Cinderella . . . but not as we know it

Ilminster’s Green Team troupe presents repurposed Cinderella.

Ilminster’s Green Team troupe presents repurposed Cinderella.

They toured nine schools in one week but the Green Team of Ilminster Intermediate performers’ energy were unstoppable as a cast that included Brandon Reynolds (left), Achuna Soutar, Monet Maugham and Mia Hermon played the repurposed story of Cinderella to equally enthusiastic audiences including Makauri School yesterday. The environmentally-friendly pantomime featured heroine, a villain, audience interaction and enough bio-energy to top-up the national grid. Pictures by Liam Clayton
Ilminster Green Team at Makauri.

Life imitated art in a play in which a troupe of Ilminster Intermediate School students had to complete a project about the environment.

Known as the Green Team, the young actors repurposed the story of Cinderella for their environmentally-friendly pantomime, The Cinderella Project, that featured computer geek Nerderella, the Bling Sisters, Maurice the Mouse and Prince Reece Cycle. The panto’s own story began with a group of students who are tasked to complete a project about the environment.

“They see their neighbours put out stuff for second-hand shops,” said director Keren Rickard.

“In the box is an old book, Cinderella. To fulfil their project the students make a play where they can only re-use stuff found in the box.”

The Green Team performers lived the message they wanted to send in their play.

“At the outset we made a commitment we wouldn’t buy a single new thing for any of the props. We were tempted to shop at the Warehouse or a two dollar shop but we didn’t.”

Instead the Green Team found items at op shops and in the school drama room that could be repurposed for the show. Safety cones took on a new life as hats, mop heads made perfectly good hair while beaded macrame plant hangers were transformed into dreadlocks.

The young performers developed their own characters. The prince was the villain of the work.

“He owns a recycling factory and everyone thinks he’s a greenie but he’s not,” said Ms Rickard.

“Everything he collects is dumped down a stormwater drain.”

Maurice the Mouse uncovers — or is covered by — Prince Reece Cycle’s dirty secret.

“Maurice is hanging out around the stormwater drain with the Teenage Mutant Turtles,” said Ms Rickard,

“They are nearly buried by recycling that’d been dumped. Maurice takes the information to Nerderella.”

Nerderalla makes it her mission to find enough evidence to frame the environmentally-unfriendly Prince Reece Cycle and becomes an environment lawyer.

“The prince has to pay for his crimes against the environment.

Along with a villain to hiss at, no panto is complete without traditional catchphrases.

“Where is he?” cried the actors during a mouse chase around the audience.

“Kids were pointing at him and screaming,” said Ms Rickard.

The Green Team toured the show around nine schools in the Gisborne region.

“They did a great job.”

Life imitated art in a play in which a troupe of Ilminster Intermediate School students had to complete a project about the environment.

Known as the Green Team, the young actors repurposed the story of Cinderella for their environmentally-friendly pantomime, The Cinderella Project, that featured computer geek Nerderella, the Bling Sisters, Maurice the Mouse and Prince Reece Cycle. The panto’s own story began with a group of students who are tasked to complete a project about the environment.

“They see their neighbours put out stuff for second-hand shops,” said director Keren Rickard.

“In the box is an old book, Cinderella. To fulfil their project the students make a play where they can only re-use stuff found in the box.”

The Green Team performers lived the message they wanted to send in their play.

“At the outset we made a commitment we wouldn’t buy a single new thing for any of the props. We were tempted to shop at the Warehouse or a two dollar shop but we didn’t.”

Instead the Green Team found items at op shops and in the school drama room that could be repurposed for the show. Safety cones took on a new life as hats, mop heads made perfectly good hair while beaded macrame plant hangers were transformed into dreadlocks.

The young performers developed their own characters. The prince was the villain of the work.

“He owns a recycling factory and everyone thinks he’s a greenie but he’s not,” said Ms Rickard.

“Everything he collects is dumped down a stormwater drain.”

Maurice the Mouse uncovers — or is covered by — Prince Reece Cycle’s dirty secret.

“Maurice is hanging out around the stormwater drain with the Teenage Mutant Turtles,” said Ms Rickard,

“They are nearly buried by recycling that’d been dumped. Maurice takes the information to Nerderella.”

Nerderalla makes it her mission to find enough evidence to frame the environmentally-unfriendly Prince Reece Cycle and becomes an environment lawyer.

“The prince has to pay for his crimes against the environment.

Along with a villain to hiss at, no panto is complete without traditional catchphrases.

“Where is he?” cried the actors during a mouse chase around the audience.

“Kids were pointing at him and screaming,” said Ms Rickard.

The Green Team toured the show around nine schools in the Gisborne region.

“They did a great job.”

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