Everyone's a winner

WATER HAZARD: Standing next to the flooded 12th green just before the pin was pulled on play in the final of the Oligoi Jug men’s interclub pennants at Gisborne Park are Poverty Bay (1) players Peter Kerekere and William Brown. Pictures by Tony Akroyd
Patutahi’s Regan Hindmarsh on the green-cum-swimming pool.
MISSION ACCOMPLISHED: Ngati Porou East Coast’s Hone Haerewa secures possession. Haerewa is playing his rugby in Wellington but returns as a player of origin for tomorrow’s match against Poverty Bay. Picture by Paul Rickard

IT was “cheer bro” and “share bro” after rain decided the 2017 Oligoi Jug men’s interclub final on Sunday.

For the first time in the 33-year history of the senior pennants the title was shared.

Defending champions Poverty Bay (1) and East Coast Farm Vets Patutahi won one match apiece in the morning foursomes but were unable to complete their four afternoon singles clashes.

A superbly-presented Gisborne Park golf course soaked up as much as it could but eventually surrendered to a relentless afternoon rain barrage.

When the players were called in from the 12th and 13th holes, greens were flooded and chipping and putting had become a lottery.

It was intended to wait it out and hopefully the rain would ease, but time and an unfavourable forecast put paid to that.

There is no rule as to what happens in the event of not being able to complete the final so, after discussion among team representatives, it was decided to share the title.

PB (1) were in control of one of the singles matches — Pete Anderson led Brown jr 5-up with six holes to play — and PB’s Peter Kerekere had a 3-up buffer on Tony Akroyd, but the other two matches were tight.

Foursomes victory

Earlier, Brown jr and Shayde Skudder beat Anderson and Simon Jeune 3 and 2 in the foursomes while Kerekere and William Brown were 2-under the card in defeating Akroyd and Regan Hindmarsh 5 and 4.

The Pounamu Trophy playoff for third between PB (2) and Te Puia Springs was also delicately balanced.

Springs No.1 Andrew Higham was dominating Anaru Reedy, PB (2)’s Collin Jeffrey was in charge against Neil Mackie while Te Puia had the edge in the other matches.

An official contingency is certain be in place next year.

One suggestion is that a designated number of holes constitutes a match. If play is called off, whatever the state of the match at the time is the result, as long as a desginated number of holes have been completed.

The most obvious contingency is to have a reserve date. There is plenty of year left and Sunday’s rained-off final could have been rescheduled to as late as summer.

With the foursomes having been completed, teams would have only needed to replay the singles.

The Oligoi Jug is a prestigious honour with a proud and exciting history including several sudden-death-decided finals.

The word oligoi is loosely connected to the Greek-derived oligarchy, which is a form of power structure where power rests with a few.

It seems only fitting the Oligoi Jug should be in the possession of the golfing “few”.

The Jug was jointly accepted at the prizegiving as rain continued to fall.

Special mention was made of the condition of the course.

Pennants organiser and PB (2) team member Brent Colbert said it was “immaculate” — a comment complemented by applause and general praise.

Amid all the weather-affected issues, no sportsman trophy was presented to the player of the series. This is still to be decided.

IT was “cheer bro” and “share bro” after rain decided the 2017 Oligoi Jug men’s interclub final on Sunday.

For the first time in the 33-year history of the senior pennants the title was shared.

Defending champions Poverty Bay (1) and East Coast Farm Vets Patutahi won one match apiece in the morning foursomes but were unable to complete their four afternoon singles clashes.

A superbly-presented Gisborne Park golf course soaked up as much as it could but eventually surrendered to a relentless afternoon rain barrage.

When the players were called in from the 12th and 13th holes, greens were flooded and chipping and putting had become a lottery.

It was intended to wait it out and hopefully the rain would ease, but time and an unfavourable forecast put paid to that.

There is no rule as to what happens in the event of not being able to complete the final so, after discussion among team representatives, it was decided to share the title.

PB (1) were in control of one of the singles matches — Pete Anderson led Brown jr 5-up with six holes to play — and PB’s Peter Kerekere had a 3-up buffer on Tony Akroyd, but the other two matches were tight.

Foursomes victory

Earlier, Brown jr and Shayde Skudder beat Anderson and Simon Jeune 3 and 2 in the foursomes while Kerekere and William Brown were 2-under the card in defeating Akroyd and Regan Hindmarsh 5 and 4.

The Pounamu Trophy playoff for third between PB (2) and Te Puia Springs was also delicately balanced.

Springs No.1 Andrew Higham was dominating Anaru Reedy, PB (2)’s Collin Jeffrey was in charge against Neil Mackie while Te Puia had the edge in the other matches.

An official contingency is certain be in place next year.

One suggestion is that a designated number of holes constitutes a match. If play is called off, whatever the state of the match at the time is the result, as long as a desginated number of holes have been completed.

The most obvious contingency is to have a reserve date. There is plenty of year left and Sunday’s rained-off final could have been rescheduled to as late as summer.

With the foursomes having been completed, teams would have only needed to replay the singles.

The Oligoi Jug is a prestigious honour with a proud and exciting history including several sudden-death-decided finals.

The word oligoi is loosely connected to the Greek-derived oligarchy, which is a form of power structure where power rests with a few.

It seems only fitting the Oligoi Jug should be in the possession of the golfing “few”.

The Jug was jointly accepted at the prizegiving as rain continued to fall.

Special mention was made of the condition of the course.

Pennants organiser and PB (2) team member Brent Colbert said it was “immaculate” — a comment complemented by applause and general praise.

Amid all the weather-affected issues, no sportsman trophy was presented to the player of the series. This is still to be decided.

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