Poverty Bay back on top

Poverty Bay are the 40th anniversary winners of the Oligoi Jug after denying Te Puia Springs a drought-breaking victory in the final of the men’s interclub golf pennants on Sunday.

Poverty Bay are the 40th anniversary winners of the Oligoi Jug after denying Te Puia Springs a drought-breaking victory in the final of the men’s interclub golf pennants on Sunday.

GREEN MACHINE: The Poverty Bay (1) team who won the Oligoi Jug men’s interclub pennants title at Gisborne Park on Sunday are (from left): Simon Jeune, Peter Kerekere, Matthew Watts and William Brown.
They beat Te Puia Springs 6-2 in the matchplay final. Jeune, unbeaten over his seven matches, won the Sportsman Trophy for player of the series.
It was the sixth time Kerekere had been in a winning Bay team in the final while Watts and Brown tasted pennants title success for the first time.
Watts also joined an elite club of father-and-son winners. His dad Dougal was a member of winning teams in the late 1990s.
Others to play for the Bay over the 2015 series were Dougal Watts, Brent Colbert and Anaru Reedy. Picture by Paul Rickard

THE Bay side of William Brown (at No.1), Peter Kerekere (No.2), Simon Jeune (No.3) and Matthew Watts (No.4) defeated the East Coast club 6-2 in the 36-hole matchplay decider on the Gisborne Park course.

It was the 16th time a Poverty Bay side had claimed the title, and their first since 2010.

For Te Puia, it was agonising defeat for a club who last won it in 1992 and have lost all three finals they have made since then.

An out with the new and in with the old decision by Kerekere was to prove crucial in Sunday’s win.

On Saturday, Kerekere was spraying his new Titleist driver all over his home course during the first round of the Reynolds Cup matchplay competition.

Back to the Titleist

He managed to win that top 16 match but wisely decided he needed more practice time with the unfamiliar weapon, and reverted back to his old Titleist for the pennants final.

The decision was justified with an 8 and 7 thumping of John Wyllie after Kerekere led 3-up at the halfway stage.

It is the sixth time Kerekere has been a member of a PB team who have won the final. He first tasted success in 2004, then repeated it from 2006 to 2009.

He matched his overall tally with his sixth individual win of the 2015 pennants series in what was an echo in time. Kerekere and Wyllie met in the 2007 final at the Park, with Kerekere winning that 18-hole match 5 and 4.

Poverty Bay greenkeeper Brown, who is also a member at Waikohu, followed Kerekere’s latest win with a 4 and 3 victory over Andrew Higham — the dual member of Poverty Bay and Te Puia, and current senior club champion at both courses.

Brown led 2-up at lunch and highlighted his afternoon round with a superb 6-iron into the 17th (they started the afternoon round on the third hole) to end the match with a birdie.

In control

Meanwhile, Jeune was in control of his match against Jason Devery, a member of the winning 2010 Poverty Bay team.

And when 51-year-old Jeune won the 17th hole to go 3-up with three holes to play, the title was Poverty Bay’s and the pair shook hands there and then.

No one would have bet against Jeune going on to officially win the match but it was recorded as a half, as was the match between the No.4s – Watts and Terry-Roy McLeely, with McLeely dormie 3-up.

Jeune, who can’t recall if he had played in a winning pennants final in his five decades of playing golf, capped a memorable pennants by being presented the Sportsman Trophy for player of the series for his record of six wins and one half.

Kerekere had six wins and a loss while Brown, who missed two rounds, was five-from-five.

Patutahi consoled themselves after the disappointment of failing to make it four pennants titles in a row by winning the Pounamu Trophy playoff for third. They defeated Tolaga Bay 6-2, with No.3 Tony Akroyd’s win giving him a 6-1 record for the series.

Akroyd has a long and outstanding history in the Oligoi Jug, having won the title with three different clubs.

