Conquering ‘Everest’

Ticking off the Titirangi Mt Everest Challenge.

Ticking off the Titirangi Mt Everest Challenge.

The leading team once again are Huringa Pai who stand for “living healthy and longer together”. The 39 members, as of this morning, had racked up 2779 climbs at an average of 71 a team member. They are pictured here on Titirangi earlier this week. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell
SCALING NEW HEIGHTS: Martin Tatare is the top individual climber in the seven-week-long Titirangi Mt Everest Challenge that finishes tomorrow. As of this morning, Martin had scaled Titirangi/Kaiti Hill 630 times — the equivalent of reaching the summit of Mt Everest nine times. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell
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Keen climbers will be rewarded for their efforts tomorrow when the seven-week-long Titirangi Mt Everest Challenge officially ends.

The challenge requires participants to climb Titirangi/Kaiti Hill 68 times over the designated period — the equivalent of reaching the summit of Mount Everest (8848 metres).

Over 1800 people signed up for the seventh edition of the challenge. As of this morning 216 had achieved the magic 68, with plenty more expected to “knock it off” over the weekend.

Sean and Fiona Shivnan, of Sean Shivnan Pharmacy, created the challenge in 2013.

“One time when we were strolling down the hill we thought others might enjoy using a maunga (mountain) we have right on our doorstep as an exercise challenge,” said Fiona.

“We thought ‘well, how many climbs of Titirangi will it take to reach the equivalent of Everest?’ It’s 68 times, and that’s where the idea started.”

Sean said it began as an internal work challenge but they struggled with the logistics side of recording climbs.

Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti heard about it and stepped in to help by creating the database to reach out to the community, said Sean.

“GDC have come on board and made the hill one-way for traffic and that safety and their help has been massive.”

Proceeds from the challenge go towards helping those with bowel cancer.

“More people die from bowel cancer than from prostate and breast cancer put together, said Fiona. “I thought it would be a great to raise funds through the purchase of Titirangi T-shirts to help those with bowel cancer

“Exercise is also one way to help prevent bowel cancer.”

The leading individual climber this year is Martin Tatare, who, as of this morning, had logged 630 climbs — nine scalings of Mt Everest.

He plans to do “only 68” next year and has aspirations to put together a group to “continue the energy that has been created within the community”.

Martin said the challenge gave him the opportunity to meet “people “of all ages and from different backgrounds”, which he appreciated after teaching English in Korea for 18 years.

“Everybody doing this is really awesome and you’ve got to give them credit for doing this.”

He made special mention of a friend who had taken on the challenge with a walking stick in hand.

“Not only is she doing the challenge but she’s walking up the Home Guard (stairs) track . . . that’s fantastic.

“People have been digging deep in this challenge and it has been amazing seeing them find the strength within themselves to continue.

“We’ve had some really cold weather, rain and now this hot weather, but people are pushing on.”

Huringa Pai Charitable Trust, who have won the team challenge three years in a row, were today providing massages, food and water as part of what’s been called “marathon day” as many people close in on their 68th climb.

Willem Jordaan, one of the founders of the trust, said Tairawhiti was over-represented in national statistics when it came to diabetes and heart disease.

“In 2015, Mary Hope, Tony Hoskin, Cran Gage and myself looked for ways to produce healthy lifestyles, healthy eating and an active culture,” he said.

“It is absolutely awesome to see how diabetes statistics have decreased since this challenge began.”

The Huringa Pai 2019 whanau “don’t stop when the challenge stops”, he said.

“The challenge is about a sustainable positive change . . . whanau connecting to whanau and to the whenua (land), and living healthy and longer together.”

Pak’nSave has the largest number of team members this year — 113.

“We try to engage with all of our employees at Pak’nSave,” said wellbeing manager Cynthia Alva.

“We try to follow the Mental Health Foundation’s Five Ways to Wellbeing at Work (Connect, Give, Take Notice, Keep Learning, Be Active).

“This challenge is perfect for that,” she said.

Those who achieved the 68 climbs will get special recognition.

Keen climbers will be rewarded for their efforts tomorrow when the seven-week-long Titirangi Mt Everest Challenge officially ends.

The challenge requires participants to climb Titirangi/Kaiti Hill 68 times over the designated period — the equivalent of reaching the summit of Mount Everest (8848 metres).

Over 1800 people signed up for the seventh edition of the challenge. As of this morning 216 had achieved the magic 68, with plenty more expected to “knock it off” over the weekend.

Sean and Fiona Shivnan, of Sean Shivnan Pharmacy, created the challenge in 2013.

“One time when we were strolling down the hill we thought others might enjoy using a maunga (mountain) we have right on our doorstep as an exercise challenge,” said Fiona.

“We thought ‘well, how many climbs of Titirangi will it take to reach the equivalent of Everest?’ It’s 68 times, and that’s where the idea started.”

Sean said it began as an internal work challenge but they struggled with the logistics side of recording climbs.

Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti heard about it and stepped in to help by creating the database to reach out to the community, said Sean.

“GDC have come on board and made the hill one-way for traffic and that safety and their help has been massive.”

Proceeds from the challenge go towards helping those with bowel cancer.

“More people die from bowel cancer than from prostate and breast cancer put together, said Fiona. “I thought it would be a great to raise funds through the purchase of Titirangi T-shirts to help those with bowel cancer

“Exercise is also one way to help prevent bowel cancer.”

The leading individual climber this year is Martin Tatare, who, as of this morning, had logged 630 climbs — nine scalings of Mt Everest.

He plans to do “only 68” next year and has aspirations to put together a group to “continue the energy that has been created within the community”.

Martin said the challenge gave him the opportunity to meet “people “of all ages and from different backgrounds”, which he appreciated after teaching English in Korea for 18 years.

“Everybody doing this is really awesome and you’ve got to give them credit for doing this.”

He made special mention of a friend who had taken on the challenge with a walking stick in hand.

“Not only is she doing the challenge but she’s walking up the Home Guard (stairs) track . . . that’s fantastic.

“People have been digging deep in this challenge and it has been amazing seeing them find the strength within themselves to continue.

“We’ve had some really cold weather, rain and now this hot weather, but people are pushing on.”

Huringa Pai Charitable Trust, who have won the team challenge three years in a row, were today providing massages, food and water as part of what’s been called “marathon day” as many people close in on their 68th climb.

Willem Jordaan, one of the founders of the trust, said Tairawhiti was over-represented in national statistics when it came to diabetes and heart disease.

“In 2015, Mary Hope, Tony Hoskin, Cran Gage and myself looked for ways to produce healthy lifestyles, healthy eating and an active culture,” he said.

“It is absolutely awesome to see how diabetes statistics have decreased since this challenge began.”

The Huringa Pai 2019 whanau “don’t stop when the challenge stops”, he said.

“The challenge is about a sustainable positive change . . . whanau connecting to whanau and to the whenua (land), and living healthy and longer together.”

Pak’nSave has the largest number of team members this year — 113.

“We try to engage with all of our employees at Pak’nSave,” said wellbeing manager Cynthia Alva.

“We try to follow the Mental Health Foundation’s Five Ways to Wellbeing at Work (Connect, Give, Take Notice, Keep Learning, Be Active).

“This challenge is perfect for that,” she said.

Those who achieved the 68 climbs will get special recognition.

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