Super Tuesday points to a Trump-Clinton White House race

EDITORIAL

And then there were two . . . well that’s not quite the situation after the biggest single day in the US presidential nomination race but the two front-runners, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, seriously solidified their positions on “Super Tuesday”.

Clinton won the big states of Texas, Georgia and Virginia and has the Democratic nomination firmly in her grip. Bernie Sanders did manage to win four of the 12 states and has vowed to fight on.

Super Tuesday is always pivotal, with one quarter of Republican and one fifth of Democratic delegates contested as they move to the national conventions in July.

Clinton, the ultimate survivor of US politics, can now turn her attention to Trump — and also doesn’t want to alienate newly-energised Sanders supporters.

The brash billionaire likewise has his eyes on the main event now, almost appearing magnanimous as he claimed to be the one to unify Republicans.

There were only crumbs for Trump’s two main rivals. Marco Rubio finally landed his first win in Minnesota, while Ted Cruz won his home state of Texas as well as Oklahoma and Alaska.

The two young Cuban-Americans have failed to make a dent in Trump’s surge towards the Republican nomination. It is clear that to stop him, one along with John Kasich would have to withdraw from the race. Even then it would be extremely hard . . . and a withdrawal appears out of the question for now anyway.

Outside the United States the prospect of a win by Trump is seen as frightening. The UK media in particular has been strongly critical. The highly respected Economist newspaper said this week he is unfit to lead a great political party, let alone America.

Trump has excited a strong support base in the Republican Party, but many doubt whether that would carry on into a general election where many people not registered with either party get to vote. Much of the rest of the world is hoping it would not, and even those who are not fans of Clinton and her husband Bill — including many “economic Republicans” — would support her in a face-off with The Donald.

And then there were two . . . well that’s not quite the situation after the biggest single day in the US presidential nomination race but the two front-runners, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, seriously solidified their positions on “Super Tuesday”.

Clinton won the big states of Texas, Georgia and Virginia and has the Democratic nomination firmly in her grip. Bernie Sanders did manage to win four of the 12 states and has vowed to fight on.

Super Tuesday is always pivotal, with one quarter of Republican and one fifth of Democratic delegates contested as they move to the national conventions in July.

Clinton, the ultimate survivor of US politics, can now turn her attention to Trump — and also doesn’t want to alienate newly-energised Sanders supporters.

The brash billionaire likewise has his eyes on the main event now, almost appearing magnanimous as he claimed to be the one to unify Republicans.

There were only crumbs for Trump’s two main rivals. Marco Rubio finally landed his first win in Minnesota, while Ted Cruz won his home state of Texas as well as Oklahoma and Alaska.

The two young Cuban-Americans have failed to make a dent in Trump’s surge towards the Republican nomination. It is clear that to stop him, one along with John Kasich would have to withdraw from the race. Even then it would be extremely hard . . . and a withdrawal appears out of the question for now anyway.

Outside the United States the prospect of a win by Trump is seen as frightening. The UK media in particular has been strongly critical. The highly respected Economist newspaper said this week he is unfit to lead a great political party, let alone America.

Trump has excited a strong support base in the Republican Party, but many doubt whether that would carry on into a general election where many people not registered with either party get to vote. Much of the rest of the world is hoping it would not, and even those who are not fans of Clinton and her husband Bill — including many “economic Republicans” — would support her in a face-off with The Donald.

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lloyd gretton - 3 years ago
The Donald might be a duck at times. But he does remind the world that the American electorate is more than 70 percent white and mostly at least nominally Christian. He supports Israel but is not a lap dog for Likud. He supports toleration for gays but personally opposes gay marriage and thinks the issue should be left to states. He opposes the American people being made economically redundant. He won't apologise for being white and male. It is called the white backlash.