Kerekere, however, did suggest to Akroyd and his Patutahi clubmates that they wipe off the “Patutahi, home of the Oligoi Jug” line written on the club’s whiteboard.

THE Bay side of William Brown (at No.1), Peter Kerekere (No.2), Simon Jeune (No.3) and Matthew Watts (No.4) defeated the East Coast club 6-2 in the 36-hole matchplay decider on the Gisborne Park course.

It was the 16th time a Poverty Bay side had claimed the title, and their first since 2010.

For Te Puia, it was agonising defeat for a club who last won it in 1992 and have lost all three finals they have made since then.

An out with the new and in with the old decision by Kerekere was to prove crucial in Sunday’s win.

On Saturday, Kerekere was spraying his new Titleist driver all over his home course during the first round of the Reynolds Cup matchplay competition.

Back to the Titleist

He managed to win that top 16 match but wisely decided he needed more practice time with the unfamiliar weapon, and reverted back to his old Titleist for the pennants final.

The decision was justified with an 8 and 7 thumping of John Wyllie after Kerekere led 3-up at the halfway stage.

It is the sixth time Kerekere has been a member of a PB team who have won the final. He first tasted success in 2004, then repeated it from 2006 to 2009.

He matched his overall tally with his sixth individual win of the 2015 pennants series in what was an echo in time. Kerekere and Wyllie met in the 2007 final at the Park, with Kerekere winning that 18-hole match 5 and 4.

Poverty Bay greenkeeper Brown, who is also a member at Waikohu, followed Kerekere’s latest win with a 4 and 3 victory over Andrew Higham — the dual member of Poverty Bay and Te Puia, and current senior club champion at both courses.

Brown led 2-up at lunch and highlighted his afternoon round with a superb 6-iron into the 17th (they started the afternoon round on the third hole) to end the match with a birdie.

In control

Meanwhile, Jeune was in control of his match against Jason Devery, a member of the winning 2010 Poverty Bay team.

And when 51-year-old Jeune won the 17th hole to go 3-up with three holes to play, the title was Poverty Bay’s and the pair shook hands there and then.

No one would have bet against Jeune going on to officially win the match but it was recorded as a half, as was the match between the No.4s – Watts and Terry-Roy McLeely, with McLeely dormie 3-up.

Jeune, who can’t recall if he had played in a winning pennants final in his five decades of playing golf, capped a memorable pennants by being presented the Sportsman Trophy for player of the series for his record of six wins and one half.

Kerekere had six wins and a loss while Brown, who missed two rounds, was five-from-five.

Patutahi consoled themselves after the disappointment of failing to make it four pennants titles in a row by winning the Pounamu Trophy playoff for third. They defeated Tolaga Bay 6-2, with No.3 Tony Akroyd’s win giving him a 6-1 record for the series.

Akroyd has a long and outstanding history in the Oligoi Jug, having won the title with three different clubs.

Kerekere, however, did suggest to Akroyd and his Patutahi clubmates that they wipe off the “Patutahi, home of the Oligoi Jug” line written on the club’s whiteboard.

Oligoi Jug  interclub pennants

Final (36 holes) — Poverty Bay (1) 6 Te Puia Springs 2 (PB names first): William Brown def Andrew Higham 4 and 3, Peter Kerekere def John Wyllie 8 and 7, *Simon Jeune 3-up on Jason Devery with 3 to play, *Matthew Watts 3-down to Terry-Roy McLeely with 3 to play.

* matches not completed as PB had sealed victory, recorded as halves.

Pounamu Trophy (third place, 18 holes) — Patutahi 4 Tolaga Bay 2: Eddie Brown jr def Dion Milner 4 and 3, Hukanui Brown def Bruce Yates 2 and 1, Tony Akroyd def Tere Lincoln 6 and 5, Regan Hindmarsh lost to Taine Lincoln 1-down.

Fifth-sixth: Poverty Bay (2) 4 Gisborne Park 4.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.