Tall ships sail into bay

NZ history revisited

NZ history revisited

250 YEARS ON: The Endeavour replica (at right), along with other tall ships including the Spirit of New Zealand (left), entered Turanganui-a-Kiwa/Poverty Bay this morning — exactly 250 years since Lieutenant James Cook sailed the HMS Endeavour into the bay. They were joined by the Te Moananui Waka Flotilla, and thousands of people had lined the city beachfront by 8am to watch as they sailed around the bay. Picture by Paul Rickard
AFTERMATH protest: Protester Sharon Campbell protests the arrival of the Endeavour replica in Gisborne today. Protest Action Turanganui-a-Kiwa are protesting under the banner “250 Years of Colonisation — the Aftermath” the impacts of colonisation, which they say include child uplifts, suicide, climate change, a failing justice system and more. Picture by Liam Clayton

HISTORY came alive on a pristine morning in Turanganui-a-Kiwa/Poverty Bay as the Endeavour replica and other tall ships joined waka hourua and the va’a in a spectacular show that brought together the Tuia 250 navigations story.

The beautiful soft pinks of the dawn set the scene perfectly as the flotilla came together then rounded Tuamotu Island at around 6.15am, before the ships sailed together towards Te Kuri a Paoa/Young Nicks Head as the first rays of the sun glinted off their sails.

“What a stunning sight. It’s so special to see this,” said one onlooker.

“This is such a momentous day for the whole of New Zealand,” said another.

Bonfires were lit on Kaiti Beach at 6am and then at chosen sites around the bay, to show their significance to Maori settlement through ahi kaa — the burning fires of occupation.

A karakia and interdenominational service was held at Te Waiohiharore (The Cut) from 6am, where prayers and salutations were offered for the Maori who died when Lieutenant James Cook and his crew on the Endeavour landed at Turanganui-a-Kiwa.

The flotilla took its time to sail across the face of Te Kuri a Paoa to Muriwai and then around the bay, shadowed by their navy escort, the Protector-class offshore patrol vessel HMNZS Otago.

Thousands of people had lined the city beachfront by 8am to watch.

The free “family breakfast” stalls set up along the Oneroa Walkway did a roaring trade with long lines of people queueing for food and drink. A big playground area was set up for the children in Beacon Reserve and it was well used by the many youngsters.

“We want this day to be about making memories for our children — for them to see the spectacle of bringing together the two navigational components of the commemoration,” the Tuia 250 organisers said in advance.

The tall ships and waka made their approach to Eastland Port just before 11am. It was estimated that docking the ships would take a couple of hours.

The crews from HMB Endeavour, The Spirit of New Zealand, the R. Tucker Thompson, the waka hourua Ngahiraka mai Tawhiti, Haunui and va’a Fa’afaite, as well as the local waka hourua Tairawhiti and the HMNZS Otago, were to disembark for a civic welcome ceremony at the wharf hosted by Mayor Rehette Stoltz from around 1.45pm.

The speakers were to include Governor-General Dame Patsy Reedy and Tuia 250 co-chair Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr.

A private function and lunch was to follow, with speakers there including Crown Relations Minister Kelvin Davis and Dame Jenny Shipley, the other co-chair of the national Tuia 250 event.

A protest action against the arrival of the Endeavour and the ongoing impacts of colonisation and colonialism took place alongside the Turanganui River from around 10am.

Navigating a shared future

“Tuia 250 is a national commemoration and an opportunity for honest conversations about the past, the present and how we navigate our shared future,” said Maori Crown Relations/Te Arawhiti Minister Kelvin Davis.

“The first task of the six vessels in the flotilla will be to honour the tangata whenua of the region, the first people in its history of migration and settlement.

“The Tuia 250 Voyage is the central event in the Tuia 250 programme and it’s an honour to be part of the opening events welcoming the flotilla to our shores on this historic occasion,” he said.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told RNZ’s Morning Report that while there had been commemorations in New Zealand around Cook on a number of occasions, “never before have we acknowledged actually the navigational history of Maori, we haven’t told the story of the loss of life when Cook arrived, the story of Te Maro.

“This is a chance to talk about the reality of New Zealand history . . . to be open about it. That may attract some protest but that is all part of the conversation.”

Ms Ardern said the expression of regret from British High Commissioner Laura Clarke to the iwi of Turanganui-a-Kiwa last week has had an impact.

“I do think that was significant.”

Public open days to see the ships up close

The flotilla vessels will be open to the public during an open day at the inner harbour tomorrow.

Waka, va’a, tall ships and a naval vessel alongside the stardome, interactive workshops, exhibitions and other activities and entertainment will be available as part of the Tuia 250 Flotilla Open Day.

Free transport on both the Wa165 steam train and buses coming from the Elgin and Kaiti areas will be laid on to make it as easy as possible for the wider community to attend.

The inner harbour area will be mostly closed off to cars between 10am and 4pm, so people are being encouraged to park at the Railway Station and catch the free train between 10am-4pm all the way into the festivities.

The free buses are running between 9.30am and 4pm and will drop passengers at The Cenotaph on The Esplanade for a short walk into the inner harbour area.

The HMB Endeavour replica, the gaff-rigged schooner the R Tucker Thompson, the Spirit of New Zealand and the HMNZS Otago as well as the waka and va’a will all open their gangplanks to the community.

