A big yes to compulsory immunisation for measles

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A large majority of Gisborne Herald web poll voters agree it should be compulsory for parents to immunise children against measles.

Following increasing numbers of confirmed measles cases in the North Island, and one suspected case in Gisborne that led to one person being quarantined, this week’s poll asked “Should it be compulsory for parents to immunise their children against measles.

Eight-two percent said “yes”.

“There are enough other diseases and problems in this world without the spread of measles,” one respondent said.

“Vaccinations will lessen the likelihood of the spread.”

Some respondents said those that did not vaccinate children should have to pay for any resulting hospital treatment.

Others pointed out the medical benefits of other immunisations.

“The immunising we all did against polio is an ideal example of how successful immunising can be. The evidence is there to see today as the disease has been wiped from New Zealand,” said one “yes” voter.

Some respondents did not know why parents would not immunise children at all.

“Any parent with a brain in their head and thought for their child would have he or she vaccinated no questions asked,” one said.

Another respondent agreed.

“This is a situation where they need to consider the wider community not just themselves. Their children may not be affected but many others may be as a result of their selfishness.”

Some people felt choice was necessary.

“Unless there are medical grounds or faith-based objections there should be no excuse for being ‘anti-vax’.”

Freedom of choice was even more important for some people.

“I don’t believe in compulsory anything,” one respondent said.

“I’m certain the lemmings will win this one, though. Propaganda is the enemy of the people, unfortunately the people are content in being brainwashed. Freedom? Now there’s a novel idea.”

Older respondents said there was no need to be immunised.

“When I was a lad we all got measles, it was part of growing. No one died, what’s changed? Nanny State?”

A total of 462 people responded to the poll, with 378 (82 percent) saying “yes” and 75 (16 percent) voting “no”. Nine (2 percent) people chose the “don’t know” option.

A large majority of Gisborne Herald web poll voters agree it should be compulsory for parents to immunise children against measles.

Following increasing numbers of confirmed measles cases in the North Island, and one suspected case in Gisborne that led to one person being quarantined, this week’s poll asked “Should it be compulsory for parents to immunise their children against measles.

Eight-two percent said “yes”.

“There are enough other diseases and problems in this world without the spread of measles,” one respondent said.

“Vaccinations will lessen the likelihood of the spread.”

Some respondents said those that did not vaccinate children should have to pay for any resulting hospital treatment.

Others pointed out the medical benefits of other immunisations.

“The immunising we all did against polio is an ideal example of how successful immunising can be. The evidence is there to see today as the disease has been wiped from New Zealand,” said one “yes” voter.

Some respondents did not know why parents would not immunise children at all.

“Any parent with a brain in their head and thought for their child would have he or she vaccinated no questions asked,” one said.

Another respondent agreed.

“This is a situation where they need to consider the wider community not just themselves. Their children may not be affected but many others may be as a result of their selfishness.”

Some people felt choice was necessary.

“Unless there are medical grounds or faith-based objections there should be no excuse for being ‘anti-vax’.”

Freedom of choice was even more important for some people.

“I don’t believe in compulsory anything,” one respondent said.

“I’m certain the lemmings will win this one, though. Propaganda is the enemy of the people, unfortunately the people are content in being brainwashed. Freedom? Now there’s a novel idea.”

Older respondents said there was no need to be immunised.

“When I was a lad we all got measles, it was part of growing. No one died, what’s changed? Nanny State?”

A total of 462 people responded to the poll, with 378 (82 percent) saying “yes” and 75 (16 percent) voting “no”. Nine (2 percent) people chose the “don’t know” option.

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