Rough Riders East Coast dedicate victory to Jaymee Watson

Remembered: Jaymee Watson rode for the Rough Riders East Coast Horse Sports Club, and members dedicated their victory in the Peggy McDonald competition to her memory.


Overall winners: The Rough Riders East Coast Horse Sports Club (pictured) have won the top prize at one of the major events on the horse sports calendar. The club were overall winners at the Peggy McDonald Horse Sports competition in Opotiki, and dedicated the win to the late Jaymee Watson, who was a club member. Pictures supplied

The Rough Riders East Coast Horse Sports Club were overall winners at the Peggy McDonald Horse Sports competition in Opotiki last weekend.

Regarded as a major event in the horse sports community, the tournament — also known as “Peggy’s Day” — is named after the late Peggy McDonald, who established horse sports day in Opotiki.

The Rough Riders won the overall prize after finishing strong over six events — baton relay, stock horse, bending, medley, flag race and tandem barrel.

They also won the best parade trophy for the third time.

This year’s competition drew 14 teams, each of 12 riders — four men, four women and four children.

Club captain Georgia Komene said the win was dedicated to the memory of former club member Jaymee Watson, who passed away last year and was a renowned local rider and organiser.

“Jaymee rode for us for two years. We rode hard for her.”

She said they dedicated the win to her as a tribute.

“She left a huge hole in our team when she passed. That’s what spurred us on to ride hard.

“Everyone did their part to get us the win. It was an awesome combined effort.”

While the club is young, having been formed only four years ago in Wharekahika, Hicks Bay, it has been working its way up the ladder each season.

The Rough Riders were placed fourth the first year they entered the Peggy’s Day competition, and came second the following year.

“Peggy’s Day is a pretty big deal for horse people of all disciplines, and we do it all for the love of the sport and our horses,” Georgia Komene said.

“It’s a great community, and we build many relationships along the way.”

The Rough Riders East Coast Horse Sports Club were overall winners at the Peggy McDonald Horse Sports competition in Opotiki last weekend.

Regarded as a major event in the horse sports community, the tournament — also known as “Peggy’s Day” — is named after the late Peggy McDonald, who established horse sports day in Opotiki.

The Rough Riders won the overall prize after finishing strong over six events — baton relay, stock horse, bending, medley, flag race and tandem barrel.

They also won the best parade trophy for the third time.

This year’s competition drew 14 teams, each of 12 riders — four men, four women and four children.

Club captain Georgia Komene said the win was dedicated to the memory of former club member Jaymee Watson, who passed away last year and was a renowned local rider and organiser.

“Jaymee rode for us for two years. We rode hard for her.”

She said they dedicated the win to her as a tribute.

“She left a huge hole in our team when she passed. That’s what spurred us on to ride hard.

“Everyone did their part to get us the win. It was an awesome combined effort.”

While the club is young, having been formed only four years ago in Wharekahika, Hicks Bay, it has been working its way up the ladder each season.

The Rough Riders were placed fourth the first year they entered the Peggy’s Day competition, and came second the following year.

“Peggy’s Day is a pretty big deal for horse people of all disciplines, and we do it all for the love of the sport and our horses,” Georgia Komene said.

“It’s a great community, and we build many relationships along the way.”

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