Start your day the te reo way . . . with a kapu kawhe

TE REO KAWHE: Rena Kohere orders her coffee in te reo from barista Chante Claassen and Celeste Keesing at Far East Coffee on Awapuni Road. Picture by Liam Clayton

Word is spreading fast as people get a discount for their morning fix at Far East Coffee if they order it in te reo.

To promote Maori Language Week, Far East is encouraging people to korero (talk) in Maori when ordering their kawhe kute (espresso).

Those who do receive 50 cents off a cup for their efforts.

Rena Kohere, a regular customer at Far East, ordered in te reo.

“He pango roa koa (Can I have a long black)?”

“Anei, taku kapu mahi rua (Here is my reusable cup).”

Rena grew up speaking Maori and having moved back from Wellington two years ago says she hears it spoken a lot more in Tairawhiti.

“I like that I can speak Maori with my kids and now I’m not the only person they hear speaking it.”

Maori Language Week has been celebrated each year from 1975. It encourages non-Maori speakers to give it a go, whether it be simple greetings or ordering food and drinks.

The theme this year is Kia Kaha te reo Maori — Let’s make the Maori language strong.

Te reo Maori is a taonga (treasure) of Maori, guaranteed under the Treaty of Waitangi.

But the Maori Language Act 2016 also makes clear it is for every New Zealander and a valued part of our national identity.

Word is spreading fast as people get a discount for their morning fix at Far East Coffee if they order it in te reo.

To promote Maori Language Week, Far East is encouraging people to korero (talk) in Maori when ordering their kawhe kute (espresso).

Those who do receive 50 cents off a cup for their efforts.

Rena Kohere, a regular customer at Far East, ordered in te reo.

“He pango roa koa (Can I have a long black)?”

“Anei, taku kapu mahi rua (Here is my reusable cup).”

Rena grew up speaking Maori and having moved back from Wellington two years ago says she hears it spoken a lot more in Tairawhiti.

“I like that I can speak Maori with my kids and now I’m not the only person they hear speaking it.”

Maori Language Week has been celebrated each year from 1975. It encourages non-Maori speakers to give it a go, whether it be simple greetings or ordering food and drinks.

The theme this year is Kia Kaha te reo Maori — Let’s make the Maori language strong.

Te reo Maori is a taonga (treasure) of Maori, guaranteed under the Treaty of Waitangi.

But the Maori Language Act 2016 also makes clear it is for every New Zealander and a valued part of our national identity.

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