While visits to the vessels will be free, a ticketing system will be used as limited numbers will be allowed on each vessel at any one time.

People are advised to get there early and no bags will be allowed on board.

HMNZS Otago will be tied up at Wharf 7 and open to the public between 9.30am and 3.30pm. For safety, visitors should wear closed-toe footwear and be aware there are ladders and steep stairs to navigate.

HISTORY came alive on a pristine morning in Turanganui-a-Kiwa/Poverty Bay as the Endeavour replica and other tall ships joined waka hourua and the va’a in a spectacular show that brought together the Tuia 250 navigations story.

The beautiful soft pinks of the dawn set the scene perfectly as the flotilla came together then rounded Tuamotu Island at around 6.15am, before the ships sailed together towards Te Kuri a Paoa/Young Nicks Head as the first rays of the sun glinted off their sails.

“What a stunning sight. It’s so special to see this,” said one onlooker.

“This is such a momentous day for the whole of New Zealand,” said another.

Bonfires were lit on Kaiti Beach at 6am and then at chosen sites around the bay, to show their significance to Maori settlement through ahi kaa — the burning fires of occupation.

A karakia and interdenominational service was held at Te Waiohiharore (The Cut) from 6am, where prayers and salutations were offered for the Maori who died when Lieutenant James Cook and his crew on the Endeavour landed at Turanganui-a-Kiwa.

The flotilla took its time to sail across the face of Te Kuri a Paoa to Muriwai and then around the bay, shadowed by their navy escort, the Protector-class offshore patrol vessel HMNZS Otago.

Thousands of people had lined the city beachfront by 8am to watch.

The free “family breakfast” stalls set up along the Oneroa Walkway did a roaring trade with long lines of people queueing for food and drink. A big playground area was set up for the children in Beacon Reserve and it was well used by the many youngsters.

“We want this day to be about making memories for our children — for them to see the spectacle of bringing together the two navigational components of the commemoration,” the Tuia 250 organisers said in advance.

The tall ships and waka made their approach to Eastland Port just before 11am. It was estimated that docking the ships would take a couple of hours.

The crews from HMB Endeavour, The Spirit of New Zealand, the R. Tucker Thompson, the waka hourua Ngahiraka mai Tawhiti, Haunui and va’a Fa’afaite, as well as the local waka hourua Tairawhiti and the HMNZS Otago, were to disembark for a civic welcome ceremony at the wharf hosted by Mayor Rehette Stoltz from around 1.45pm.

The speakers were to include Governor-General Dame Patsy Reedy and Tuia 250 co-chair Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr.

A private function and lunch was to follow, with speakers there including Crown Relations Minister Kelvin Davis and Dame Jenny Shipley, the other co-chair of the national Tuia 250 event.

A protest action against the arrival of the Endeavour and the ongoing impacts of colonisation and colonialism took place alongside the Turanganui River from around 10am.

Navigating a shared future

“Tuia 250 is a national commemoration and an opportunity for honest conversations about the past, the present and how we navigate our shared future,” said Maori Crown Relations/Te Arawhiti Minister Kelvin Davis.

“The first task of the six vessels in the flotilla will be to honour the tangata whenua of the region, the first people in its history of migration and settlement.

“The Tuia 250 Voyage is the central event in the Tuia 250 programme and it’s an honour to be part of the opening events welcoming the flotilla to our shores on this historic occasion,” he said.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told RNZ’s Morning Report that while there had been commemorations in New Zealand around Cook on a number of occasions, “never before have we acknowledged actually the navigational history of Maori, we haven’t told the story of the loss of life when Cook arrived, the story of Te Maro.

“This is a chance to talk about the reality of New Zealand history . . . to be open about it. That may attract some protest but that is all part of the conversation.”

Ms Ardern said the expression of regret from British High Commissioner Laura Clarke to the iwi of Turanganui-a-Kiwa last week has had an impact.

“I do think that was significant.”

Public open days to see the ships up close

The flotilla vessels will be open to the public during an open day at the inner harbour tomorrow.

Waka, va’a, tall ships and a naval vessel alongside the stardome, interactive workshops, exhibitions and other activities and entertainment will be available as part of the Tuia 250 Flotilla Open Day.

Free transport on both the Wa165 steam train and buses coming from the Elgin and Kaiti areas will be laid on to make it as easy as possible for the wider community to attend.

The inner harbour area will be mostly closed off to cars between 10am and 4pm, so people are being encouraged to park at the Railway Station and catch the free train between 10am-4pm all the way into the festivities.

The free buses are running between 9.30am and 4pm and will drop passengers at The Cenotaph on The Esplanade for a short walk into the inner harbour area.

The HMB Endeavour replica, the gaff-rigged schooner the R Tucker Thompson, the Spirit of New Zealand and the HMNZS Otago as well as the waka and va’a will all open their gangplanks to the community.

While visits to the vessels will be free, a ticketing system will be used as limited numbers will be allowed on each vessel at any one time.

People are advised to get there early and no bags will be allowed on board.

HMNZS Otago will be tied up at Wharf 7 and open to the public between 9.30am and 3.30pm. For safety, visitors should wear closed-toe footwear and be aware there are ladders and steep stairs to navigate.

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