A taste of perfection as Pete masters his craft

Anderson wins his first-round match in Poverty Bay Golf Club’s men’s championships, scores a career-first hole-in-one.

Anderson wins his first-round match in Poverty Bay Golf Club’s men’s championships, scores a career-first hole-in-one.

Pete Anderson

IF you’d asked Pete Anderson a couple of years ago what he’d rather be doing, making craft beer or playing golf, there would have been some deliberation before an answer.

Ask him now and the reply is instant . . . golf, for certain.

And days like last Saturday are the reason he looks as eagerly forward to hitting the course as a kid does to a December 25 visit from the fat bearded one.

Forty-years-young Anderson not only won his first-round match in Poverty Bay Golf Club’s men’s club championships, he scored a career-first hole-in-one along the way.

The 4-handicapper sank a wedge on the 121-metre sixth hole, encouraging his ball in with the classic Tiger Woods-inspired chant: “Get in the hole.”

Not only did it listen, it completed the journey in style, sucking back into the cup from a couple of feet past the pin.

“In the air I knew it’d end up close,” said Anderson, a Gisborne-based data analyst for Auckland company Datamine Limited.

“But I thought the pin had obscured the ball, rather than the ball screwing back in like you see the pros do on TV.”

Its fate was confirmed by mate Collin Jeffrey, playing in the group behind him, who used his rangefinder to see that the ball was resting against the pin.

Father-of-two Anderson was blown away and as he stood on the next tee, all he could think of was “how the hell do you respond to that?”

Simple. Get back to the job at hand, his match against Glenn Morley, which Anderson went on to win on the 15th.
Those who have played with Anderson in recent times would not be overly surprised at his ace effort.

Since getting back into the game seriously halfway through 2015, Anderson has clocked up plenty of practice hours with the ultimate aim of making the Poverty Bay-East Coast team for the Freyberg Masters national interprovincial this year being held at Dunedin’s Chisholm Links — so much so, his other passion, craft beer brewing, has become very much a secondary hobby.

The result has been a consistent reduction in his handicap, his first sub-par round (1-under 71 at the Bay) and an enhanced reputation as one of the more pure ball-strikers in the district.

If he was going to end a 30-years-plus wait for the perfect shot, odds are it was going to happen on the sixth hole.

There was a patch in June-July when he birdied it four rounds in a row.

But that one shot was just a bonus.

While it gets his name in gold lettering on the Poverty Bay honours board under hole-in-one achievers, he would love to see it up there under another section — senior club champion.


IF you’d asked Pete Anderson a couple of years ago what he’d rather be doing, making craft beer or playing golf, there would have been some deliberation before an answer.

Ask him now and the reply is instant . . . golf, for certain.

And days like last Saturday are the reason he looks as eagerly forward to hitting the course as a kid does to a December 25 visit from the fat bearded one.

Forty-years-young Anderson not only won his first-round match in Poverty Bay Golf Club’s men’s club championships, he scored a career-first hole-in-one along the way.

The 4-handicapper sank a wedge on the 121-metre sixth hole, encouraging his ball in with the classic Tiger Woods-inspired chant: “Get in the hole.”

Not only did it listen, it completed the journey in style, sucking back into the cup from a couple of feet past the pin.

“In the air I knew it’d end up close,” said Anderson, a Gisborne-based data analyst for Auckland company Datamine Limited.

“But I thought the pin had obscured the ball, rather than the ball screwing back in like you see the pros do on TV.”

Its fate was confirmed by mate Collin Jeffrey, playing in the group behind him, who used his rangefinder to see that the ball was resting against the pin.

Father-of-two Anderson was blown away and as he stood on the next tee, all he could think of was “how the hell do you respond to that?”

Simple. Get back to the job at hand, his match against Glenn Morley, which Anderson went on to win on the 15th.
Those who have played with Anderson in recent times would not be overly surprised at his ace effort.

Since getting back into the game seriously halfway through 2015, Anderson has clocked up plenty of practice hours with the ultimate aim of making the Poverty Bay-East Coast team for the Freyberg Masters national interprovincial this year being held at Dunedin’s Chisholm Links — so much so, his other passion, craft beer brewing, has become very much a secondary hobby.

The result has been a consistent reduction in his handicap, his first sub-par round (1-under 71 at the Bay) and an enhanced reputation as one of the more pure ball-strikers in the district.

If he was going to end a 30-years-plus wait for the perfect shot, odds are it was going to happen on the sixth hole.

There was a patch in June-July when he birdied it four rounds in a row.

But that one shot was just a bonus.

While it gets his name in gold lettering on the Poverty Bay honours board under hole-in-one achievers, he would love to see it up there under another section — senior club champion.


Garth Marchbank was fairly blasé about his recent hole-in-one at Poverty Bay. After all, it was his third.

Marchbank sank an 8-hybrid-club-hit tee shot on Poverty Bay’s sixth hole to complete a hat-trick. By all accounts, his playing partners were far more animated, probably because of the prospect of the man known to some as “Guru” shouting a beer on the 19th.

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