Big ‘day’ at the races could put pressure on for two days in future

EDITORIAL

The Gisborne community gets a once-in-a-year opportunity tomorrow to enjoy a day at the races, and in the process do our bit to bolster a local institution that is more than a century old.

The Poverty Bay Turf Club will be racing at Makaraka on one of the most beautiful provincial racecourses in the country, with a superb track surface.

Keeping that tradition going has been a struggle for a small but stalwart group led by president Alan Davidson, who this year have seen some welcome new blood join their ranks.

The club is in a strong financial position, able to use its investments from the sale of the course to subsidise trainer costs and keep stakes worthwhile, including a $30,000 cup race.

In this sense they can thank developer David Meban, who was a good landlord before his Makaraka project was placed in receivership. Irrespective of what transpires from here on, the club has an ironclad long-term lease.

Linking with the neighbouring Wairoa club — which hosts races on Thursday and Sunday next week — is another good idea as it allows trainers to bring a team here and move on to a two-day meeting nearby.

A casual observer might wonder why Wairoa gets two racing days while Gisborne has only one; a great turnout tomorrow might be the catalyst for a future second race day for the Poverty Bay Turf Club. It is encouraging to see that acceptances are at the level where the club might have to ballot out some horses from a race, something that has not happened here for some years.

The committee is to be congratulated for its decision to make this a community fun day with things like a children’s play area, while corporate areas have also been well supported. Anecdotally it seems there will be a good crowd, including a number of people saying they are not normally interested in racing but will go for a fun day out.

In the true spirit of racing, the club has had a punt with its financial investment for this meeting. Let’s hope that it collects a deserved winning dividend tomorrow.

The Gisborne community gets a once-in-a-year opportunity tomorrow to enjoy a day at the races, and in the process do our bit to bolster a local institution that is more than a century old.

The Poverty Bay Turf Club will be racing at Makaraka on one of the most beautiful provincial racecourses in the country, with a superb track surface.

Keeping that tradition going has been a struggle for a small but stalwart group led by president Alan Davidson, who this year have seen some welcome new blood join their ranks.

The club is in a strong financial position, able to use its investments from the sale of the course to subsidise trainer costs and keep stakes worthwhile, including a $30,000 cup race.

In this sense they can thank developer David Meban, who was a good landlord before his Makaraka project was placed in receivership. Irrespective of what transpires from here on, the club has an ironclad long-term lease.

Linking with the neighbouring Wairoa club — which hosts races on Thursday and Sunday next week — is another good idea as it allows trainers to bring a team here and move on to a two-day meeting nearby.

A casual observer might wonder why Wairoa gets two racing days while Gisborne has only one; a great turnout tomorrow might be the catalyst for a future second race day for the Poverty Bay Turf Club. It is encouraging to see that acceptances are at the level where the club might have to ballot out some horses from a race, something that has not happened here for some years.

The committee is to be congratulated for its decision to make this a community fun day with things like a children’s play area, while corporate areas have also been well supported. Anecdotally it seems there will be a good crowd, including a number of people saying they are not normally interested in racing but will go for a fun day out.

In the true spirit of racing, the club has had a punt with its financial investment for this meeting. Let’s hope that it collects a deserved winning dividend tomorrow.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you have a better understanding of the first encounters here between Maori and Europeans after the Tuia 250 Ki Turanga commemorations?