MATEENBAR ON MARCH

Middle East, US demand drives Pultron expansion.

Middle East, US demand drives Pultron expansion.

GISBORNE TECHNOLOGY IN SAUDI ARABIA: Pultron Composites’ Dubai-based subsidiary Mateenbar Ltd is the main supplier of glass fibre-reinforced polymer rebar for the 21 kilometre Jizan flood mitigation channel in Saudi Arabia. Pictures supplied
Pultron Composites chief executive Jasper Holdsworth (centre) is pictured with two Saudi Aramco vice-presidents at the Future Investment Initiative in Riyadh last month. They are holding copies of the MoU signed between the oil giant and Pultron, along with its subsidiary Mateenbar Ltd.

Pultron Composites is to build an equipment manufacturing plant in Gisborne to supply two new production plants planned for Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Along with Mateenbar Ltd, a subsidiary company which runs the plant Pultron established in Dubai in 2011, the new overseas plants will produce the high-strength, lightweight, steel alternative rebar (reinforcing rod), Mateenbar.

Meanwhile, oil giant Saudi Aramco and Pultron Composites have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU). The MoU is part of a Future Investment Initiative with a value of 93.75 million riyals (NZ$38.9m), according to Aramco.

Held in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia last month, the Future Investment Initiative is an annual investment forum that centres on trends in the world economy and investment environment.

The MoU was signed alongside Mateenbar Ltd.

Mateenbar has made a name for itself in the Middle East as a corrosion-free alternative to steel in aggressive environments, says Pultron chief executive Jasper Holdsworth.

The Middle East is one of the fastest growing markets for the industry-approved glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebar.

Saudi Aramco’s internal analysis shows GFRP rebar is qualified to replace 10 percent of the company’s total steel demand. It is the world’s largest company and has mandated GFRP rebar to be included in its engineering standards for reinforced concrete structures in corrosion-risk areas.

The MoU with Pultron aligns with Saudi Aramco’s long-term strategy in the use of non-metallic materials, says Mr Holdsworth.

“Saudi Aramco is endorsing our Mateenbar technology and mandating the use of GFRP rebar in slab-on-grade, seawalls, sidewalks, drainage channels and other coastal structures.”

The factory that will be built in Dammam in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia will be opened in March by a senior vice-president of Aramco and the New Zealand ambassador.

The North American plant is being built in Concord, North Carolina and is expected to be in operation by June. At 9659 square metres it will be about eight times larger than the existing facility in Dubai.

Mateenbar Ltd is the main supplier of GFRP rebar for Saudi Arabia’s 21km Jizan flood mitigation channel.

Paris Metro tunnel, F1 racetrack among 300 major builds

Because the Jizan refinery is in an area of high flood risk, the channel is the only defence for the 400,000 barrel per day oil refinery.

Once completed, the channel will be the biggest project in the world to be fully-reinforced with GFRP rebar.

Along with its corrosion-resistance properties, Mateenbar is quarter the weight of steel while its high tensile strength is close to twice that of steel. It is non-conductive, non-magnetic and consumes 70 percent of the embodied energy of steel.

Mateenbar has been used as reinforcement for the Grand Paris Metro tunnel, the F1 race track in Abu Dhabi, the tall, sail-shaped structure Burj Al Arab in Dubai, and more than 300 other major projects worldwide.

“It’s fantastic to see New Zealand ingenuity recognised at the highest levels in Saudi Arabia,” said Ahmad Zakkout, trade commissioner to Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain and Kuwait at the New Zealand embassy.

Pultron Composites is to build an equipment manufacturing plant in Gisborne to supply two new production plants planned for Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Along with Mateenbar Ltd, a subsidiary company which runs the plant Pultron established in Dubai in 2011, the new overseas plants will produce the high-strength, lightweight, steel alternative rebar (reinforcing rod), Mateenbar.

Meanwhile, oil giant Saudi Aramco and Pultron Composites have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU). The MoU is part of a Future Investment Initiative with a value of 93.75 million riyals (NZ$38.9m), according to Aramco.

Held in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia last month, the Future Investment Initiative is an annual investment forum that centres on trends in the world economy and investment environment.

The MoU was signed alongside Mateenbar Ltd.

Mateenbar has made a name for itself in the Middle East as a corrosion-free alternative to steel in aggressive environments, says Pultron chief executive Jasper Holdsworth.

The Middle East is one of the fastest growing markets for the industry-approved glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebar.

Saudi Aramco’s internal analysis shows GFRP rebar is qualified to replace 10 percent of the company’s total steel demand. It is the world’s largest company and has mandated GFRP rebar to be included in its engineering standards for reinforced concrete structures in corrosion-risk areas.

The MoU with Pultron aligns with Saudi Aramco’s long-term strategy in the use of non-metallic materials, says Mr Holdsworth.

“Saudi Aramco is endorsing our Mateenbar technology and mandating the use of GFRP rebar in slab-on-grade, seawalls, sidewalks, drainage channels and other coastal structures.”

The factory that will be built in Dammam in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia will be opened in March by a senior vice-president of Aramco and the New Zealand ambassador.

The North American plant is being built in Concord, North Carolina and is expected to be in operation by June. At 9659 square metres it will be about eight times larger than the existing facility in Dubai.

Mateenbar Ltd is the main supplier of GFRP rebar for Saudi Arabia’s 21km Jizan flood mitigation channel.

Paris Metro tunnel, F1 racetrack among 300 major builds

Because the Jizan refinery is in an area of high flood risk, the channel is the only defence for the 400,000 barrel per day oil refinery.

Once completed, the channel will be the biggest project in the world to be fully-reinforced with GFRP rebar.

Along with its corrosion-resistance properties, Mateenbar is quarter the weight of steel while its high tensile strength is close to twice that of steel. It is non-conductive, non-magnetic and consumes 70 percent of the embodied energy of steel.

Mateenbar has been used as reinforcement for the Grand Paris Metro tunnel, the F1 race track in Abu Dhabi, the tall, sail-shaped structure Burj Al Arab in Dubai, and more than 300 other major projects worldwide.

“It’s fantastic to see New Zealand ingenuity recognised at the highest levels in Saudi Arabia,” said Ahmad Zakkout, trade commissioner to Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain and Kuwait at the New Zealand embassy.

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