Shields unleashed

'Look out, bring your helmets!'

'Look out, bring your helmets!'

FOUND IT! Ron Young raises his arm in jubilation as Brian Morrissey watches on after finding his 8-iron on the bottom of the lake at Poverty Bay Golf Club on Tuesday.

YOU have to give credit to Steve Shields. He plays fewer rounds of golf a year than rainy days in Death Valley.

But tomorrow he will wake his golf clubs from a Rumpelstiltskin-like slumber, brush the tribe of daddy longleg, off his trundler, deposit the lot into the boot of the car and head to Poverty Bay golf course for his first round of the year — the Enterprise Motor Group men’s 36-hole open foursomes.

“Look out, bring your helmets,” says Shields, who, as sales manager at Enterprise, will be representing the long-time major sponsor in a tournament notorious for spirit-pulverising scoring.

Alongside him will be Central School principal Andy Hayward, who Shields claims is a strategic selection.

“He’s a big guy, with big shoulders.”

Shoulders that may need to be as wide as Andre the Giant’s if Hayward’s 36-handicapper partner takes the zig-zag path to the greens.

Enthusiasm and reminding himself that any day on the golf course is better than a day at work or in the garden could be the motivating factors for Shields, whose last official 18-hole round was in November of 2015 — 112, including a front nine holes of 60 . . . but no double-figures.

The Shields-Hayward combo are among a small field for this year’s edition, a number that will hopefully have grown by tomorrow morning’s 8am tee-off.

Back to chase a fourth consecutive gross title and once again get their hands on the gargantuan foursomes trophy will be Peter Kerekere and William Brown.

The pair’s scoring history in the tournament is a promising trend. They won it with a two-round total of 150 (75, 75) in 2014, and 149 in 2015 and 2016. The unconfirmed tournament record of 148 — set by Eddie Brown junior and Thomas Donovan in 2013 — is well within their capabilities if the weather plays its part.

The Kerekere-Brown and Brown-Donovan pairings are in the same group, which, on form, should produce the overall winners.

The Col-Coll over-50s combo of Brent Colbert and Collin Jeffrey could dispute that. They led after the first round last year only to spectacularly fold, thanks largely to an 8 on the par-3 11th hole.

Overall net honours are up for grabs. The duo to beat could be Ross Gibson and Barry Brown.

Late entries will be accepted. Contact the pro shop.

The draw

No.1 tee, 8am: B Colbert, C Jeffrey, P Rickard, B Morgan. 8.07: L Gunther, C Bauld, P Grogan, J Kerekere. 8.15: R Foon, N West, N Richardson, R Witters. 8.22: H Johanson, R Owen, B Brown, R Gibson. 8.30: D Patumaka, T Goldsmith, M Smith, A Kirkpatrick. 8.37: C Christie, D Bush, S Stevens, R Gascon. 8.45: B Cramp, B Campbell, V Richardson, R Kelly.
No.10 tee, 8am: J Situ, C Palmer, J Devery, J Bright. 8.15: D Situ, M Watts, S Shields, A Hayward. 8.22: S Palmer, B Payne, B Huhu, G McKinnon. 8.30: M Norman, K White, M Cox, G Brown. 8.37: P Kerekere, W Brown, E Brown jr, T Donovan.

Ron’s version of how this picture came about started the day before while he was playing in the first round of the Shark Trophy annual exchange between Gisborne East Coast and Bay of Plenty senior golfers.

The removal of a block of long-standing trees on the 17th hole has exposed that area of the golf course to the wind.
Ron, who was playing with Letty Poananga and Vaughan Powdrell, was putting out on the 16th when a gust got his nearby trundler rolling down a hill.

Poananga spotted it, gave chase, but was not quick enough and it careered into the lake about 30 metres away.

“My bag had everything in it — my keys, wallet, my lunch,” said Ron, who went in after it and recovered everything but the one club.

Ron, who started on the 10th, finished the nine — wet clothes and all — put on a change of clothes at the clubhouse, then completed one of the better rounds of the GEC seniors.

He went back the next day and, with the help of “good Samaritan” Brian Morrissey, tried to find the club with the use of a window cleaning extension pole with a rake taped to it.

That failed so Ron stripped down to his togs, waded in and after a 15-minute grid search with his feet, trod on the club in water up to his chin.

When accused of failing to apply the trundler brake in the first place, Ron replied: “They don’t work anyway.”

Ron is not the first victim of the lake. Thousands of balls have been claimed over its history, at least one golfer has thrown his clubs in it intentionally and there was the story of the member who parked his ute next to it, forgot to put the handbrake on and watched in horror as it ended in the drink.

