Hutton ‘last man standing’

First club trophy: Anton McKay (17G), here racing against Crystal Peach (10G), won his first club trophy, the Phil Walsh Memorial for production saloons, on Sunday. McKay drove consistently well through the three-race series, despite close attention from the lifes of Fraser Wrigfht, Dave Gooch and Peach.

Gisborne Speedway Club’s summer season ended on Sunday with 22 battered and broken cars stopped all over the Eastland Group Raceway track, and more bits and pieces scattered about than you could shake a stick at.

The annual Jukes Carriers Demolition Derby Ramp Race finished off the season in style as the 23 competitors pounded each other’s cars to a standstill.

“Last man standing” was Nick Hutton, who outlasted the field with some hard hitting himself in a car that would not surrender.

“Nick drove an outstanding race,” club president Grant MacGregor said.

“He came pretty close to getting the stirrer’s prize as well, because of the way he went about it.

“He certainly entered into the spirit of the event.”

The stirrer’s prize for busiest, most combative driver went to David Kingsbeer.

The Pit Stop Saloon Car Champion of Champions trophy was hoisted by Mt Maunganui’s Michelle Wymer (75M). Kihikihi’s Ryan Neane (71K) was runner-up.

A dozen cars took part in the three-race series to decide the title.

Daniel Cook (77G) was the best of the Gisborne drivers and finished third.

“The track surface was unfortunately very slick, which created follow-the-leader type racing, but they were quick and showed some great driving skills on that surface,” MacGregor said.

Cook’s younger brother Ethan (76G) restored Gisborne’s status with an all-the-way drive to win the fourth saloon race of the afternoon, and take the Bruce Ellmers Memorial Trophy.

The younger Cook went from pole position, jumped out early and maintained a four-to-five-car-length lead until he ran up against the backmarkers in the final stages.

He managed to muscle his way down the final straight to take a deserved win.

The two street-car races that preceded the demolition derby produced some entertaining racing as the “learner” speedway drivers in the field came to terms with the banked and slick track.

“It was well worth watching, and exciting,” MacGregor said.

The stockcar fraternity got right into it, too, and just about ran a demolition derby of their own.

Only five cars were still running for the final race.

Mason O’Dwyer (99G), Jason Lovell (67G), James Clarke (29G), Dylan Pickering (56G) and Jonny Morley (98G) were all major contributors to the mayhem, with O’Dwyer and Lovell particularly keen on combat at close quarters.

Morley dished it out, too, and still managed a couple of hard-earned wins.

“They all raced like there was no tomorrow, and I think they had worked out who the main contenders were for the points trophies,” MacGregor said.

“They were hell-bent on stopping them.”

Phil Walsh Memorial Trophy was won by Anton McKay

The Phil Walsh Memorial Trophy for production saloons was won by Anton McKay (17G).

“That’s Anton’s first club trophy and he was over the moon about it.”

McKay drove consistently well through the three-race series, despite close attention from the likes of Fraser Wright (44G), Dave Gooch (7G) and Crystal Peach (10G).

Gooch went from pole in the final race, when only a few points separated the top four, but missed the green light to go and started slowly.

He was overtaken going down home straight and was unable to get back into a leading position.

Youth ministock driver Connor Humphreys drove well to win the last race in their series.

“Over the season he has improved and it was a fitting way for him to end the season,” MacGregor said.

Special laps of honour were conducted for the late Murray Michie by both the Eastland Kart Club and the saloon car field.

Murray Michie was the clerk of the course at the speedway for 10 years. He was farewelled at a well-attended funeral on Saturday.

• The club’s season may be extended to the weekend of June 2.

“We hope to run a winter meeting for the first time at Queen’s Birthway Weekend for all classes,” MacGregor said.

“There is a lot of interest in it and I believe it will happen this year.”

Overall the club had had an up-and-down season with the weather, he said.

