‘Fantastic launch’, korero on Nationhood under way

ARRIVING IN STYLE: The historic Wa165 steam train chugs across the railway bridge to return for another train-load of passengers to take them to the Tuia 20 Flotilla open day yesterday. About 4000 passengers took the opportunity for a free trip, catching the train to and from the inner harbour. Picture by Liam Clayton
AHOY THERE: Above, Paige McGrory and Molly Coker got to explore the Spirit of New Zealand yesterday. The 42.5-metre steel-hulled, three-masted barquentine was purpose-built by the Spirit of Adventure Trust in 1986 for youth development. This picture and the following pictures in this gallery by Rebecca Grunwell
Cole Harris and Carter Allen check out the cannon on the replica Endeavour at the Tuia 250 open day yesterday.
Ivan Cowhen gets a close look at the replica Endeavour and imagines what it must have been like for those who sailed on her 250 years ago.
Finn Coker finds his sea legs on board the Spirit of New Zealand.

After starting a conversation about nationhood, Tuia 250 ki Turanga has sailed its way into the national history books, showing New Zealand the value of manaakitanga and sharing stories, organisers say.

Te Ha Trust general manager Glenis Philip-Barbara said the event had been enormously satisfying for all.

“Everyone involved worked their hearts out and in the end both visitors to our region and our own community had a chance to be a part of something truly historic.

“We discovered superstars in our midst, who live the kaupapa of ‘Tuia te muka tangata’ (which is a recognition of our shared humanity) and were instrumental in supporting our community to embrace Tuia 250 in a way that feels right for them.”

That was reiterated by Tamsin Evans, deputy chief executive of Tuia Encounters 250 for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.

“We salute the Turanga/Gisborne community for its fantastic launch of the Tuia 250 Voyage. We also want to thank our partners the Te Ha Trust for their brilliant delivery of their phenomenal Tuia 250 ki Turanga programme, which provided so many rich opportunities to engage with the Tuia 250 kaupapa.”

Ms Evans felt it had been the best possible start to the Tuia 250 Voyage.

“There have been so many opportunities for people to engage with the kaupapa here. We have had an incredible celebration of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Pacific voyaging heritage, beginning with the arrival of the three voyaging waka on Saturday. On Tuesday, we welcomed the arrival of the three tall ships, and the civic ceremony by Gisborne District Council and Te Ha was such a fitting and reverent acknowledgement of the first onshore encounters between Maori and Pakeha 250 years ago.”

'Amazing community effort'

Tuia 250 was an opportunity to hold honest conversations about the past, present and how the nation could navigate its shared future, said Ms Evans.

“We have heard so many of these types of conversations, from all aspects of the spectrum, wherever our staff have been in the city and region. We are absolutely thrilled with the turnout of so many people from the Turanga/Gisborne community who have come to get onboard the voyaging waka and tall ships of the Tuia 250 Voyage flotilla.”

Many also took the opportunity to learn about Pacific voyaging traditions at the stardome and the roadshow truck the Tuia Matauranga Experience, which celebrates the expertise and knowledge of Pacific voyagers and navigators, while exploring the relationships between sea, land, and people.

Yesterday’s Tuia 250 Flotilla Open Day drew about 7000 people to the inner harbour area to visit the tall ships — the HMB Endeavour replica, the R. Tucker Thompson and the Spirit of New Zealand, as well as the waka hourua Tairawhiti, Haunui, Ngahiraka Mai Tawhiti and the Tahitian va’a Tipaerua Fa’afaite.

Families also made the most of the opportunity to ride steam train Wa165, with more than 4000 people catching the train either into or out of the inner harbour.

Tuia 250 ki Turanga commemorations manager Edwina Ashwell described the day as an “amazing community effort” with so many involved in ensuring it was a success.

“The commemorations started off on either side of the river. On one side whanau who are bearing a lot of hurt and on the other, whanau trying to manaaki our manuhiri.

“The open days were where we all came together to eat, share stories and learn from one another about the history of our region.

“It is something I didn’t have the opportunity to do when young. Tuia for me has not been about Cook. It is the beginning of something quite magical. I want my son to learn both sides of our history.

“There was so much kindness and grace today.

“We have had plenty of karakia around Tuia 250 and I think we have all felt it.

“A big thanks to the community, the inner harbour community and the fishing fraternity.

“It has been awesome.”

The mass pohiri on Saturday started the commemorations off in spectacular fashion. Thousands were at Te Waiohiharore (The Cut) to welcome the visitors and dignitaries to Turanganui a Kiwa. Many had attended the Pohiri 101 workshops to ensure they understood what was happening and to take part in waiata.