A mate of the Gisborne Thistle AFC stalwart Ron rang him up afterwards to say they should rename the course Poverty Bay Country Club because it now has a swimming pool.

Club Med could be more appropriate.

YOU have to give credit to Steve Shields. He plays fewer rounds of golf a year than rainy days in Death Valley.

But tomorrow he will wake his golf clubs from a Rumpelstiltskin-like slumber, brush the tribe of daddy longleg, off his trundler, deposit the lot into the boot of the car and head to Poverty Bay golf course for his first round of the year — the Enterprise Motor Group men’s 36-hole open foursomes.

“Look out, bring your helmets,” says Shields, who, as sales manager at Enterprise, will be representing the long-time major sponsor in a tournament notorious for spirit-pulverising scoring.

Alongside him will be Central School principal Andy Hayward, who Shields claims is a strategic selection.

“He’s a big guy, with big shoulders.”

Shoulders that may need to be as wide as Andre the Giant’s if Hayward’s 36-handicapper partner takes the zig-zag path to the greens.

Enthusiasm and reminding himself that any day on the golf course is better than a day at work or in the garden could be the motivating factors for Shields, whose last official 18-hole round was in November of 2015 — 112, including a front nine holes of 60 . . . but no double-figures.

The Shields-Hayward combo are among a small field for this year’s edition, a number that will hopefully have grown by tomorrow morning’s 8am tee-off.

Back to chase a fourth consecutive gross title and once again get their hands on the gargantuan foursomes trophy will be Peter Kerekere and William Brown.

The pair’s scoring history in the tournament is a promising trend. They won it with a two-round total of 150 (75, 75) in 2014, and 149 in 2015 and 2016. The unconfirmed tournament record of 148 — set by Eddie Brown junior and Thomas Donovan in 2013 — is well within their capabilities if the weather plays its part.

The Kerekere-Brown and Brown-Donovan pairings are in the same group, which, on form, should produce the overall winners.

The Col-Coll over-50s combo of Brent Colbert and Collin Jeffrey could dispute that. They led after the first round last year only to spectacularly fold, thanks largely to an 8 on the par-3 11th hole.

Overall net honours are up for grabs. The duo to beat could be Ross Gibson and Barry Brown.

Late entries will be accepted. Contact the pro shop.

The draw

No.1 tee, 8am: B Colbert, C Jeffrey, P Rickard, B Morgan. 8.07: L Gunther, C Bauld, P Grogan, J Kerekere. 8.15: R Foon, N West, N Richardson, R Witters. 8.22: H Johanson, R Owen, B Brown, R Gibson. 8.30: D Patumaka, T Goldsmith, M Smith, A Kirkpatrick. 8.37: C Christie, D Bush, S Stevens, R Gascon. 8.45: B Cramp, B Campbell, V Richardson, R Kelly.
No.10 tee, 8am: J Situ, C Palmer, J Devery, J Bright. 8.15: D Situ, M Watts, S Shields, A Hayward. 8.22: S Palmer, B Payne, B Huhu, G McKinnon. 8.30: M Norman, K White, M Cox, G Brown. 8.37: P Kerekere, W Brown, E Brown jr, T Donovan.

Ron’s version of how this picture came about started the day before while he was playing in the first round of the Shark Trophy annual exchange between Gisborne East Coast and Bay of Plenty senior golfers.

The removal of a block of long-standing trees on the 17th hole has exposed that area of the golf course to the wind.
Ron, who was playing with Letty Poananga and Vaughan Powdrell, was putting out on the 16th when a gust got his nearby trundler rolling down a hill.

Poananga spotted it, gave chase, but was not quick enough and it careered into the lake about 30 metres away.

“My bag had everything in it — my keys, wallet, my lunch,” said Ron, who went in after it and recovered everything but the one club.

Ron, who started on the 10th, finished the nine — wet clothes and all — put on a change of clothes at the clubhouse, then completed one of the better rounds of the GEC seniors.

He went back the next day and, with the help of “good Samaritan” Brian Morrissey, tried to find the club with the use of a window cleaning extension pole with a rake taped to it.

That failed so Ron stripped down to his togs, waded in and after a 15-minute grid search with his feet, trod on the club in water up to his chin.

When accused of failing to apply the trundler brake in the first place, Ron replied: “They don’t work anyway.”

Ron is not the first victim of the lake. Thousands of balls have been claimed over its history, at least one golfer has thrown his clubs in it intentionally and there was the story of the member who parked his ute next to it, forgot to put the handbrake on and watched in horror as it ended in the drink.

A mate of the Gisborne Thistle AFC stalwart Ron rang him up afterwards to say they should rename the course Poverty Bay Country Club because it now has a swimming pool.

Club Med could be more appropriate.

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