is key to being a lively city in the 21st century. It's especially great for kids and the older generations to go in the city and build that community feel.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Should the Gisborne District Council consider easing restrictions around freedom camping?​