Tuesday saw about 4000 people gather along the Oneroa Walkway to share food, have family fun and enjoy the spectacle of the flotilla coming into and around the bay together.

Ms Philip-Barbara felt Tuia 250 ki Turanga had certainly started something.

“We have started something important for our whole country which will require continued commitment, generosity and goodwill. We are talking about the future of our nation and ensuring we reconnect with the vision of the Treaty.”

After starting a conversation about nationhood, Tuia 250 ki Turanga has sailed its way into the national history books, showing New Zealand the value of manaakitanga and sharing stories, organisers say.

Te Ha Trust general manager Glenis Philip-Barbara said the event had been enormously satisfying for all.

“Everyone involved worked their hearts out and in the end both visitors to our region and our own community had a chance to be a part of something truly historic.

“We discovered superstars in our midst, who live the kaupapa of ‘Tuia te muka tangata’ (which is a recognition of our shared humanity) and were instrumental in supporting our community to embrace Tuia 250 in a way that feels right for them.”

That was reiterated by Tamsin Evans, deputy chief executive of Tuia Encounters 250 for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage.

“We salute the Turanga/Gisborne community for its fantastic launch of the Tuia 250 Voyage. We also want to thank our partners the Te Ha Trust for their brilliant delivery of their phenomenal Tuia 250 ki Turanga programme, which provided so many rich opportunities to engage with the Tuia 250 kaupapa.”

Ms Evans felt it had been the best possible start to the Tuia 250 Voyage.

“There have been so many opportunities for people to engage with the kaupapa here. We have had an incredible celebration of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Pacific voyaging heritage, beginning with the arrival of the three voyaging waka on Saturday. On Tuesday, we welcomed the arrival of the three tall ships, and the civic ceremony by Gisborne District Council and Te Ha was such a fitting and reverent acknowledgement of the first onshore encounters between Maori and Pakeha 250 years ago.”

'Amazing community effort'

Tuia 250 was an opportunity to hold honest conversations about the past, present and how the nation could navigate its shared future, said Ms Evans.

“We have heard so many of these types of conversations, from all aspects of the spectrum, wherever our staff have been in the city and region. We are absolutely thrilled with the turnout of so many people from the Turanga/Gisborne community who have come to get onboard the voyaging waka and tall ships of the Tuia 250 Voyage flotilla.”

Many also took the opportunity to learn about Pacific voyaging traditions at the stardome and the roadshow truck the Tuia Matauranga Experience, which celebrates the expertise and knowledge of Pacific voyagers and navigators, while exploring the relationships between sea, land, and people.

Yesterday’s Tuia 250 Flotilla Open Day drew about 7000 people to the inner harbour area to visit the tall ships — the HMB Endeavour replica, the R. Tucker Thompson and the Spirit of New Zealand, as well as the waka hourua Tairawhiti, Haunui, Ngahiraka Mai Tawhiti and the Tahitian va’a Tipaerua Fa’afaite.

Families also made the most of the opportunity to ride steam train Wa165, with more than 4000 people catching the train either into or out of the inner harbour.

Tuia 250 ki Turanga commemorations manager Edwina Ashwell described the day as an “amazing community effort” with so many involved in ensuring it was a success.

“The commemorations started off on either side of the river. On one side whanau who are bearing a lot of hurt and on the other, whanau trying to manaaki our manuhiri.

“The open days were where we all came together to eat, share stories and learn from one another about the history of our region.

“It is something I didn’t have the opportunity to do when young. Tuia for me has not been about Cook. It is the beginning of something quite magical. I want my son to learn both sides of our history.

“There was so much kindness and grace today.

“We have had plenty of karakia around Tuia 250 and I think we have all felt it.

“A big thanks to the community, the inner harbour community and the fishing fraternity.

“It has been awesome.”

The mass pohiri on Saturday started the commemorations off in spectacular fashion. Thousands were at Te Waiohiharore (The Cut) to welcome the visitors and dignitaries to Turanganui a Kiwa. Many had attended the Pohiri 101 workshops to ensure they understood what was happening and to take part in waiata.

Tuesday saw about 4000 people gather along the Oneroa Walkway to share food, have family fun and enjoy the spectacle of the flotilla coming into and around the bay together.

Ms Philip-Barbara felt Tuia 250 ki Turanga had certainly started something.

“We have started something important for our whole country which will require continued commitment, generosity and goodwill. We are talking about the future of our nation and ensuring we reconnect with the vision of the Treaty.”

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the new identity and wellbeing focus of Trust Tairawhiti (formerly Eastland Community Trust)?