“We’ve had to cancel a couple of meetings because of the weather, but you cannot fault the results our drivers have achieved.

“This has been one of our most successful seasons in terms of Speedway NZ and inter-club titles.”

Gisborne Speedway Club’s summer season ended on Sunday with 22 battered and broken cars stopped all over the Eastland Group Raceway track, and more bits and pieces scattered about than you could shake a stick at.

The annual Jukes Carriers Demolition Derby Ramp Race finished off the season in style as the 23 competitors pounded each other’s cars to a standstill.

“Last man standing” was Nick Hutton, who outlasted the field with some hard hitting himself in a car that would not surrender.

“Nick drove an outstanding race,” club president Grant MacGregor said.

“He came pretty close to getting the stirrer’s prize as well, because of the way he went about it.

“He certainly entered into the spirit of the event.”

The stirrer’s prize for busiest, most combative driver went to David Kingsbeer.

The Pit Stop Saloon Car Champion of Champions trophy was hoisted by Mt Maunganui’s Michelle Wymer (75M). Kihikihi’s Ryan Neane (71K) was runner-up.

A dozen cars took part in the three-race series to decide the title.

Daniel Cook (77G) was the best of the Gisborne drivers and finished third.

“The track surface was unfortunately very slick, which created follow-the-leader type racing, but they were quick and showed some great driving skills on that surface,” MacGregor said.

Cook’s younger brother Ethan (76G) restored Gisborne’s status with an all-the-way drive to win the fourth saloon race of the afternoon, and take the Bruce Ellmers Memorial Trophy.

The younger Cook went from pole position, jumped out early and maintained a four-to-five-car-length lead until he ran up against the backmarkers in the final stages.

He managed to muscle his way down the final straight to take a deserved win.

The two street-car races that preceded the demolition derby produced some entertaining racing as the “learner” speedway drivers in the field came to terms with the banked and slick track.

“It was well worth watching, and exciting,” MacGregor said.

The stockcar fraternity got right into it, too, and just about ran a demolition derby of their own.

Only five cars were still running for the final race.

Mason O’Dwyer (99G), Jason Lovell (67G), James Clarke (29G), Dylan Pickering (56G) and Jonny Morley (98G) were all major contributors to the mayhem, with O’Dwyer and Lovell particularly keen on combat at close quarters.

Morley dished it out, too, and still managed a couple of hard-earned wins.

“They all raced like there was no tomorrow, and I think they had worked out who the main contenders were for the points trophies,” MacGregor said.

“They were hell-bent on stopping them.”

Phil Walsh Memorial Trophy was won by Anton McKay

The Phil Walsh Memorial Trophy for production saloons was won by Anton McKay (17G).

“That’s Anton’s first club trophy and he was over the moon about it.”

McKay drove consistently well through the three-race series, despite close attention from the likes of Fraser Wright (44G), Dave Gooch (7G) and Crystal Peach (10G).

Gooch went from pole in the final race, when only a few points separated the top four, but missed the green light to go and started slowly.

He was overtaken going down home straight and was unable to get back into a leading position.

Youth ministock driver Connor Humphreys drove well to win the last race in their series.

“Over the season he has improved and it was a fitting way for him to end the season,” MacGregor said.

Special laps of honour were conducted for the late Murray Michie by both the Eastland Kart Club and the saloon car field.

Murray Michie was the clerk of the course at the speedway for 10 years. He was farewelled at a well-attended funeral on Saturday.

• The club’s season may be extended to the weekend of June 2.

“We hope to run a winter meeting for the first time at Queen’s Birthway Weekend for all classes,” MacGregor said.

“There is a lot of interest in it and I believe it will happen this year.”

Overall the club had had an up-and-down season with the weather, he said.

“We’ve had to cancel a couple of meetings because of the weather, but you cannot fault the results our drivers have achieved.

“This has been one of our most successful seasons in terms of Speedway NZ and inter-club titles.”

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