Punk rock Gisborne teen a finalist for Attitude Award

A voice for the disabled

A voice for the disabled

THE RIGHT ATTITUDE: Cory Newman and his band Sit Down in Front perform at the Powerstation in Auckland. The rising band’s incredible year has included opening for Jimmy Barnes, making the Smokefreerockquest national final, chart success, numerous positive reviews and regular radio airplay. Picture by Chris Morgan

BEING a voice for disabled people and showing the world what you can do are reasons for Cory Newman’s nomination for an Attitude Award.

The 16-year-old Campion College student has cerebral palsy but that has not stopped him from being the frontman for rising Gisborne punk rock band Sit Down in Front.

He is a finalist for the Attitude Youth Spirit Award at the 2019 Attitude Awards.

The Youth Spirit category is for a person up to the age of 20 who lives with a disability and has made a significant contribution to improving society.

“Being nominated for the award is pretty awesome,” Cory said.

“It’s great, I can be a voice for disabled people, I’m just out there with my three mates having fun and if I can inspire one person, disabled or not, and make the world a better place for just one person, then I have done my job.

“I have done my role in this world with Sit Down in Front.

“It’s about showing disabled people that they can do stuff like this.”

The Attitude awards and being nominated was a great vehicle for that, he said.

“It’s not about me. It’s about the disabled community in New Zealand and showing them a disability doesn’t hold you back.

“I feel like the luckiest guy in the world when I get to do stuff like travel the country doing what I love and being a voice and advocate for the disabled community.

“I am really appreciative that the band members’ families are supportive of us, even with my disability. Being able to do so much like opening for Jimmy Barnes and even the little things like hanging out with my best friends . . . is great and a real privilege,” he said.

“I’m thankful to live the life I do.”

Cory, the son of Carl and Angela Newman, has overcome numerous neurological and orthopaedic surgeries but it has never set him back.

“Have you ever heard of any other rock musicians who are disabled, let alone had songs on the charts?

“It’s all about showing disabled people what’s possible for them.”

He is looking forward to going to the awards ceremony and having a black tie experience.

“To state the obvious, fingers crossed I go from being nominated to winning.

“Another thing I am excited for is that Sit Down in Front will be performing at the award ceremony.

“I will also enjoy hanging out with my bandmates at the event.

“To quote our bass player (Roman Benson), ‘it’s great I get to support Cory and wear my nice-as shirt’.”

BEING a voice for disabled people and showing the world what you can do are reasons for Cory Newman’s nomination for an Attitude Award.

The 16-year-old Campion College student has cerebral palsy but that has not stopped him from being the frontman for rising Gisborne punk rock band Sit Down in Front.

He is a finalist for the Attitude Youth Spirit Award at the 2019 Attitude Awards.

The Youth Spirit category is for a person up to the age of 20 who lives with a disability and has made a significant contribution to improving society.

“Being nominated for the award is pretty awesome,” Cory said.

“It’s great, I can be a voice for disabled people, I’m just out there with my three mates having fun and if I can inspire one person, disabled or not, and make the world a better place for just one person, then I have done my job.

“I have done my role in this world with Sit Down in Front.

“It’s about showing disabled people that they can do stuff like this.”

The Attitude awards and being nominated was a great vehicle for that, he said.

“It’s not about me. It’s about the disabled community in New Zealand and showing them a disability doesn’t hold you back.

“I feel like the luckiest guy in the world when I get to do stuff like travel the country doing what I love and being a voice and advocate for the disabled community.

“I am really appreciative that the band members’ families are supportive of us, even with my disability. Being able to do so much like opening for Jimmy Barnes and even the little things like hanging out with my best friends . . . is great and a real privilege,” he said.

“I’m thankful to live the life I do.”

Cory, the son of Carl and Angela Newman, has overcome numerous neurological and orthopaedic surgeries but it has never set him back.

“Have you ever heard of any other rock musicians who are disabled, let alone had songs on the charts?

“It’s all about showing disabled people what’s possible for them.”

He is looking forward to going to the awards ceremony and having a black tie experience.

“To state the obvious, fingers crossed I go from being nominated to winning.

“Another thing I am excited for is that Sit Down in Front will be performing at the award ceremony.

“I will also enjoy hanging out with my bandmates at the event.

“To quote our bass player (Roman Benson), ‘it’s great I get to support Cory and wear my nice-as shirt’.”

Attitude Awards

The Attitude Awards celebrate the achievements of New Zealanders living with disabilities.

This year’s categories are Employer, Employee, Entrepreneur, Leadership, Making a Difference, Paralympian of the Decade, Spirit of Attitude, Support Superstar, Youth Spirit. and Supreme.

The black tie gala awards ceremony is to be held at Auckland’s Sky City on Friday, November 22.

An hour-long television special of the night will screen on TVNZ1 on Sunday, December 1.

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Jonna Hawke, Auckland - 10 days ago
So inspirational

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