Batting heroics

Victory foundation: Nathaniel Fearnley on the attack against Makauri making 73 runs before retiring. Pictures by Paul Rickard
Mangapapa School’s Connor Starck scored 42 not out in the match against Makauri.
Lucy McDiarmid bowled for Makauri.
Joel Kirkpatrick bowled for Makauri.

IT is better to have won the MCC Bat and lost it than never to have held it.

A 66-run loss to Mangapapa at Nelson Park ended Makauri School’s two-week reign as holders of Poverty Bay primary school cricket’s prestigious challenge trophy.

Having lost the toss and put into bat, Mangapapa posted 162 for the loss of just two wickets from their 20 overs.

Nathaniel Fearnley and Connor Starck produced the partnership of the MCC Bat season — 81.

Both boys retired, Fearnley posting a sensational 73 runs off 53 balls, including eight boundaries and a six; Starck making 42 off 45, including four fours.

Medium-pacer Ari Robertson took 2-34 from four overs.

In reply, Makauri were bowled out for 96 in 19.4 overs after No.4 batsman and co-captain Taye McGuinness played the third super knock of the day. His 50 off 54 balls featured six boundaries.

All-rounder Fearnley backed up his batting heroics with 3-12 with the ball, Malsha Mahabalage claimed 2-14, Arlo Willis 2-15 and Felix Sparks 1-4.

Wicketkeeper Jerome Tamatea conceded only one bye in an outstanding effort behind the stumps.

Victory was all the sweeter for Mangapapa, who unsuccessfully challenged Makaraka for the MCC Bat before Makauri won the trophy by 10 wickets.

“The MCC Bat was first presented in 1935 and this is the eighth time we’ve held it since 1958,” said Mangapapa principal Paul Sadler. “Chris Adams has done a fantastic job coaching the team. We’re extremely proud of the players for not just winning this, but upholding our values, which include respect, and heart.”

Tim Kirkpatrick, proud coach of what was the first Makauri side to win the MCC Bat, said they were not sure if they were going to have the numbers to field a hardball team for Saturday morning cricket.

“But the support, enthusiasm and hard work of Dave McDonald and Mel Knight of the Poverty Bay Cricket Association was such that we had two more girls — up from one to three — and seven boys — up by four — playing hardball.

“To have the bat gave our players a real lift. It’s a special trophy and just to get out of class and play good, keen opposition was a thrill.”

IT is better to have won the MCC Bat and lost it than never to have held it.

A 66-run loss to Mangapapa at Nelson Park ended Makauri School’s two-week reign as holders of Poverty Bay primary school cricket’s prestigious challenge trophy.

Having lost the toss and put into bat, Mangapapa posted 162 for the loss of just two wickets from their 20 overs.

Nathaniel Fearnley and Connor Starck produced the partnership of the MCC Bat season — 81.

Both boys retired, Fearnley posting a sensational 73 runs off 53 balls, including eight boundaries and a six; Starck making 42 off 45, including four fours.

Medium-pacer Ari Robertson took 2-34 from four overs.

In reply, Makauri were bowled out for 96 in 19.4 overs after No.4 batsman and co-captain Taye McGuinness played the third super knock of the day. His 50 off 54 balls featured six boundaries.

All-rounder Fearnley backed up his batting heroics with 3-12 with the ball, Malsha Mahabalage claimed 2-14, Arlo Willis 2-15 and Felix Sparks 1-4.

Wicketkeeper Jerome Tamatea conceded only one bye in an outstanding effort behind the stumps.

Victory was all the sweeter for Mangapapa, who unsuccessfully challenged Makaraka for the MCC Bat before Makauri won the trophy by 10 wickets.

“The MCC Bat was first presented in 1935 and this is the eighth time we’ve held it since 1958,” said Mangapapa principal Paul Sadler. “Chris Adams has done a fantastic job coaching the team. We’re extremely proud of the players for not just winning this, but upholding our values, which include respect, and heart.”

Tim Kirkpatrick, proud coach of what was the first Makauri side to win the MCC Bat, said they were not sure if they were going to have the numbers to field a hardball team for Saturday morning cricket.

“But the support, enthusiasm and hard work of Dave McDonald and Mel Knight of the Poverty Bay Cricket Association was such that we had two more girls — up from one to three — and seven boys — up by four — playing hardball.

“To have the bat gave our players a real lift. It’s a special trophy and just to get out of class and play good, keen opposition was a thrill.”

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you think Simon Bridges will still be leader of the National Party at the next election?